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Old June 4th, 2013, 03:53 PM   #3041
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"ZARECHNAYA"

"Zarechnaya" ("Beyond the River") is a future station on the Line 1 of the Omsk Metro. It will be located near the Konev Street not far from its intersection with 70 Years of October Street, in the Kirovsky Administrative District.

The station is named due to its location at the left-bank part of city, 1.5 km from shoreline of the Irtysh River. In 1980s, it had project name "Levoberezhnaya" ("Left-Bank"). The Irtysh River is a river in Siberia and Kazakhstan and is the chief tributary of the Ob River. Irtysh's main affluent is the Tobol River. The Ob-Irtysh forms a major drainage basin in Asia, encompassing most of Western Siberia and the Altai Mountains. From its origins as the Kara-Irtysh (Black Irtysh) in the Mongolian Altay mountains in Xinjiang, China, the Irtysh flows north-west through Lake Zaysan in Kazakhstan, meeting the Ishim and Tobol Rivers before merging with the Ob near Khanty-Mansiysk in western Siberia, Russia after 4248 kilometres (2640 miles).

A number of Mongol and Turkic peoples occupied the river banks for many centuries. In the 15th and 16th centuries the lower and middle courses of the Irtysh lay within the Tatar Khanate of Sibir, which the Russians conquered in the 1580s. In the 17th century the Zunghar Khanate, formed by the Mongol Oirat people, became Russia's southern neighbor, and controlled the upper Irtysh. The Russians founded the cities of Omsk in 1716, Semipalatinsk in 1718, Ust-Kamenogorsk in 1720 and Petropavlovsk in 1752. The Chinese Qing Empire conquered the Zunghar state in the 1750s. The border between the Russian and the Qing empires (the present border between Russia and Kazakhstan in the north and Mongolia and China in the south) was settled in the early 19th century. The Irtysh River serves as a backdrop in the epilogue of Fyodor Dostoyevsky's novel "Crime and Punishment". Major cities on the Irtysh River, from source to mouth, include: in China - Fuyun and Burqin; in Kazakhstan - Öskemen (Ust-Kamenogorsk), Semey (Semipalatinsk) and Pavlodar; in Russia - Omsk, Tara, Tobolsk and Khanty-Mansiysk.

Tankers and passenger and freight boats navigate the river between April and October, when it does not freeze over. Omsk, home to the headquarters of the state-owned Irtysh River Shipping Company, functions as the largest river-port in Western Siberia. On the Kazakhstan territory there are 3 major hydroelectric plants on Irtysh: at Serebryansk, Ust-Kamenogorsk and Shulbinsk. The world's deepest lock, with a drop of 42 metres, allows river traffic to by-pass the dam at Ust-Kamenogorsk. Some of the Northern river reversal proposals, widely discussed in the 1960s and 1970s, would have seen the direction of flow of the Irtysh reversed so as to supply water to central Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. While these gigantic water management schemes were not implemented, a smaller Irtysh-Karaganda irrigation canal was built between 1962 and 1974 to supply water to the dry Kazakh steppes and to one of the country's main industrial centers, Karaganda. In 2002, pipelines were constructed to supply water from the canal to the Ishim River and Kazakhstan's capital, Astana. In the 2000s, projects for diverting a significant amounts of Irtysh water within China, such as the proposed Black Irtysh - Karamai Canal, have been decried by Kazakh and Russian environmentalists.

In beginning of 2006 there was finished construction of the left tunnels between future Metro stations "Biblioteka imeni Pushkina" and "Zarechnaya". On June 22, 2006 was finished construction of the right tunnels between these stations. The distance between "Biblioteka imeni Pushkina" and "Zarechnaya" is 2100 metres. On May 28, 2007 there was started construction of the 1.551-km long left tunnel between future Metro stations "Kristall" and "Zarechnaya" with using of obsolete Soviet TBM KT-5.6. The construction was very difficult due to high level of groundwaters in this area. On May 27, 2008 this tunnel was flooded as a result of damage of water pipe at the Komarov Avenue. It took few weeks for complete elimination of consequences. Unfortunatly, Soviet TBM KT-5.6 was seriously damaged without possibility of restoring.

In 2008 there began construction of the foundation pit of the station. On June 24, 2011 there was started construction of the 1.534-km long right tunnel between future Metro stations "Kristall" and "Zarechnaya" with using of modern TBM "Om" ("Lovat RME238SE"). It was finished on August 6, 2012. On October 8, 2012 there was started construction of the remaining 0.644-km long part of the left tunnel from "Zarechnaya" in direction to "Kristall" with using of same TBM (0.888-km long part of this tunnel was dug in 2007-2008). The construction of the left tunnel was completed on February 1, 2013.

