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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:09 PM   #3521
geometarkv
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1925-1926. Tramcars on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square):

oldmos

1925, Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square). The solemn funerals of Bolshevik statesmen Ephraim Sklyansky and Isai Khurgin:

oldmos

1926. Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square), view from Grand Theatre:

Izus67

1926-1928. Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square):

oldmos
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:10 PM   #3522
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1927, tramcar at Theatre Driveway, tram route №6. Kitay-gorod wall and Vladimir Church (right):

oldmos

1924-1930. Tram train near Grand Theatre:

oldmos

1925-1930. Tram trains on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square):

oldmos

1929. Tram trains near House of the Unions:

oldmos

1929-1930. Tramcars on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square):

oldmos

1927-1929. Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square):

oldmos
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:10 PM   #3523
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1929-1931. Grand Theatre:

oldmos

1930. Joseph Stalin and Sergey Kirov go from 16th Congress of the All-Union Communist Party (Bolsheviks):

oldmos

1930-1935. Theatre Driveway:

ARTём

1930. BF tramcar №51 (constructed in 1928 at Kolomna Plant) on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square), tram route №6:

leha71

1925-1935. Tram train near Hotel "Metropol":

oldmos

1930. Grand Theatre in year of the 16th Congress of the All-Union Communist Party (Bolsheviks):

oldmos

1931. Tram train near House of the Unions:

oldmos
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:11 PM   #3524
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1932. Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square), view from Grand Theatre:

Ysh

Early-1930s. Tramline near Hotel "Metropol" on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square):

Link

1930s. Tram trains near Hotel "Metropol" on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square):

foto-history

1932. Tramcars on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square):

Izus67

1930s. "F" tramcar №695 (constructed in 1912) and two-axle trailer №1201 (constructed in 1909 at Kolomna Plant) on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square) near Hotel "Metropol":

ARTём
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:11 PM   #3525
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1922-1928. Hunting Row, view from the side of Moss Street. St. Paraskeva Pyatnitsa Church (left):

oldmos

1930-1932. The demolition of buildings at Hunting Row:

oldmos

1930-1932. The demolition of buildings at Hunting Row:

oldmos

1931, freight tramcar №1240 (former "N" trailer, which was constructed in 1911 at Baltic Plant in Riga and was written-off in 1924). The construction of tramline at Manege Street:

oldmos
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:12 PM   #3526
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1928-1932. The intersection of Herzen Street (now Greater St. Nicetas Street) and Manege Street:

oldmos

1933. The demolition of buildings between Manege Street and Moss Street:

oldmos

1932. Tramline at Moss Street:

oldmos

1933. KP trailer №2588 (constructed in 1932 at Kolomna Plant) on the Hunting Row Square before its reconstruction:

Aviateur

1931-1935, KM/KP/KP tram train at Moss Street. Hostel "Red Fleet", that's former Hotel "Loskutnaya" (left):

oldmos
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:12 PM   #3527
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1933. BF tramcar №887 (constructed in 1926 at Kolomna Plant) and "S" trailer №1624 (constructed in 1931 at SVARZ Plant in Moscow) on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square), tram route №6:

Aviateur

1933-1934, tram train at Theatre Driveway. Monument to first Russian printer Ivan Fedorov (ca. 1520 - 1583):

oldmos

1934. "Exemplary" tramcar on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square), tram route №6:

oldmos

1934. Hotel "National" at Moss Street was built in 1901-1903 by architect Alexander Ivanov (1845-1917):

oldmos

1934. Tram train near Hotel "National" at Moss Street:

oldmos

1933-1934, tramcar at Moss Street. The construction of Hotel "Moscow" on the background:

Link

1934. The reconstruction of the Manege Square. The freight tramcar №3187 (former "F" tramcar) on temporary tramline which was built for period of Metro construction:

oldmos
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:13 PM   #3528
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1934-1935. The construction of Hotel "Moscow" on the background:

mr. Myxin

1934. Hunting Row Street:

oldmos

1935, Hunting Row Street after reconstruction. The building of Council of Labour and Defence (now State Duma headquarters) at left side was constructed in 1932-1935 by architect Arkady Langman. The Hotel "Moscow" at right side was constructed in 1932-1938 by architects Alexey Shchusev, Leonid Savelyev and Oswald Stapran:

oldmos

1935. Hunting Row Street after reconstruction:

oldmos

1935, tramcar on the Manege Square. The construction of Hotel "Moscow" on the background:

mr. Myxin

1935, Hunting Row Street. The entrance to Metro station "Okhotny Ryad" ("Hunting Row") in the building of Hotel "Moscow" (right):

oldmos

1935. The construction of Hotel "Moscow" on the background:

oldmos
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:14 PM   #3529
geometarkv
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1934-1938, Hunting Row Street. View from the Hotel "Moscow":

oldmos

1935. Tram train near Hotel "National" at Moss Street:

oldmos

1935. Tramcar on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square) near the vestibule of Metro station "Okhotny Ryad" ("Hunting Row"):

oldmos

1935. Tramcar on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square) near the vestibule of Metro station "Okhotny Ryad" ("Hunting Row"):

oldmos

1936. Tram train at Theatre Driveway:

Андрей В.

1936. Tram train on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square):

Андрей В.

1935-1936, view of Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square) from the gallery of hotel "Moscow". The frame from the Soviet comedy film "Circus" (1936, director - Grigory Aleksandrov):

oldmos

1935-1936. Tram trains on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square):

oldmos

May 1936. KM tramcar №2006 (constructed in 1929 at Kolomna Plant) and "M" trailer №1827 (constructed in 1931 at Mytishchi Plant) on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square) near Grand Theatre:

AlexSan
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:17 PM   #3530
geometarkv
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1937, tramline near Grand Theatre on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square). The celebrations dedicated to the 20th anniversary of Great October Socialist Revolution:

Ysh

1937. KM/S/S tram train on the Manege Square:

Aviateur

1937. Hotel "National" at Moss Street:

Sontucio

1937, Hunting Row Street. Council of Labour and Defence headquarters (now State Duma headquarters) at left side and Hotel "Moscow" at right side:

oldmos
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:17 PM   #3531
geometarkv
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1937-1938, Manege Square. Hotel "Moscow" on the background:

oldmos

1938, Manege Square. Hotel "Moscow" on the background:

oldmos

1940. KP trailer №2572 (constructed in 1932 at Kolomna Plant) near Hotel "National" on the Manege Square:

AlexSan

1938-1940. Tram trains at Hunting Row Street near Hotel "Moscow":

oldmos
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:18 PM   #3532
geometarkv
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1935-1940. Tram train at Theatre Driveway:

oldmos

1936-1941. BF tramcar №927 (constructed in 1927 at Kolomna Plant) and "S" trailer №4065 (constructed in 1932 at SVARZ Plant in Moscow) at Hunting Row Street:

Книга Мосгортранс - 50 лет

1935-1939. Tram train at Theatre Driveway:

oldmos

1939, Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square). The common vestibule of Metro stations "Okhotny Ryad" ("Hunting Row") and "Ploshchad Sverdlova" ("Sverdlov Square"), now "Teatralnaya" ("Theatre"):

oldmos
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:18 PM   #3533
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1938. "F" tramcar №440 (constructed in 1909 at Baltic Plant in Riga), KP trailer №2550 (constructed in 1931 at Kolomna Plant) and YaTB-2 trolleybus №400 (constructed in 1937 at Yaroslavl Automotive Plant) at Hunting Row Street:

Aviateur

1930s, "F" tramcar №585 (constructed in 1911 at Baltic Plant in Riga) at Hunting Row Street. Hotel "Moscow" (right):

AlexSan

1938-1939. KM tramcars on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square) - №2115 (constructed in 1929 at Kolomna Plant) and №2224 (constructed in 1933 at Kolomna Plant), tram route №40:

Aviateur
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:19 PM   #3534
geometarkv
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1890s. Horse-driven tram on the Cross Outpost Square (now Riga Square), water towers on the background (built in 1890-1893 by Max Hoeppener):

Link

1913-1914. Cross Outpost Square (now Riga Square), water towes on the background:

oldmos

1920s. Cross Outpost Square (now Riga Square), water towers on the background:

Киреев Андрей

1930s. Cross Outpost Square (now Riga Square), water towers on the background:

Link

1937-1939. Cross Outpost Square (now Riga Square), water towers on the background:

Link

1940. Cross Outpost Square (now Riga Square), demolition of water towers on the background:

oldmos

1940. Cross Bridge, demolition of water towers on the background. As result of the opening of All-Union Agricultural Exhibition (1939) and following reconstruction of Yaroslavl Highway, both towers were demolished in 1940 to make way for street traffic:

Aviateur

1940, Cross Bridge. YaTB-3 double-decker trolleybus and few M-38 tramcars:

oldmos
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:19 PM   #3535
geometarkv
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1936. M-36 "blue tramcar" №1003 (constructed in April 1936) near native SVARZ Plant in Moscow:

Aviateur

Late-1930s. M-36 "blue tramcar" №1001 (constructed in November 1935 at SVARZ Plant in Moscow) near Grand Theatre on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square), tram route №40:

Ааре Оландер

1939. M-36 "blue tramcar" №1001 (constructed in November 1935 at SVARZ Plant in Moscow) near Hotel "Metropol" on the Sverdlov Square (now Theatre Square), tram route №34:

oldmos

Late-1930s. M-38 "blue tramcar" in Moscow:

