daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > North American Skyscrapers Forum > Canada > Ontario

Ontario » Toronto



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old May 25th, 2017, 05:26 PM   #2141
ldoto
Londoner
 
ldoto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: London,ont
Posts: 1,053
Likes (Received): 3

Feds, Ontario, city pump $38M into keeping water out of basements, sewage out of Thames

A $38-million investment announced Wednesday aims to keep water out of London basements and human waste out of the Thames River.

The cash, from Ottawa, Queen’s Park and city hall, will go to largely unseen infrastructure — sewers and water treatment tools, for example — that controls and protects the local water system.

“It’s not glamorous stuff, but it’s important stuff,” London West MP Kate Young said.

The funding is split 50/20/20, with 50 per cent ($18 million) coming from Ottawa and 20 per cent ($9 million) each from the province and city. City hall’s share is to be drawn from existing capital *budgets.

The money will go to several improvements, including:
•Increasing sewer system capacity to prevent basement flooding and effluent spilling into the Thames River.
•Separating sewer lines to cut the amount of storm water going to treatment plants.
•Improving storm water retention ponds to reduce flooding and erosion.
•Upgrading parts of Greenway and Pottersburg pollution control plants to cut energy costs.

The city is in the midst of a $40-million expansion of the Greenway plant to serve large developments planned for southwest London. That work, unrelated to Wednesday’s announcement, is slated to be done by late 2018.

Overflow of human waste into the Thames is a long-standing issue, particularly for local environmentalists. It’s been linked to the huge growth of life-killing algae in Lake Erie, into which the river flows.

As an example: in the first three months of 2016, heavy rains *overwhelmed the system and

sent 59,473 cubic metres of raw sewage — enough to fill 60 Olympic-sized swimming pools — into the river.

Wednesday’s funding “increases our quality of life (and) improves our natural environment,” Mayor Matt Brown said.

“Our infrastructure is the backbone of our community.”

Millions more in federal funding was sprinkled Wednesday on dozens of water and sewer projects across the region, in communities including Lucan, St. Thomas, *Strathroy and Oxford County.


By Patrick Maloney, The London Free Press
ldoto no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old May 25th, 2017, 05:38 PM   #2142
ldoto
Londoner
 
ldoto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: London,ont
Posts: 1,053
Likes (Received): 3

City staff to lobby CP and CN to share rail lines in London

A CP Rail train travels down the tracks.


Discussions on how to solve the Talbot Street bridge ‘truck can opener’ dilemma have morphed into a push to possibly change the way Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) trains run through London.

City staff have already said moving the tracks would be too expensive, but the civic works committee is now asking them to appeal to CP and Canadian National Railway (CN) to share rail lines that already exist within the city.



While the Talbot Street underpass has plagued inattentive truck drivers for years, discussions on potentially moving the tracks really started to heat up amid debate over bus rapid transit (BRT).

Signage at Talbot bridge doing little to curb crashes: report

It was eventually scrapped due to the cost but staff initially proposed running a BRT tunnel under Richmond Row to avoid the level rail crossing, which will delay BRT buses unless city hall can find another solution.

Bus rapid transit routes finalized with King/Queens couplet, minus tunnel

During Wednesday’s committee meeting, Coun. Bill Armstrong said the city should lobby the federal government to support moving CP trains onto CN tracks.


“It’s time that we saw some action, we saw everybody come to the table, and we saw some serious co-operation especially from CN and CP, they need to work together,” he said. “They work together in other communities, [in] Sudbury they both use the same track up there, and the same track back, why can’t we do that here?”

When Armstrong first pitched the idea earlier this month, staff expressed doubts CP and CN would be on board based on previous conversations. However, staff agreed to give the negotiations another shot during Wednesday’s committee meeting.

Staff hope to report back to city politicians with an update on those talks this fall.

They also received the information regarding the Talbot Street underpass, but staff have previously said physically moving the tracks would cost billions of dollars.

Coun. Phil Squire hopes staff will be able to bring an end to further suggestions that the city move the tracks.

“If we spend the next eight years talking about it and we’re not doing the other things that we can do, which is the Adelaide underpass, looking at Richmond, then we’re going to be in the same spot in eight years and people are going to be standing up in a meeting going, ‘why don’t you move the tracks?'” Squire said. “So when do we get the definitive, stamp it, we’ve tried it, we’ve talked to them, [and] it’s not going to happen, or has that already happened?”

London drivers spend average of 18 minutes stuck in traffic

Roughly half a dozen trucks strike the Talbot Street underpass each year. Back on August 20, 2015, the city added enhanced warning signage around the underpass. There are currently four signs cautioning drivers heading south on Talbot Street, and nine signs cautioning drivers heading north.