The architects of the station are Alexander Gatsenko and Nikolay Shumakov. "Zarechnaya" will be shallow single-vaulted station. There are plans to install platform screen doors at this station. The platform of station will be located along the Konev Street. According to new project, there will built one underground vestibule with exits to the both sides of this street.


Александр Пальшин

The old/new project:

omskplan

The old/new project:

omskplan
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Old June 4th, 2013, 03:54 PM   #3042
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July 28, 2012. The construction of Metro station "Zarechnaya" ("Beyond the River"):

Tram Racer

August 6, 2012. The end of construction of the 1.534-km long right tunnel between future Metro stations "Kristall" and "Zarechnaya":

superomsk


sdelanounas


infokanal55


sdelanounas

October 8, 2012. The beginning of construction of the remaining 0.644-km long part of the left tunnel from "Zarechnaya" in direction to "Kristall" - it was finished on February 1, 2013:

Mostovik


Mostovik


Mostovik
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Old June 4th, 2013, 03:55 PM   #3043
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"KRISTALL"

"Kristall" ("Crystal") is a future station on the Line 1 of the Omsk Metro. It will be located near the intersection of the Komarov Avenue and Boulevard of the Architects, in the Kirovsky Administrative District.

The station is named after microdistrict "Kristall" which located nearby. Prior September 2005, the station had project name "Bulvar Arkhitektorov" ("Boulevard of the Architects") due to location near the eponymous boulevard.

On May 28, 2007 there was started construction of the 1.551-km long left tunnel between future Metro stations "Kristall" and "Zarechnaya" with using of obsolete Soviet TBM KT-5.6. The construction was very difficult due to high level of groundwaters in this area. On May 27, 2008 this tunnel was flooded as a result of damage of water pipe at the Komarov Avenue. It took few weeks for complete elimination of consequences. Unfortunatly, Soviet TBM KT-5.6 was seriously damaged without possibility of restoring. In 2011 there began construction of the foundation pit of the station. On June 24, 2011 there was started construction of the 1.534-km long right tunnel between future Metro stations "Kristall" and "Zarechnaya" with using of modern TBM "Om" ("Lovat RME238SE"). It was finished on August 6, 2012. On October 8, 2012 there was started construction of the remaining 0.644-km long part of the left tunnel from "Zarechnaya" in direction to "Kristall" with using of same TBM (0.888-km long part of this tunnel was dug in 2007-2008). The construction of the left tunnel was completed on February 1, 2013.

The architects of the station are Alexander Gatsenko and Nikolay Shumakov. "Kristall" will be shallow single-vaulted station. The form of its vault will be remind about crystals. There are plans to install platform screen doors at this station. The platform of station will be located along the Komarov Avenue. According to new project, there will built one underground vestibule with four exits to the all sides of the intersection of the Komarov Avenue and Boulevard of the Architects.


Александр Пальшин

The old/new project:

omskplan

The old/new project:

omskplan
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Old June 4th, 2013, 03:56 PM   #3044
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February 14, 2012. The construction of Metro station "Kristall" ("Crystal"):



Night Hunter

July 26, 2012:

Eugney


Eugney


Eugney


Eugney


Eugney

September 23, 2012:

Eugney


Eugney


Eugney
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Old June 4th, 2013, 03:57 PM   #3045
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"SOBORNAYA"

"Sobornaya" ("Cathedral") is a future station on the Line 1 of the Omsk Metro. It will be located near the intersection of the Komarov Avenue and Perelyot Street, between the Bus Terminal and Left-Bank Market, in the Kirovsky Administrative District.

The station is named after the Christmas Cathedral which located nearby. This cathedral was built in 1990s and was opened on January 7, 2001 (on the Orthodox Christmas Day). Prior September 2005, the station had project name "Avtovokzal" ("Bus Terminal") due to location near the Bus Terminal. There are located hotel, residential areas and multi-purpose Omsk Arena near the future station.

The preparation works at the construction site were started in June 2007. The construction of this station is not started yet.