Книга Мосгортранс - 50 лет

Late-1930s. M-38 "blue tramcar" №1006 (constructed in 1938 at Mytishchi Plant) near the taxi stop in Moscow:

AlexSan

M-38 "blue tramcar" №1043 (constructed in 1939 at Mytishchi Plant), tram route №5:

Книга Мосгортранс - 50 лет

1939. Terminus tram stop "VSKhV" near All-Union Agricultural Exhibition, now All-Russia Exhibition Centre (VVTs):

oldmos

1940, YaTB-3 double-decker trolleybus near All-Union Agricultural Exhibition (VSKhV), now All-Russia Exhibition Centre (VVTs). The great monument "Worker and Kolkhoz Woman" (made from stainless steel by sculptor Vera Mukhina for the 1937 World's Fair in Paris) on the background:

oldmos

1941. M-38 "blue tramcar" №1063 (constructed in 1941 at Mytishchi Plant) near All-Union Agricultural Exhibition (VSKhV), now All-Russia Exhibition Centre (VVTs):

oldmos
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:20 PM   #3536
geometarkv
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1930s. Tramcars on the old Moscow-River Bridge:

Alexander Ivanov

1932. Tram train on the old Moscow-River Bridge:

Izus67

1932, tram train on the old Moscow-River Bridge. "New Moscow" Hotel (now "Balchug Kempinski" Hotel) on the background:

Андрей В.

1935. "S" trailer №4320 (constructed in 1933 at SVARZ Plant in Moscow) on the old Moscow-River Bridge:

Alexander Ivanov
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:21 PM   #3537
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The episode from never-released Soviet film "New Moscow" about Stalin's reconstruction of Moscow (1938, director - Alexander Medvedkin). Conceived as an ode to the New Moscow, this film factually became requiem for Old Moscow:


1936. Preparations for construction of the new bridge across Moscow-River:

Alexander Ivanov

1938. End of the construction of Greater Moscow-River Bridge. Built in 1936-1938, it was designed by V. Kirillov (structural engineering), Alexey Shchusev and Patvakan Sardaryan (architectural design):

Alexander Ivanov

1940. Greater Moscow-River Bridge:

Aviateur

1940. Greater Moscow-River Bridge:

Alexander Ivanov
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:21 PM   #3538
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MOSCOW TRAM IN THE POPULAR CULTURE

In 1929-1940 great Russian writer Mikhail Bulgakov (1891-1940) wrote novel "The Master and Margarita" - the one of the best Russian masterpieces of 20th century. This novel was finally published by Bulgakov's widow in 1966, twenty-six years after his death. It led to an international appreciation of Bulgakov's work. After publication, "The Master and Margarita" achieved the status of a cult novel in the Russia. The episode with Moscow tramcar became well-famous in Russia and other post-Soviet states. May be, this fictional episode became so known as the circumstances which led to the death of great Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí (1852-1926), who was knocked down by a Barcelona tram on June 7, 1926 and subsequently died.

The novel begins with Satan visiting fervently atheistic Moscow in the 1930s, joining a conversation between an editor Mikhail Alexandrovich Berlioz and a poet Ivan Nikolaevich Homeless debating the existence of Jesus Christ and the Devil. It develops into an all-embracing indictment of the corruption, greed, narrow-mindedness, and widespread paranoia of Soviet Russia. Published more than 25 years after Bulgakov's death, and more than ten years after Stalin's, the novel firmly secured Bulgakov's place among the pantheon of great Russian writers.

Some episodes from the novel:

CHAPTER 1. Never Talk with Strangers

«.... "Kant's proof," the learned editor objected with a subtle smile, "is equally unconvincing. Not for nothing did Schiller say that the Kantian reasoning on this question can satisfy only slaves and Strauss simply laughed at this proof." Berlioz spoke, thinking all the while: "But, anyhow, who is he? And why does he speak Russian so well?"

"They ought to take this Kant and give him a three-year stretch in Solovki labour camp for such proofs!" Ivan Nikolaevich plumped quite unexpectedly.

"Ivan!" Berlioz whispered, embarrassed.

But the suggestion of sending Kant to Solovki labour camp not only did not shock the foreigner, but even sent him into raptures.

"Precisely, precisely," he cried, and his green left eye, turned to Berlioz, flashed. "Just the place for him! Didn't I tell him that time at breakfast? 'As you will, Professor, but what you've thought up doesn't hang
together. It's clever, maybe, but mighty unclear. You'll be laughed at.'"

Berlioz goggled his eyes. "At breakfast... to Kant? ... What is this drivel?" he thought.