A report from city staff suggests raising the problematic bridge would require the construction of a new train bridge spanning Oxford Street and the Thames River, while lowering Talbot would jeopardize the underpass’s stability and hamper utilities below ground.


AM980 By Natalie Lovie
ldoto no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 27th, 2017, 06:04 AM   #2143
SammyJohn
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 7
Likes (Received): 1

well that's a good thing!
SammyJohn no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 27th, 2017, 06:06 AM   #2144
SammyJohn
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 7
Likes (Received): 1

About time

Quote:
Originally Posted by ldoto View Post
A CP Rail train travels down the tracks.


Discussions on how to solve the Talbot Street bridge ‘truck can opener’ dilemma have morphed into a push to possibly change the way Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) trains run through London.

City staff have already said moving the tracks would be too expensive, but the civic works committee is now asking them to appeal to CP and Canadian National Railway (CN) to share rail lines that already exist within the city.



While the Talbot Street underpass has plagued inattentive truck drivers for years, discussions on potentially moving the tracks really started to heat up amid debate over bus rapid transit (BRT).

Signage at Talbot bridge doing little to curb crashes: report

It was eventually scrapped due to the cost but staff initially proposed running a BRT tunnel under Richmond Row to avoid the level rail crossing, which will delay BRT buses unless city hall can find another solution.

Bus rapid transit routes finalized with King/Queens couplet, minus tunnel

During Wednesday’s committee meeting, Coun. Bill Armstrong said the city should lobby the federal government to support moving CP trains onto CN tracks.


“It’s time that we saw some action, we saw everybody come to the table, and we saw some serious co-operation especially from CN and CP, they need to work together,” he said. “They work together in other communities, [in] Sudbury they both use the same track up there, and the same track back, why can’t we do that here?”

When Armstrong first pitched the idea earlier this month, staff expressed doubts CP and CN would be on board based on previous conversations. However, staff agreed to give the negotiations another shot during Wednesday’s committee meeting.

Staff hope to report back to city politicians with an update on those talks this fall.

They also received the information regarding the Talbot Street underpass, but staff have previously said physically moving the tracks would cost billions of dollars.

Coun. Phil Squire hopes staff will be able to bring an end to further suggestions that the city move the tracks.

“If we spend the next eight years talking about it and we’re not doing the other things that we can do, which is the Adelaide underpass, looking at Richmond, then we’re going to be in the same spot in eight years and people are going to be standing up in a meeting going, ‘why don’t you move the tracks?'” Squire said. “So when do we get the definitive, stamp it, we’ve tried it, we’ve talked to them, [and] it’s not going to happen, or has that already happened?”

London drivers spend average of 18 minutes stuck in traffic

Roughly half a dozen trucks strike the Talbot Street underpass each year. Back on August 20, 2015, the city added enhanced warning signage around the underpass. There are currently four signs cautioning drivers heading south on Talbot Street, and nine signs cautioning drivers heading north.

A report from city staff suggests raising the problematic bridge would require the construction of a new train bridge spanning Oxford Street and the Thames River, while lowering Talbot would jeopardize the underpass’s stability and hamper utilities below ground.


AM980 By Natalie Lovie
well i would say that it is about time. There is nothing more frustrating then trains stopped in the middle of the city
SammyJohn no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 31st, 2017, 06:28 AM   #2145
ldoto
Londoner
 
ldoto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: London,ont
Posts: 1,053
Likes (Received): 3

South Street develop 18- and 24-storey towers

South Street: A Toronto developer will buy a chunk of the land for $2M and develop 18- and 24-storey residential towers





London has cleared the way to redevelop some of the most coveted land in the city, part of the massive site occupied for more than a century by hospitals at the gateway to the downtown.

City council Tuesday approved a $2-million agreement with Medallion Corp., which has built rental high-rises in the east end just off the downtown, to acquire and develop one-quarter of the South Street lands cleared by demolition of buildings on the sprawling former Victoria Hospital site overlooking the Thames River.

City hall had sought expressions of interest from companies for first-phase development of the lands near the SoHo neighbourhood, which at the time was considered a rare opportunity to build on one of the choice locations in London.

In a news release late Tuesday, the city said the deal with Toronto-based Medallion "represents a major project contributing towards council's strategic plan its goals to build a sustainable city and conserve London's heritage assets."

Mayor Matt Brown described the agreement as "the opportunity of a century for a neighbourhood in the heart of our city."

Medallion's proposal calls for 18- and 24-storey residential towers, their base facing both South Street and a future promenade along the river. The historic Colborne Building on the site will, under a deal requirement, be reused for residential and commercial purposes.

The sale price for the land is $2 million.

For more on the story, return to lfpress.com Wednesday
ldoto no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu