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Old January 15th, 2007, 09:37 AM   #1
london lad
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Principal Place | Hackney | 161m/67m | 51/17 fl | Site Prep

Having looked into Hammersons plans for Northgate further I have found this from propertyweek last september- Northgate looks like being a 32 cylindrical office tower & 40 storey mixed use tower.

Having looked further I noticed Hammerson have submitted a scoping report to Hackney council for;

1 office building up to 35 storeys
1 mixed use tower up to 51 storeys
1 building up to 11 storeys
1 building for afordable housing up to 16 storeys.

http://www2.hackney.gov.uk/planning/...1&docid=216753

Now this was submitted last October & according to the following report it should be due to go into planning sometime in the next couple of months.


- - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - -


The extra Mile

Hammerson plans to redraw the map of the Square Mile with a Lord Foster-designed scheme in Northgate.


15.09.2006

By Claer Barrett

Hammerson is to submit a planning application for a Foster & Partners-designed double-tower scheme on its Northgate site in Hackney within the next six months.

To the north of Broadgate, abutting Shoreditch High Street, 1.5m sq ft (139,353 sq m) of mixed-use development is proposed, extending the established northern boundary of the Square Mile.

Today, the Northgate site – owned by the London Borough of Hackney and on which Hammerson has the sole development option – is a mass of rubble and weeds. Hammerson acquired the front section of the T-shaped site as part of a Network Rail development portfolio in December 2002.

Hammerson’s London group director Sven Topel will not divulge the details of the plans before the application is submitted, but Property Week can reveal that a Foster-designed cylindrical 32-storey office tower is planned for the front of the site. A further office building of 200,000 sq ft (18,580 sq m) is planned for the western end, which adjoins Curtain Road.

Hackney tower

In the centre, a Foster-designed mixed-use tower of 40 storeys is proposed. This would comprise upmarket residential on the top 20 storeys, a layer of serviced flats and a hotel on the remaining floors down to the ground level, totalling 750,000 sq ft (69,676 sq m). There will also be an ancillary social housing scheme.

‘It’s a City fringe site which lends itself to a high-density mix of uses,’ confirms Topel. ‘Realistically, the planning application is three months away and may even be after Christmas.

‘Foster is certainly part of a wider team.

[The scheme] will need to be an attractive environment to attract the very best occupiers, and an integrated development will deliver environmental improvements that will completely change the pitch. When we get there, it will be pretty comprehensive.’

The aerial image (above) shows the north-east fringe of the City’s current limits. Directly north of Broadgate, British Land has already started speculatively developing 201 Bishopsgate and the Broadgate Tower, which will collectively deliver 828,000 sq ft (77,300 sq m) of grade A office space to the market by 2008. Hammerson’s adjoining development site could follow later in the current cycle.

‘The pitch is coming forward, but it’s still not prime,’ Topel says of the area. ‘Where we make money is by changing the pitch. It’s a long-term game but we are generating excitement about the area, [and hope to] win occupiers and secure prelets,’ he says.

Hammerson is also working on plans for the triangular Nicholls & Clarke site on the opposite side of Shoreditch High Street, which has lain derelict for years. In a joint venture with the Corporation of London, an office scheme is planned fronting the main road and residential development, including conversion of listed warehouses, is planned behind. It is expected to total 500,000 sq ft (46,450 sq m).

This site is bounded to the north by Commercial Street, beyond which lies one of Hammerson’s biggest London development sites – the Bishopsgate Goodsyard.

This sprawling site, capable of supporting up to 7m sq ft (650,315 sq m) of development, will host the East London Line’s proposed Bishopsgate Tube station, and – if the capital’s proposed east-west rail link is ever built – a Crossrail interchange.

Although a much longer-term project, early indications suggest office development will occupy the third of the site closest to Shoreditch High Street, while mixed use and residential will stretch along the remaining two-thirds down Bethnal Green Road towards Brick Lane.

The development will have to negotiate the Braithwaite Viaduct, which was listed following protests in 2002, and the eastern mainline running out of nearby Liverpool Street station.

Topel says the nature of development at the goodsyard is ‘tied up with the planning strategy of the London Boroughs of Hackney and Tower Hamlets,’ whose boundaries the site bisects.

‘This area is the logical place for the City to extend,’ says Digby Flower, executive director of CB Richard Ellis, which is advising Hammerson on Northgate jointly with BH2. ‘When Broadgate was developed, it was a no-man’s land. I remember going to see Margaret Thatcher digging the first sod of earth. The first deal to Lehman Brothers was seen as pioneering stuff, but the whole axis of the City changed, running from Bishopsgate down to the Bank of England, as opposed to concentric circles around the Bank.’

‘Hammerson can take on the challenge of this major development and do so successfully,’ says Neal Scambler, partner at BH2. ‘People who think it’s a jungle up there are myopic and unable to grasp how tenants think. It’s a question of space over place.’