"But," the outlander went on, unembarrassed by Berlioz's amazement and addressing the poet, "sending him to Solovki is unfeasible, for the simple reason that he has been abiding for over a hundred years now in places considerably more remote than Solovki, and to extract him from there is in no way possible, I assure you."

"Too bad!" the feisty poet responded.

"Yes, too bad!" the stranger agreed, his eye flashing, and went on: "But here is a question that is troubling me: if there is no God, then, one may ask, who governs human life and, in general, the whole order of things on earth?"

"Man governs it himself," Homeless angrily hastened to reply to this admittedly none-too-clear question. "Pardon me," the stranger responded gently, "but in order to govern, one needs, after all, to have a precise plan for certain, at least somewhat decent, length of time. Allow me to ask you, then, how man can govern, if he is not only deprived of the opportunity of making a plan for at least some ridiculously short period - well, say, a thousand years - but cannot even vouch for his own tomorrow?

"And in fact," here the stranger turned to Berlioz, "imagine that you, for instance, start governing, giving orders to others and yourself, generally, so to speak, acquire a taste for it, and suddenly you get ...hem... hem ... lung cancer..." - here the foreigner smiled sweetly, and if the thought of lung cancer gave him pleasure - "yes, cancer" - narrowing his eyes like a cat, he repeated the sonorous word - "and so your governing is over!

"You are no longer interested in anyone's fate but your own. Your family starts lying to you. Feeling that something is wrong, you rush to learned doctors, then to quacks, and sometimes to fortune-tellers as well. Like the first, so the second and third are completely senseless, as you understand. And it all ends tragically: a man who still recently thought he was governing something, suddenly winds up lying motionless in a wooden box, and the people around him, seeing that the man lying there is no longer good for anything, burn him in an oven.

"And sometimes it's worse still: the man has just decided to go to Kislovodsk" - here the foreigner squinted at Berlioz - "a trifling matter, it seems, but even this he cannot accomplish, because suddenly, no one knows why, he slips and falls under a tramcar! Are you going to say it was he who governed himself that way? Would it not be more correct to think that he was governed by someone else entirely?" And here the unknown man burst into a strange little laugh.

Berlioz listened with great attention to the unpleasant story about the cancer and the tramcar, and certain alarming thoughts began to torment him.

"He's not a foreigner... He's not a foreigner..." he thought, "he's a most peculiar specimen ... but, excuse me, who is he then? ..."

"You'd like to smoke, I see?" the stranger addressed Homeless unexpectedly. "Which kind do you prefer?"

"What, have you got several?" the poet, who had run out of cigarettes, asked glumly.

"Which do you prefer?" the stranger repeated.

"Okay - 'Our Brand'," Homeless replied spitefully.

The unknown man immediately took a cigarette case from his pocket and offered it to Homeless: 'Our Brand...'

Editor and poet were both struck, not so much by 'Our Brand' precisely turning up in the cigarette case, as by the cigarette case itself. It was of huge size, made of pure gold, and, as it was opened, a diamond triangle flashed white and blue fire on its lid. Here the writers thought differently. Berlioz: "No, a foreigner!", and Homeless: "Well, devil take him, eh! ..."

The poet and the owner of the cigarette case lit up, but the non-smoker Berlioz declined. "I must counter him like this," Berlioz decided, "yes, man is mortal, no one disputes that. But the thing is..."

However, before he managed to utter these words, the foreigner spoke: "Yes, man is mortal, but that would be only half the trouble. The worst of it is that he's sometimes unexpectedly mortal - there's the trick! And generally he's unable to say what he's going to do this same evening."

"What an absurd way of putting the question ..." Berlioz thought and objected: "Well, there's some exaggeration here. About this same evening I do know more or less certainly. It goes without saying, if a brick should fall on my head on Armor Street."

"No brick," the stranger interrupted imposingly, "will ever fall on anyone's head just out of the blue. In this particular case, I assure you, you are not in danger of that at all. You will die a different death."

"Maybe you know what kind precisely?" Berlioz inquired with perfectly natural irony, getting drawn into an utterly absurd conversation. "And will tell me?"

"Willingly," the unknown man responded. He looked Berlioz up and down as if he were going to make him a suit, muttered through his teeth something like: "One, two ... Mercury in the second house ... moon gone ... six - disaster... evening - seven..." then announced loudly and joyfully: "Your head will be cut off!"

Homeless goggled his eyes wildly and spitefully at the insouciant stranger, and Berlioz asked, grinning crookedly: "By whom precisely? Enemies? Interventionists?"

"No," replied his interlocutor, "by a Russian woman, a member of Komsomol."

"Hm.." Berlioz mumbled, vexed at the stranger's little joke, "well, excuse me, but that's not very likely."

"And I beg you to excuse me," the foreigner replied, "but it's so. Ah, yes, I wanted to ask you, what are you going to do tonight, if it's not a secret?"