The architects of the station are Alexander Gatsenko and Nikolay Shumakov. "Sobornaya" will be shallow single-vaulted station. The station will be made in red and white colors - the traditional colors in the architecture of the Russian cathedrals. The nine niches of the vault of station will be remind the domes of cathedrals. Each niche will contain ten light fixtures. The platform of station will be located along the Komarov Avenue. According to new project, there will built one underground vestibule with three exits to the both sides of this avenue.


omskplan


AlexP

The old/new project:

omskplan

The old/new project:

omskplan

February 10, 2013. The construction site of Metro station "Sobornaya" ("Cathedral"):

AlexP


AlexP

2013. Christmas Cathedral:

Ponyuhova


Ponyuhova


Ponyuhova
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Old June 4th, 2013, 03:57 PM   #3046
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"ROKOSSOVSKOGO"

"Rokossovskogo" ("Konstantin Rokossovsky") is a future western terminal station on the Line 1 of the Omsk Metro. It will be located near the intersection of the Fugenfirov Street and Rokossovsky Street, in the Kirovsky Administrative District.

The station is named after the Rokossovsky Street which located nearby. This street is named after great Soviet military commander of Polish origin Konstantin Rokossovsky (1896-1968) who became a Marshal of the Soviet Union, a Marshal of Poland and served as Poland's Defence Minister. He was among the most prominent Red Army commanders of WWII, especially renowned for his planning and executing of Belorussian Strategic Offensive Operation "Bagration" (1944), one of the most decisive Soviet Army successes of the War.

Rokossovsky was born on December 21, 1896 in Warsaw, then part of the Russian Empire. His family had moved to Warsaw with the appointment of his father as the inspector of the Warsaw Railways. The Rokossovsky family was a member of the Polish nobility, and over generations had produced many cavalry officers. However, Konstantin's father, Ksawery Rokossowski, was a railway official in Russia and his Russian mother was a teacher. Orphaned at 14, Rokossovsky earned a living by working in a stocking factory, and some time later he became an apprentice stonemason. On August 15, 1914, at the start of the First World War, he volunteered to serve in the 5th Kargopol Dragoon Regiment. Rokossovsky soon showed himself a talented soldier and leader; he ended the war in the rank of a junior non-commissioned officer, serving in the cavalry throughout the war. He was wounded twice during the war and awarded the Cross of St. George. In 1917, he joined the Bolshevik Party and soon thereafter, entered the ranks of the Red Army. During the Russian Civil War of 1917-1922, he commanded a cavalry squadron of the Kargopol Red Guards Cavalry Detachment in the campaigns against the White Guard armies of Admiral Alexander Kolchak (1874-1920) in the Urals. Rokossovsky received Soviet Russia's highest (at the time) military decoration, the Order of the Red Banner.

In 1921 Rokossovsky commanded the 35th Independent Cavalry Regiment stationed in Irkutsk and played an important role in bringing Damdin Sükhbaatar (1893-1923), the founder of the Mongolian People's Republic, to power in Ulan Bator. It was here that he met his wife Yuliya Barmina, whom he married in 1923. Their daughter Ariadna was born in 1925. In 1924 and 1925 he attended the Leningrad Higher Cavalry School and then returned to Mongolia where he was a trainer for the Mongolian People's Army. Soon after, while serving in the Special Red Banner Eastern Army under leadership of Vasily Blyukher (1889-1938), he took part in the Russo-Chinese Chinese Eastern Railroad War of 1929 when the Soviet Union intervened to return the Chinese Eastern Railway to joint Chinese and Soviet administration, after Chinese warlord Zhang Xueliang (1901-2001) of the Republic of China attempted to seize complete control of the railway. Rokossovsky was among the first to realise the potential of armoured assault. He was an early supporter of the creation of a strong armoured corps for the Red Army, as championed by Marshal Mikhail Tukhachevsky (1893-1937) in his theory of "deep operations".

Rokossovsky held senior commands until 1937, when he became caught up in Joseph Stalin's Great Purge and accused of being a Polish spy. His association with the cutting edge methods of Marshal Tukhachevsky may have been the real cause of his conflict with more traditional officers such as Marshal Semyon Budyonny (1883-1973), who still favoured cavalry tactics, and whose policy disagreements with Tukhachevsky triggered the Great Purge of the Red Army, which resulted in the execution of the latter and many others. Rokossovsky, however, survived. It is reported that he escaped the fate of so many other officers caught up in the purge by proving to the court that the officer whom his accusers claimed had denounced him had been killed in 1920 during the Russian Civil War. According to Russian writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn (1918-2008), he endured two mock shooting ceremonies where people were shot dead around him. After his trial Rokossovsky was sent to the "Kresty" Prison in Leningrad, where he remained until he was released without explanation on March 22, 1940. Marshal Semyon Timoshenko (1895-1970), who had been named People's Commissar for Defence of the Soviet Union after the debacle of the Winter War of 1939-1940 and was in desperate need of experienced officers to fill command posts for the rapidly expanding Soviet Army, returned Rokossovsky to the command of the 5th Cavalry Corps at the rank of Colonel. Subsequently he was soon promoted to the rank of a Major General and given the command of the 9th Mechanised Corps under leadership of Mikhail Kirponos in the Kiev Military Region, which would later be renamed the Southwestern Front at the outbreak of hostilities with Germany.