Roger Lister, CBRE’s executive director, hopes British Land’s decision to take the plunge on the last site in Broadgate will be ‘sufficient encouragement’ for Hammerson to follow, by developing Northgate within the current development cycle.

‘It is important that development follows sequentially,’ he says. ‘The Broadgate Tower and 201 Bishopsgate are the next pieces in the jigsaw, but this opens the path [for Northgate], which could complete by 2009 or 2010.’

Development proposed on the site opposite could follow in 2010-11, with the goodsyard after that. Allsop is advising Hackney council and DP9 is the planning adviser.

Deeper within the Square Mile, Hammerson has also announced it will start the £110m speculative development of 60 Threadneedle Street – a 221,738 sq ft (20,600 sq m) office scheme, which has a target completion date of the first quarter of 2008. Hammerson’s £160m redevelopment of the former stock exchange, 125 Old Broad Street, is set to complete in December 2007. Stakes have been sold to GE Real Estate and clients of the Bank of Ireland.

The renewed focus on large City development projects stems from Hammerson’s May restructuring, when offices chief Michael Baker left to join Quintain.

‘The London group brings a greater focus to all of our investments and developments and gives it direction,’ Topel says. ‘We have a very simple business now: five core assets, and a very substantial development programme.’
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Old January 15th, 2007, 10:19 AM   #2
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Many thanks London Lad - this is a very exciting area of development. Pushing back geographical boundaries, both real and imagined, is vital if London is to continue its development as a major world city. And it will give me something else to look at out my window when Broadgate Tower is finished!
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Old January 15th, 2007, 11:03 AM   #3
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Excellent...something more to look forward too.
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Old January 15th, 2007, 12:54 PM   #4
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Thank you london lad. I gues that this Northgate development will partially be constructed over the tracks, right? Taken together with the Hammerson scheme, this means trains to Liverpool St Station will run underground from as far as the Bishopsgate Goods Yard, if I have that right. What a change from a good 15 years ago when the track approaching Liverpool Street was all in the open air and that whole area was a junkyard.
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Old January 15th, 2007, 01:41 PM   #5
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although it would be nice if these underground sections were made a bit more interesting, maybe some sort of calming lighting effects for instance
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Old January 15th, 2007, 02:01 PM   #6
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This is the scheme JP Morgan was also interested in along with
Wallbrrok Sq and Riverside South.

It is good news, and another good find Andy, but maybe premature to get too excited about. As usual, it won't be built without first securing tenants
and there many other skyscrapers in the pipeline we have waiting for years
to start construction, multiple planning applications, revisions, etc.(Leadenhall, Bishopsgate, Heron, etc.). Remind when the first renders of the first versions of Leadenhall and Bishopsgate were submitted? It was in the ... nineties or early 00s I think. Actually, some archeological work is needed!
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Old January 15th, 2007, 04:31 PM   #7
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Well, we should see a proper planning report by 2008, approval by 2009, a design change and height restriction by 2010, aquiring tennants by 2011, an inquiry into the tower by Ruth Kelly in 2012, more design changes and height restrictions by 2013, preperation work starting in 2014, building work commencing in 2015, stoppages and delays caused by steel subcontractors and cladding companies going bust in 2016, and final building completion in 2018!

So, this should be an unusually quick one to get up in London!!

I just hope these towers are well designed, they sound like they're in a good location, but as Jef has just said, we've got plenty of skyscrapers in the pipeline to be getting on with in the next few years.

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Old January 16th, 2007, 03:25 AM   #8
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As we any development when it will be built is largly unknown - But considering this hasn't gone in for planning yet & to be on JP Morgans shortlist is impresssive indeed. Its not really premature to get excited though. This should go into planning sometime in the first quarter. Its just the natural scheme of things new schemes are constantly being planned & going in for planning. Most of the developments, large & small under constructionnow have on average had planning permission for around 5years.

Remeber this is a mixed use scheme so the hotel/residential element is not dependant on the office cycle. As the article says it could start in this property cycle but unless JP Morgan take the scheme I cant really see it happeneing.

What is does show is skyscrpaers have largely become accepted in the city & this along with 100 BG are part of the next batch of skyscrapers for the next property cycle.

Looking forward to the renders-hopefully in the not to distant futre.

JGG- As far as I know this site is on derelict land around the railway tunnels/tracks (its all the overgrwon greenery you see on the 201BG webcam to the north)- Im not sure they will be a conrete shelf accross the tracks as was the case for 201 BG.
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Old January 16th, 2007, 10:27 AM   #9
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These a couple of images with the application showing the site & building setting.


201 BG is situated to the bottom right of this site



Looking at the above image the actual scheme doesn't look far off the image that was posted almost a year ago- You can just about make out the taller resi building(3)behind the shorter office building (1).