"It's not a secret. Right now I'll stop by my place on Garden Street, and then at ten this evening there will be a meeting at Massolit trade union, and I will chair it."

"No, that simply cannot be," the foreigner objected firmly.

"Why not?"

"Because," the foreigner replied and, narrowing his eyes, looked into the sky, where, anticipating the cool of the evening, black birds were tracing noiselessly, "Annushka has already bought the sunflower oil, and has not only bought it, but has already spilled it. So the meeting will not take place."

Here, quite understandably, silence fell under the lindens.

"Forgive me," Berlioz spoke after a pause, glancing at the drivel-spouting foreigner, "but what has sunflower oil got to do with it ... and which Annushka?"

"Sunflower oil has got this to do with it," Homeless suddenly spoke, obviously deciding to declare war on the uninvited interlocutor. "Have you ever happened, citizen, to be in a hospital for the mentally ill?"

"Ivan! ..." Mikhail Alexandrovich exclaimed quietly. But the foreigner was not a bit offended and burst into the merriest laughter.

"I have, I have, and more than once!" he cried out, laughing, but without taking his unlaughing eye off the poet. "Where haven't I been! Only it's too bad I didn't get around to asking the professor what schizophrenia is. So you will have to find that out from him yourself, Ivan Nikolaevich!....»


TIME 00:00 - 05:55. The above-written episode of Chapter 1 in the Russian mini-series "The Master and Margarita" (2005, director - Vladimir Bortko):


CHAPTER 3. The Seventh Proof

«....Berlioz realized at once what had to be done. Leaning back on the bench, he winked to Homeless behind the professor's back - meaning, don't contradict him - but the perplexed poet did not understand these signals.

"Yes, yes, yes," Berlioz said excitedly, "incidentally it's all possible... even very possible, Pontius Pilate, and the balcony, and so forth... Did you come alone or with your wife?"

"Alone, alone, I'm always alone," the professor replied bitterly.

"And where are your things, Professor?" Berlioz asked insinuatingly. "At the 'Metropol'? Where are you staying?"

"I? ... Nowhere," the half-witted German answered, his green eye wandering in wild anguish over the Patriarch Ponds.

"How's that? But ... where are you going to live?"

"In your apartment," the madman suddenly said brashly, and winked.

"I ... I'm very glad ..." Berlioz began muttering, "but, really, you won't be comfortable at my place ... and they have wonderful rooms at the 'Metropol', it's a first-class hotel..."

"And there's no devil either?" the sick man suddenly inquired merrily of Ivan Nikolaevich.

"No devil..."

"Don't contradict him," Berlioz whispered with his lips only, dropping behind the professor's back and making faces.

"There isn't any devil!" Ivan Nikolaevich, at a loss from all this balderdash, cried out not what he ought. "What a punishment! Stop playing the psycho!"

Here the insane man burst into such laughter that a sparrow flew out of the linden over the seated men's heads.

"Well, now that is positively interesting!" the professor said, shaking with laughter. "What is it with you - no matter what one asks for, there isn't any!" He suddenly stopped laughing and, quite understandably for a mentally ill person, fell into the opposite extreme after laughing, became vexed and cried sternly: "So you mean there just simply isn't any?"

"Calm down, calm down, calm down, Professor," Berlioz muttered, for fear of agitating the sick man. "You sit here for a little minute with comrade Homeless, and I'll just run to the corner to make a phone call, and then we'll take you wherever you like. You don't know the city..."

Berlioz's plan must be acknowledged as correct: he had to run to the nearest public telephone and inform the foreigners' bureau, thus and so, there's some consultant from abroad sitting at the Patriarch Ponds in an obviously abnormal state. So it was necessary to take measures, lest some unpleasant nonsense result.

"To make a call? Well, then make your call," the sick man agreed sadly, and suddenly begged passionately: "But I implore you, before you go, at least believe that the devil exists! I no longer ask you for anything more. Mind you, there exists a seventh proof of it, the surest of all! And it is going to be presented to you right now!"

"Very good, very good," Berlioz said with false tenderness and, winking to the upset poet, who did not relish at all the idea of guarding the mad German, set out for the exit from the Ponds at the corner of Armor Street and Yermolay Lane.

And the professor seemed to recover his health and brighten up at once.

"Mikhail Alexandrovich!" he shouted after Berlioz.

The latter gave a start, looked back, but reassured himself with the thought that the professor had also learned his name and patronymic from some newspaper.

Then the professor called out, cupping his hands like a megaphone: "Would you like me to have a telegram sent at once to your uncle in Kyiv?"