When Germany attacked the Soviet Union in June 1941, Rokossovsky was serving as the commander of the 9th Mechanised Corps, where his command participated in the Battle of Dubno - an early Soviet counter-attack that ended in the destruction of most of the participating Soviet forces against Gerd von Rundstedt's Army Group South in the Ukraine. As the counter-attack progressed German resistance stiffened; Mikhail Kirponos (1892-1941), the commander of the Southwestern Front, initially issued instructions to cease offensive operations and then argued with Chief of General Staff Georgy Zhukov (1896-1974), when Zhukov insisted that the counter-attack continue. As a result Rokossovsky's command was bombarded with conflicting orders, and Rokossovsky "expressed no ambivalence about the proposed counteroffensive". Despite this insubordination Timoshenko brought Rokossovsky to Smolensk in July, in an effort to prevent the fall of the city during the Battle of Smolensk of 1941. He was given the unenviable task of cobbling together the remnants of Dmitry Pavlov's Western Front, which had collapsed under the weight of the attack by the Wehrmacht's Army Group Centre during the Battle of Białystok–Minsk. With a limited force of 90 tanks and two rifle regiments, four artillery regiments and elements of the 38th Rifle Division, he is credited with blunting the advance of Field Marshal Fedor von Bock's 7th Panzer, 17th Panzer and 20th Motorized Division at Vyazma, Smolensk Region and allowing numerous Soviet soldiers to escape encirclement. In September 1941 Stalin personally appointed Rokossovsky to the command of 16th Army, which was the first Soviet army group composed entirely of soldiers serving in shtrafbats (Soviet penal battalions). Rokossovsky's army was ordered to defend the approaches to Moscow, and was now under the direct command of General Georgy Zhukov, his former subordinate. The 16th Army (later renamed the 11th Guards Army) played a key role in the Battle of Moscow when it was deployed along the main axis of the German advance along the Volokolamsk Highway that was a central junction of the bitter fighting during the German winter offensive of 1941 (Operation "Typhoon"), as well as the subsequent Soviet counter-attack of 1941-1942. Throughout Operation "Typhoon", Rokossovsky's 16th Army had taken the brunt of the German effort to capture Moscow.

On March 8, 1942 Rokossovsky was badly injured by a shell splinter. He spent two months in a Moscow hospital and was transferred to the Bryansk Front to take up command of the 16th Army once more. He commanded the right flank of the Soviet forces as they fell back before the Germans towards the Don River and Stalingrad in the summer of 1942. During the Battle of Stalingrad of 1942-1943, Rokossovsky, commanding the Don Front, led the northern wing of the Soviet counter-attack that encircled Friedrich Paulus' Sixth Army and won the decisive victory of the Soviet-German war. In 1943, after becoming commander of the Central Front, Rokossovsky successfully conducted defensive operations in the Kursk Salient, and then led the counterattack west of Kursk which defeated the last major German offensive on the eastern front and allowed the Soviet armies to advance to Kiev. The Central Front was then renamed 1st Belorussian Front, which he commanded during the Soviet advance through Belorussia (Belarus) and into Poland. In a famous incident during the planning in 1944 of Belorussian Strategic Offensive Operation "Bagration", Rokossovsky disagreed with Stalin, who demanded in accordance with Soviet war practice a single break-through of the German frontline. Rokossovsky held firm in his argument for two points of break-through. As a result, Stalin ordered the attack to go forward according to Rokossovsky's plan. The operation was very successful and Rokossovsky's reputation was assured. After crushing German Army Group Centre in Belarus, Rokossovsky's armies reached the east bank of the Vistula River opposite Warsaw by mid-1944. For these victories he gained the rank of Marshal of the Soviet Union. In November 1944, Rokossovsky was transferred to the 2nd Belorussian Front, which advanced into East Prussia and then across northern Poland to the mouth of the Oder at Stettin (now Szczecin). At the end of April he linked up with British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery's forces in northern Germany while the forces of Georgy Zhukov and Marshal Ivan Konev (1897-1973) captured Berlin.