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Old January 16th, 2007, 11:06 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by london lad View Post

What is does show is skyscrpaers have largely become accepted in the city & this along with 100 BG are part of the next batch of skyscrapers for the next property cycle.

what are you talking about? the city of london has two (and a half) skyscrapers - how exactly does that tell you skyscrapers have become accepted? it's good to have proposals, but as long as they're not (being) built, it doesn't say anything at all.

it looks more like the groundscraper/midrise has been largely accepted in the city...
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Old January 16th, 2007, 11:51 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastender View Post
what are you talking about? the city of london has two (and a half) skyscrapers - how exactly does that tell you skyscrapers have become accepted? it's good to have proposals, but as long as they're not (being) built, it doesn't say anything at all.

it looks more like the groundscraper/midrise has been largely accepted in the city...
What you don't seem to realise is they need to get through planning they first have to be accepted. Heron, Difa, 51Lime St, Swiss re, 201 BG, 122LH, Minerva & LBT not to mention all the skyscrapers built & approved in the docklands have all got planning permission. Now if that isn't acceptance by the city authorities particuraly the corporation of London(who incidentally are quite pro-skyscraper). Considering this same authority would have point blankly refused anything tall pre-1998 then tha'ts quite a turn around in attitude.

What you don't seem to realise, as I was saying tall buildings are now seen as just another type of office block by developers. The first batch of skyscrapers are the ones that should be built in this property cycle. Northgate & 100 BG along with BL planning to increase density on its Broadgate estate from 2012 onwards is a clear indication that developers feel the market & planning enviroment has accepted tall buildings and are already planning for the next property cycle.
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Old January 16th, 2007, 01:12 PM   #12
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I think Eastender meant that the real test is whether skyscrapers are eventually built or not. I totally agree with that statement.

In the City, there is only one true (150m+) skyscraper under construction at the moment (BG Tower). Of course, we all hope to see Leadenhall to start around Q4 2007 and Heron in Q4 2008. We will see. Fingers crossed.
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Old February 13th, 2007, 05:47 PM   #13
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Apparently Keltbray are on site doing some early preparation work for this job.
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Old February 13th, 2007, 06:17 PM   #14
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Keltbray are everywhere!
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Old February 13th, 2007, 06:30 PM   #15
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How tall do you guys think these will be? 165m office and 155m resi?
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Old February 13th, 2007, 06:57 PM   #16
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I believe it will be much shorter.
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Old February 13th, 2007, 08:44 PM   #17
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Following the 50% letting of 201 Bishopsgate, 122 Leadenhall is looking very very likely. What fantastic news... even if Bishopsgate Tower doesn't get built in the near future the City will have a great skyline with Heron and 122 Leadenhall built
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Old February 13th, 2007, 09:32 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dom View Post
Following the 50% letting of 201 Bishopsgate, 122 Leadenhall is looking very very likely. What fantastic news... even if Bishopsgate Tower doesn't get built in the near future the City will have a great skyline with Heron and 122 Leadenhall built

No reason to worry. The current climate in the financial industry will continue for a while (the reasons for which I can explain in another thread if you wish), so IMO all three towers will be up in the next five years. Easy financing and investment case. The most important macro factors are actually not the business climate in the financial industry but the willingness of the government to invest in transport links (Thameslink and Crossrail). If the latter does not come trough expect more delocalized projects away from the City and CW. Yet, still at a net loss to London. We are hiring a lot of people outside of London now for exactly that reason. London's limitations are the speed of real estate development (or rather the lack thereof) and transport. The Crossrail and Thameslink factors take crucial roles righ now in any model because they determine pretty much the possible expansion of the workforce. CW and the City cannot take more people (and hence skyscrapers) without these two transport projects sorted out. People do not only need a place to work, but also a place to live, and central London is out of the question for most new hires so it is matter of allowing them to spread out over a reasonable area within a reasonable commute (our benchmark is 45 mins). Try Thameslink today. Or the Central or Jubilee lines. All of these are well over capacity.

Last edited by JGG; February 13th, 2007 at 09:38 PM.
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Old February 13th, 2007, 10:40 PM   #19
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JGG is right, though I'd be a lot happier if I could see Heron or 122LH rising!

I think this is good news, even if only to bolster the confidence of those with planning permission that if they don't get a move on, others are waiting in the wings to snap up pre-lets and overtake them.
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Old February 14th, 2007, 10:17 AM   #20
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Thanks for the analysis, JGG. But - the news today is about the end of the commercial property boom (at least, according to some folks). I wonder if, with returns either flattening out, or at least rising far more slowly than in the recent past, we can assume a continued high level of investment in this sector, particularly the riskier end, i.e. skyscrapers?
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