And again Berlioz winced. How does the madman know about the existence of a Kyivan uncle? That has certainly never been mentioned in any newspapers. Oh-oh, maybe Homeless is right after all? And suppose his papers are phoney? Ah, what a strange specimen ... Call, call! Call at once! They'll quickly explain him!

And, no longer listening to anything, Berlioz ran on.

Here, just at the exit to Armor Street, there rose from a bench to meet the editor exactly the same citizen who in the sunlight earlier had formed himself out of the thick swelter. Only now he was no longer made of air, but ordinary, fleshly, and Berlioz clearly distinguished in the beginning twilight that he had a little moustache like chicken feathers, tiny eyes, ironic and half drunk, and checkered trousers pulled up so high that his dirty white socks showed.

Mikhail Alexandrovich drew back, but reassured himself by reflecting that it was a stupid coincidence and that generally there was no time to think about it now.

"Looking for the turnstile, citizen?" the checkered type inquired in a cracked tenor. "This way, please! Straight on and you'll get where you're going. How about a little pint pot for my information ... to set up an ex-choirmaster!..." Mugging, the specimen swept his jockey's cap from his head.

Berlioz, not stopping to listen to the cadging and clowning choirmaster, ran up to the turnstile and took hold of it with his hand. He turned it and was just about to step across the rails when red and white light splashed in his face. A sign lit up in a glass box: "Caution Tramcar!"

And right then this tramcar came racing along, turning down the newly laid line from Yermolay Lane to Armor Street. Having turned, and coming to the straight stretch, it suddenly lit up inside with electricity, whined, and put on speed.

The prudent Berlioz, though he was standing in a safe place, decided to retreat behind the stile, moved his hand on the crossbar, and stepped back.

And right then his hand slipped and slid, one foot, unimpeded, as if on ice, went down the cobbled slope leading to the rails, the other was thrust into the air, and Berlioz was thrown on to the rails.

Trying to get hold of something, Berlioz fell backwards, the back of his head lightly striking the cobbles, and had time to see high up - but whether to right or left he no longer knew - the gold-tinged moon. He managed to turn on his side, at the same moment drawing his legs to his stomach in a frenzied movement, and, while turning, to make out the face, completely white with horror, and the crimson armband of the woman driver bearing down on him with irresistible force. Berlioz did not cry out, but around him the whole street screamed with desperate female voices.

The woman driver tore at the electric brake, the car dug its nose into the ground, then instantly jumped up, and glass flew from the windows with a crash and a jingle. Here someone in Berlioz's brain cried desperately: "Can it be?..." Once more, and for the last time, the moon flashed, but now breaking to pieces, and then it became dark.

The tramcar went over Berlioz, and a round dark object was thrown up the cobbled slope below the fence of the Patriarch's alley. Having rolled back down this slope, it went bouncing along the cobblestones of the street.

It was the severed head of Berlioz»


TIME 02:27 - 07:13. The above-written episode of Chapter 3 in the Russian mini-series "The Master and Margarita" (2005). Despite the fact that the city of Moscow plays an important role in the novel, director Vladimir Bortko opted to shoot the 1930s scenes in St. Petersburg. "St. Petersburg today is much more like Moscow in the Stalin's period than Moscow today," he said. In particular, St. Petersburg MS-4 museum tramcar №2424 (constructed in 1930) was filmed in the episode of Berlioz's death:


CHAPTER 4. The Chase

«The hysterical women's cries died down, the police whistles stopped drilling, two ambulances drove off - one with the headless body and severed head, to the morgue, the other with the beautiful driver, wounded by broken glass; street sweepers in white aprons removed the broken glass and poured sand on the pools of blood, but Ivan Nikolaevich just stayed on the bench as he had dropped on to it before reaching the turnstile. He tried several times to get up, but his legs would not obey him - something akin to paralysis had occurred with Homeless.

The poet had rushed to the turnstile as soon as he heard the first scream, and had seen the head go bouncing along the pavement. With that he so lost his senses that, having dropped on to the bench, he bit his hand until it bled. Of course, he forgot about the mad German and tried to figure out one thing only: how it could be that he had just been talking with Berlioz, and a moment later - the head...

Agitated people went running down the walk past the poet, exclaiming something, but Ivan Nikolaevich was insensible to their words. However, two women unexpectedly ran into each other near him, and one of them, sharp-nosed and bare-headed, shouted the following to the other, right next to the poet's ear:

"...Annushka, our Annushka! From Garden Street! It's her work... She bought sunflower oil at the grocery, and went and broke the whole litre-bottle on the turnstile! Messed her skirt all up, and swore and swore! ... And he, poor man, must have slipped and - right on to the rails..."

Of all that the woman shouted, one word lodged itself in Ivan Nikolaevich's upset brain: "Annushka"...

"Annushka... Annushka?" the poet muttered, looking around anxiously. "Wait a minute, wait a minute..."