As one of the most prominent Soviet military commanders of the Second World War, Rokossovsky was present at the Victory Parade in Red Square in Moscow on June 24, 1945, riding on a black stallion next to Marshal Georgy Zhukov. After the end of the war Rokossovsky remained in command of Soviet forces in Poland (Northern Group of Forces). In October 1949, with the establishment of a fully Communist government under Bolesław Bierut (1892-1956) in Poland, Rokossovsky, on Stalin's orders, became the Polish Minister of National Defense, with the additional title of Marshal of Poland. In 1952 he became Deputy Chairman of the Council of Ministers of the People's Republic of Poland. Although Rokossovsky was nominally Polish, he had not lived in Poland for 35 years, and most Poles regarded him as a Russian and Soviet emissary in the country. As Rokossovsky himself bitterly put it: "In Russia, they say I'm a Pole, in Poland they call me Russian". He returned to the Soviet Union, which restored his Soviet ranks and honours; and in July 1957, following the removal from office of Defence Minister Zhukov, Nikita Khrushchev appointed him Deputy Minister of Defence and Commander of the Transcaucasian Military District. In 1958 he became chief inspector of the Ministry of Defence, a post he held until his retirement in April 1962. He died from cancer on August 3, 1968, aged 71. His ashes were buried in the Kremlin Wall Necropolis on Red Square.

Among his numerous awards are Order of Victory (1945), Gold Star of the Hero of Soviet Union (1944, 1945), Order of Suvorov of 1st class (1943), Order of Kutuzov of 1st class (1943), British Order of the Bath (1945), French Legion of Honour (1945) and American Legion of Merit (1945), etc.

In 2010 it was announced that Metro station "Rokossovskogo" (as well as part of Metro segment "Sobornaya" - "Rokossovskogo") will be built over the ground. The construction of this station is not started yet.

June 24, 1945. Marshal Kontantin Rokossovsky (on a black stallion) was parade commander at the first Victory Parade in Moscow:

dp60

July 12, 1945. Marshal Konstantin Rokossovsky (right in a front row), together with Marshal Georgy Zhukov (1896-1974), British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976), Army General Vasily Sokolovsky (1897-1968) and Colonel-General Mikhail Malinin (1899-1960) are walking at Berlin street near Brandenburg Gate after ceremony of the awarding the British Order of the Bath:

waralbum

The project of Metro station "Rokossovskogo" ("Konstantin Rokossovsky"):

omskplan

METRO DEPOT №1

Metro depot №1 is a future depot of the Omsk Metro. It will be located near the intersection of the Rokossovsky Street and Lukashevich Street, in the Kirovsky Administrative District. It will be situated near the future Metro station "Sobornaya" and will be serve future Line 1.

According to old project, the planned area of Metro depot was 16 hectares in order to serve four-car trains. According to new project, there will be operate two-car (possibly - three-car) trains at the planned automated lines of the Omsk Metro. Therefore, the planned area of Omsk Metro depot was decreased to 8.4 hectares. However, the new project is still not approved. Currently it passes the approval process for compliance with Russian standards.

The preparation works at the construction site were started in 2006. The construction of this Metro depot is not started yet.

July 9, 2012. The construction site of Metro depot №1 near the Lukashevich Street:

X-Rayder

The old project (area of 16 hectares) / new project (area of 8.4 hectares):

omskplan
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Old June 4th, 2013, 03:58 PM   #3047
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FURTHER DEVELOPMENT - NEXT STAGES

Plans call for the line to be extended on the right bank of the Irtysh River to Metro station "Rabochaya" (the segment between Metro stations "Tupolevskaya" and "Rabochaya" is partially completed). The first line is planned to have 11 stations and a total length of 13.6 km, with an additional Metro bridge over the Om River. When the line is complete, it is expected to have a daily ridership of 330.000 passengers.

The construction of the Line 2 will start after 2015. It will go on the right bank of the Irtysh, mostly parallel to the river. Transfer to the first line will be available at "Torgovy Tsentr". This line is expected to have twenty stations. At the same time, the first line is planned to be extended on the left bank by four stations.

The third line will not be built until the distant future. If built, it will likely be on both banks of the Irtysh River, like the first line.

The perspective scheme of the Omsk Metro. The pink section - the first stage; red/yellow - second stage:

omskplan
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Old June 4th, 2013, 04:01 PM   #3048
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THE PROJECTS OF METRO STATIONS OF THE NEXT STAGES:

The project of two-level Metro station "Torgovy Tsentr" ("Trade Center"):

omskplan


omskplan


omskplan

The project of over-ground Metro stations "Molodyozhnaya" ("Youth"), "Solnechnaya" ("Sunny"), "Zapadnaya" ("Western") and "Zakhlaminskaya":

omskplan


omskplan

The project of ground-level Metro stations "Tyukalinskaya" and "Goryachy Klyuch" ("Hot Spring"):

omskplan

The project of ground-level Metro station "Druzhino":

omskplan
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Old June 4th, 2013, 04:02 PM   #3049
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ROSTOV-ON-DON

December 22, 2012. The geodetic works at the Greater Garden Street near planned Metro station "Budyonnovskaya" ("Semyon Budyonny"). Of course, it does not mean that Metro construction in Rostov-on-Don will be started in near or distant future. Currently, regional authorities have no enough money for realization of this project. But let these interesting photos will remain for the history:

Rostov-Today


Rostov-Today


Rostov-Today
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Old June 4th, 2013, 04:02 PM   #3050
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OTHER RUSSIAN CITIES

Unfortunatly, the situation with construction of Metro systems in Chelyabinsk and Krasnoyarsk practically didn't changed since my last year's reports:
Chelyabinsk Metro
Krasnoyarsk Metro

The only positive news is that uncompleted tunnels of Chelyabinsk Metro were not damaged as a result of world-famous fall of the Chelyabinsk meteor on February 15, 2013.

P.S. Uffff.... At last, I finished to write about events of last year and plans for near future. I started to write this set of posts prior to New Year celebrations. During two previous years, it was necessary for me no more than 1.5 months to complete similar work. But last year there happened so many events and appeared so many plans that it took 5 months to write about all this in details. I hope that my posts were not too long and boring, and that next year such job will be ended before early June
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Old June 4th, 2013, 04:28 PM   #3051
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Thank you very much, Aleksey! If it wasn't for you and your fellow countrymen we wouldn't know so much about what's going on with Russia's infrastructural projects.
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Old June 5th, 2013, 10:13 AM   #3052
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Isn't Krasnoyarsk Metro is officially dead?

And in Omsk, I suppose, the best solution should be the Volgograd-style metrotram (later convertable to metro if needed) - the isolated metro is just too expensive and would take years to connstuct, and AFAIK it's a complete "overkill" in terms of ridership.
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Old June 5th, 2013, 03:53 PM   #3053
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlekseyVT View Post
FUTURE RUSSIAN METRO SYSTEMS - OMSK
Sorry, I have to do this

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Old June 5th, 2013, 06:37 PM   #3054
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XAN_ View Post
Isn't Krasnoyarsk Metro is officially dead?
Factually, yes. Did I claimed otherwise?

Quote:
Originally Posted by XAN_ View Post
And in Omsk, I suppose, the best solution should be the Volgograd-style metrotram (later convertable to metro if needed) - the isolated metro is just too expensive and would take years to connstuct, and AFAIK it's a complete "overkill" in terms of ridership.
As I remember, we discussed it not so long ago. It's like proposal to buy bicycle instead of car. Of course, Metro construction demands money but it's able to solve many potential problems in the future. Metro construction in Omsk passed point of no return and will be opened sooner or later.

I saw rolling stock and condition of tram infrastructure in Omsk. The half of rolling stock are outdated Soviet-made KTM-5 tramcars. Why do you think that it will operate better and it's more comfortable in conditions of harsh Siberian climate (especially during snowfalls)? And, that is more important - will be federal authorities finance this project such as they finances Metro construction (one billion rubles per year)?

Speaking in general, I'm not against construction of LRT in Russian cities where are no technical possibilities or money to build Metro lines. But not as alternative of half-completed Metro systems.
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Old June 5th, 2013, 08:46 PM   #3055
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Factually, yes. Did I claimed otherwise?
Oh, I just wanted to clarify if it is, because I wasn't sure

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As I remember, we discussed it not so long ago. It's like proposal to buy bicycle instead of car. Of course, Metro construction demands money but it's able to solve many potential problems in the future. Metro construction in Omsk passed point of no return and will be opened sooner or later.
Yes, and that's the point... If you are living in warm climate and you don't need to transport bulky items for 50 km every day, and you are low on money - than buying a bicycle instead of car is the best idea ever. The same goes for metro vs LRT - metro can be justified at 20 000+ passangers/hour. It seems, Omsk metro won't transport so many until the entire line 1 is opened, and that would be in... 20 years? 25? 30? That hell lot of time (and money).
Correct me if I'm wrong, but the only completed parts are metrobridge and 2 adjacent stations?