The word "Annushka" got strung together with the words "sunflower oil", and then for some reason with "Pontius Pilate". The poet dismissed Pilate and began linking up the chain that started from the word "Annushka". And this chain got very quickly linked up and led at once to the mad professor.

"Excuse me! But he did say the meeting wouldn't take place because Annushka had spilled the oil. And, if you please, it won't take place! What's more, he said straight out that Berlioz's head would be cut off by a woman?! Yes, yes, yes! And the driver was a woman! What is all this, eh?!"

There was not a grain of doubt left that the mysterious consultant had known beforehand the exact picture of the terrible death of Berlioz. Here two thoughts pierced the poet's brain. The first: "He's not mad in the least, that's all nonsense!" And the second: "Then didn't he set it all up himself?"

"But in what manner, may we ask?! Ah, no, this we're going to find out!"

Making a great effort, Ivan Nikolaevich got up from the bench and rushed back to where he had been talking with the professor. And, fortunately, it turned out that the man had not left yet....»

«....Ivan sped after the villains and became convinced at once that it - would be very difficult to catch up with them.

The trio shot down the lane in an instant and came out on St. Spyridon Street. No matter how Ivan quickened his pace, the distance between him and his quarry never diminished. And before the poet knew it, he emerged, after the quiet of St. Spyridon Street, by the St. Nicetas Gate, where his situation worsened.

The place was swarming with people. Besides, the gang of villains decided to apply the favourite trick of bandits here: a scattered getaway.

The choirmaster, with great dexterity, bored his way on to a bus speeding towards the Arbat Square and slipped away. Having lost one of his quarries, Ivan focused his attention on the cat and saw this strange cat go up to the footboard of an "A" tram waiting at a stop, brazenly elbow aside a woman, who screamed, grab hold of the handrail, and even make an attempt to shove a 10-kopecks coin into the conductress's hand through the window, opened on account of the stuffiness.

Ivan was so struck by the cat's behavior that he froze motionless by the grocery store on the corner, and here he was struck for a second time, but much more strongly, by the woman-conductor's behavior. As soon as the woman-conductor has seen the cat trying to get on the tramcar, she started to shout, being in a frenzy of rage: "Cats are not allowed! Passengers with cats are not allowed!! Shoo! Get out, or I’ll call the police!!!"

Neither the woman-conductor nor the passengers were surprised by the heart of the matter: not just the cat trying to get on the tramcar, but the fact that he was going to pay!

The cat turned out to be not only a solvent but also a disciplined animal. At the very first shout from the woman-conductor, he halted his advance, got off the footboard, and sat down at the stop, rubbing his whiskers with the 10-kopecks coin. But as soon as the conductress yanked the cord and the tramcar started moving off, the cat acted like anyone who has been expelled from a tramcar but still needs a ride. Letting all three cars go by, the cat jumped on to the rear coupling-pin of the last one, wrapped its paws around some hose sticking out of the side, and rode off, thus saving himself 10 kopecks.

Occupied with the obnoxious cat, Ivan almost lost the main one of the three - the professor. But, fortunately, the man had not managed to slip away. Ivan saw the grey beret in the throng at the head of Greater St. Nicetas Street, now Herzen Street. In the twinkling of an eye, Ivan arrived there himself. However, he had no luck. The poet would quicken his pace, break into a trot, shove passers-by, yet not get an inch closer to the professor....»


TIME 01:10 - 05:40. The above-written episodes of Chapter 4 in the Russian mini-series "The Master and Margarita" (2005). St. Petersburg MS-4 museum tramcar №2424 also was filmed in the episode with cat:


Before Vladimir Bortko, this novel has been filmed few times abroad. Such world-prominent film directors as Andrzej Wajda and Aleksandar Petrović made movies based on the Bulgakov's novel. However, like practically any foreign movies based on Russian novels, it have little common with original plot.

For example, here are episodes from Italian-Yugoslav screen adaptation "The Master and Margarita" (1972) by Yugoslav film director Aleksandar Petrović. Winter snow in Belgrade makes this adaptation more distant from the original plot



Apart from movie and TV adaptations, many theatre performances were staged based on this novel. For the first time "The Master and Margarita" was finally brought to the Russian stage at the Taganka Theatre in 1977, in an adaptation by great theatre director Yuri Lyubimov (born 1917):



TIME 26:04 - 30:12. The first Russian screen adaptation of this novel was made by Yuri Kara in 1994, 11 years before Vladimir Bortko's miniseries. However, this movie was released in cinemas only in 2011 due to problems with rights on Bulgakov's literary inheritance. Unlike Vladimir Bortko, Yuri Kara was shooting the 1930s scenes in Moscow. In particular, prominent Moscow KM museum tramcar №2170 (constructed in 1930) was filmed in episodes. I'll write more details on this tramcar in the next series of posts