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Originally Posted by AlekseyVT View Post
I saw rolling stock and condition of tram infrastructure in Omsk. The half of rolling stock are outdated Soviet-made KTM-5 tramcars. Why do you think that it will operate better and it's more comfortable in conditions of harsh Siberian climate (especially during snowfalls)? And, that is more important - will be federal authorities finance this project such as they finances Metro construction (one billion rubles per year)?
Well, the new rolling stock should be bought in both scenarios (LRT vs Metro). AFAIK, federal funding was awarded to Volgograd metrotram extension, so I don't see why shouldn't it be awarded to Omsk one.
And about snowfalls - Luke, use the force snowploughs. Many cities with regular snowfalls use trams. Omsk is a bit harsher, but that only means running snowploughs for 5 months instead of 3.

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Speaking in general, I'm not against construction of LRT in Russian cities where are no technical possibilities or money to build Metro lines. But not as alternative of half-completed Metro systems.
AFAIK, there is no metro-specific works (eg. depots, third rail, signalling, etc.) completed in Omsk, and with the latest corrections they are moving to the tramway-like system with 2-car trains, shorter platforms etc... It's really puzzling, why in the hell they will want an isolated short undeground tramway, when it's possible to do it Volgograd style to build vast combined (undeground+surface) network for half price.
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Old June 5th, 2013, 09:28 PM   #3056
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Yes, and that's the point... If you are living in warm climate and you don't need to transport bulky items for 50 km every day, and you are low on money - than buying a bicycle instead of car is the best idea ever.
If I will use ground public transport in Moscow instead of Metro, it would necessary for me to spend three hours for my daily one-way trips to the place of work instead of one hour.

Instead of Metro, ground public transport depends from general road traffic and width of streets.

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The same goes for metro vs LRT - metro can be justified at 20 000+ passangers/hour. It seems, Omsk metro won't transport so many until the entire line 1 is opened, and that would be in... 20 years? 25? 30? That hell lot of time (and money).
Correct me if I'm wrong, but the only completed parts are metrobridge and 2 adjacent stations?
Metrobridge and one adjacent station.

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Well, the new rolling stock should be bought in both scenarios (LRT vs Metro).
How about regular maintance of overhead wires and tram rails? Unfortunatly, quality of construction of the new tramlines in Russian cities (in Kazan and Yekaterinburg) are not on best level. So, I have doubts that it will different in the case of Omsk.

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AFAIK, federal funding was awarded to Volgograd metrotram extension, so I don't see why shouldn't it be awarded to Omsk one.
Because Volgograd Metrotram exists since 1984, there is no necessary to construct it from scratch. Of course, the opening of new Metro system would be more attractive and prestigious event in the eyes of politicans than opening of new tram routes.

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And about snowfalls - Luke, use the force snowploughs. Many cities with regular snowfalls use trams. Omsk is a bit harsher, but that only means running snowploughs for 5 months instead of 3.
As show practice of recent years, daily passenger traffic in regional Metro systems (like Novosibirsk, Nizhny Novgorod, Samara and Kazan) significally increases every time after arrival of winter.

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AFAIK, there is no metro-specific works (eg. depots, third rail, signalling, etc.) completed in Omsk, and with the latest corrections they are moving to the tramway-like system with 2-car trains, shorter platforms etc... It's really puzzling, why in the hell they will want an isolated short undeground tramway, when it's possible to do it Volgograd style to build vast combined (undeground+surface) network for half price.
So, why this Metrotram will be significally different from current Metro project? In any way, it will be necessary to build tunnels and underground platforms.

Metro system will be always attractive because it fully isolated from rest of city traffic. In contrast, in Russian realities, tramlines are depends from road traffic and can't provide such fast operation.

Really, in recent years there were many proposals and projects for construction of the lines of Metrotram or fast tram about in 20 (!!!) Russian cities. However, due to various reasons, it was not built anywhere.

P.S. As I recently realized, TBM "Om" ("Lovat RME238SE") was moved from Omsk to Moscow. Since April 24, 2013, it operates at the construction of the Third Interchange Contour of the Moscow Metro. So, it's more likely that the opening of Omsk Metro will be delayed again
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Old June 7th, 2013, 12:05 AM   #3057
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If I will use ground public transport in Moscow instead of Metro, it would necessary for me to spend three hours for my daily one-way trips to the place of work instead of one hour.
a) Moscow is much biggger and denser city
b) Tram on it's own right of way doesn't depend on traffic or street width

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Metrobridge and one adjacent station.
Well, that means that there is no need to finish this project as 100% underground metro.

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How about regular maintance of overhead wires and tram rails? Unfortunatly, quality of construction of the new tramlines in Russian cities (in Kazan and Yekaterinburg) are not on best level. So, I have doubts that it will different in the case of Omsk.
Well, railway and metros somehow manage to build a good tracks, so inviting railway or subway construction teams will work - like they did in Kyiv during (re)construction of Rapid Tram.

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Because Volgograd Metrotram exists since 1984, there is no necessary to construct it from scratch. Of course, the opening of new Metro system would be more attractive and prestigious event in the eyes of politicans than opening of new tram routes.
Yes, metro is all that shiny and prestigious, but city just don't have extra money for all that shininess and prestigiousness.

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So, why this Metrotram will be significally different from current Metro project? In any way, it will be necessary to build tunnels and underground platforms.
Yes, but the current project would be a tiny isolated stretch of 4 stations, while the metrotram could be expanded through the entire city with minimal funds and time(new surface lines, modernising existing or abandoned tram lines)

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Metro system will be always attractive because it fully isolated from rest of city traffic. In contrast, in Russian realities, tramlines are depends from road traffic and can't provide such fast operation
Ukrainian realities seams do be even more chaotic and depressing, but the kerb and railway-style bare-sleepers track are doing the trick just fine. If that not enough you can add a small fence, a-la Volgograd style.
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Old June 7th, 2013, 12:50 AM   #3058
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a) Moscow is much biggger and denser city
Right. So, what it means? Almost all European cities with population of more than 1 million residents have Metro systems.

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b) Tram on it's own right of way doesn't depend on traffic or street width
The tramlines does not exist in the airspace. It will be have interchange with road streets.

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Well, that means that there is no need to finish this project as 100% underground metro.
Why you against Metro? This project have no significant difference from your beloved Metrotram.

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Well, railway and metros somehow manage to build a good tracks, so inviting railway or subway construction teams will work - like they did in Kyiv during (re)construction of Rapid Tram.
Can you name me list of Russian cities where are no problems with condition of tram system? At least, Metro tracks are isolated from weather conditions and can be better preserved. Again, who will pay to this team?

Don't forget that Kiev is a capital of European country while Omsk is a 8th populous Russian city. And Rapid Tram in Kiev is addition to Metro, not its alternative. There are plans to continue extension of Kiev Metro.

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Yes, metro is all that shiny and prestigious, but city just don't have extra money for all that shininess and prestigiousness.
I can repeat again - the project of fast tram is not attractive for federal authorities. For this reason, they will no finance its construction as they fund Metro.

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Yes, but the current project would be a tiny isolated stretch of 4 stations, while the metrotram could be expanded through the entire city with minimal funds and time (new surface lines, modernising existing or abandoned tram lines)
The current project provide cross-river transportation, with construction of ground-level stations in the future. Due to presence of intersections with road street, tram will never provide fast transportation with intervals of 3-5 minutes as in Metro. In order to avoid these intersections, it's need to build underground or over-ground stations for lines of fast tram. As result, it will no different from current Metro project.
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Old June 7th, 2013, 12:24 PM   #3059
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MOSCOW TRAM

May 25, 2013. The transportation of new 71-623-02 tramcar at the Seamen's Silence Street:

Андрей Дем

May 25, 2013. The beginning of restoration of the tramline at the Volokolamsk Highway (dismantled in October 2008 due to reconstruction of the Volokolamsk and Leningrad Highways):

makfan

May 26, 2013. The beginning of restoration of the tramline at the St. Tryphon Street (closed in November 1995 due to reconstruction of the Cross Bridge):

makfan

June 4, 2013. The restoration of the tramline at the St. Tryphon Street:

Артём Светлов
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Old June 7th, 2013, 11:55 PM   #3060
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Why were the seamen silent on this particular street in the Russian capital?
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