Moscow, Patriarch Ponds. The frame from the Russian drama film "The Master and Margarita" (1994, director - Yuri Kara):

Link

"Annushka" and "The Master and Margarita":

According to Bulgakov's novel, Mikhail Berlioz fell under a tramcar near Patriarch Ponds and, as it was predicted, got his head severed by a young Russian woman (the tramcar driver). This, however, could not happen in reality because the tramcars have never operated around Patriarch Ponds. Although some fans of the novel still continue to believe that such tramline existed at this site for a short time, there is no any real evidence of this. Such tramline is not mentioned in any historical map of that times. Perhaps Bulgakov wrote about this "newly laid line from Yermolay Lane to Armor Street" being sure that this tramline will be really built in the near future.

In the novel, Berlioz fell under a tramcar near Patriarch Ponds because he slipped on sunflower oil, which was earlier spilled by woman named Annushka (Annie) from Garden Street. Coincidentally, there is famous tram route "A" in Moscow, which is known among Muscovites as "Annushka" ("Annie"). Historically it operated along the Boulevard Ring and, in particular, along Clean Ponds Boulevard at which located other famous pond of Moscow. Due to number of associations - "Annushka", "pond", "tramcar" - Moscow tram route "A" became to strongly associate with Bulgakov's novel and with episode of Mikhail Berlioz's death. Many people even believe that this tram route was affectionately nicknamed "Annushka" in honor of the character of the novel. But in reality this affectionate nickname became common among Muscovites in 1910s, i.e. about 50 years before publication of Bulgakov's novel.

On May 15, 2004 in Moscow was opened cultural and educational center "Bulgakov House". It located in the house №10 at Greater Garden Street, where Mikhail Bulgakov and his wife lived during 1921–1924. This house was fictionalized as house №302-bis at Greater Garden Street in novel "The Master and Margarita". The communal flat №50, in which Bulgakov lived, became the prototype of that "A Naughty Apartment", where lived character of his novel Mikhail Berlioz prior to own death and where Devil with his retinue settled up for three days. On October 21, 2009 cultural and educational center "Bulgakov House" launched stylized bus (so-called "tram 302-bis on rubber tires") which provides excursions to places of Bulgakov's Moscow.

"Museum tram 302-bis on rubber tires":

Link

November 8, 2011. "Museum tram" at Greater Garden Street:

Сервис-Макс в яндексе

The interior of cafe "The Master and Margarita" near Patriarch Ponds is stylized on a novel:

Link
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:23 PM   #3539
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Since March 28, 1989 in Moscow operates restaurant tram "Annushka" ("Annie"). During some years, it was decorated with illustrations to "The Master and Margarita" novel:

Link

June 2, 2004. Restaurant tram "Annushka" ("Annie") near Metro station "Chistye Prudy" ("Clean Ponds"):

Link


metroblog


La Maniac

November 16, 2007. Restaurant tram "Annushka" ("Annie") at Clean Ponds Boulevard:

La Maniac

In the end of 2007 its exterior was changed:

Сергей Орлов

March 28, 2009. Tram trip dedicated to the 20th anniversary of the restaurant tram in Moscow:

Сергей Орлов


an-tonik


Link

Few illustrations to the novel:

Link


Link


Link
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Old May 2nd, 2014, 04:08 PM   #3540
geometarkv
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MOSCOW TRAMCARS OF THE INTERWAR PERIOD (1920-1940)

There are preserved some exemplars as well as replica of rarity tramcars in Moscow. In the previous chapters I'm already wrote about replica of horsecar №35 (constructed in 1999 to the centenary of Moscow electric tram) and about two-axle "F" tramcar №164 (constructed in 1908 at Mytishchi Plant near Moscow).

So now I offer to see a gallery of rarity tramcars that operated in Moscow in 1920s and 1930s.


"F" TRAMCAR №164 OF MYTISHCHI PLANT

The standard two-axle motor tramcar of Mytishchi Plant near Moscow. It was constructed in 1908. In 1914 tramcars of this series got name "Series VII". In 1930s these tramcars were classified as "F"-series ("Fonarny"). There was a small superstructure with low window glass on both sides – a so-called "lantern", hence the name of this series - "F" ("Lantern" mean "Fonarny" in Russian). In 1980s tramcar №164 was restored as museum tramcar.



1999, museum site at Bauman tram depot. So-called "lantern" on the roof of "F" tramcar:

Евгений Куйбышев

July 28, 2000. Tram train №164-1113 at the museum site of Bauman tram depot:

Vladislav Prudnikov

September 6, 2003. "F" tramcar №164 near Clean Ponds Boulevard:

andzis
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