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Old August 6th, 2011, 12:10 AM   #1201
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August 1, 2011


Пельмень


Пельмень


Пельмень


Пельмень


Пельмень


Пельмень


Пельмень
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Old August 6th, 2011, 08:32 AM   #1202
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VLADIVOSTOK AEROEXPRESS (2012)

Project of the Aeroexpress station near Rail Terminal. View from the Aleut street:

Black_Diamond

View from the platform:

Black_Diamond
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Old August 6th, 2011, 08:33 AM   #1203
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July 30-August 2. Construction of the Aeroexpress station

Right building is "Russian Railways" (RZD) office:


Dimas89

Marine Terminal and future Golden Horn Bay bridge on the background:

Black_Diamond

Vladivostok Rail Terminal on the background:

Black_Diamond


Black_Diamond


Black_Diamond

View from the rail platform:

Black_Diamond
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Old August 6th, 2011, 08:46 AM   #1204
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Cool, so every mayor city goes to have Aeroexpress to airport?
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Old August 6th, 2011, 10:17 AM   #1205
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KAZAN AEROEXPRESS (2013)

Future Aeroexpress line:

RENALD


RENALD


RENALD

Former filling station near Kazan International Airport:

RENALD


RENALD
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Old August 6th, 2011, 10:19 AM   #1206
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RENALD


RENALD


RENALD


RENALD

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aokromes View Post
Cool, so every mayor city goes to have Aeroexpress to airport?
No, only for the big summits or major sport events.

Read my posts here:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...431156&page=49
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Old August 8th, 2011, 07:46 PM   #1207
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SOCHI AEROEXPRESS (2011-2012)

August 6, 2011. Construction of the Esto-Sadok rail station:

bednenkiy


bednenkiy


bednenkiy


bednenkiy


bednenkiy
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Old August 8th, 2011, 07:48 PM   #1208
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bednenkiy


bednenkiy


bednenkiy
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Old August 10th, 2011, 05:29 PM   #1209
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RUSSIA | Trams

This is thread about tram in Russian Federation.

For the first time, I plan to load big historical material about appearance and development of the tram in Russia from first days to present. After that, I plan to write about current news and events.

I want to apologize in advance - first, for my bad English, and secondly, for the bad quality of some photos. Now it's impossible to believe this, but in the late 19th century people in Russia were so poor that they had no money to buy a digital photocamera for themselves!
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Old August 10th, 2011, 05:30 PM   #1210
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HISTORY OF TRAM IN RUSSIA

(DEVOTED TO THE BRIGHT MEMORY OF RUSSIAN TRAM)

PART ONE - HORSECARS

Tram, streetcar or trolley systems were common throughout the industrialized world in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, but they disappeared from many cities in the mid-20th century. In recent years, they have made a comeback. Many newer light rail systems share features with trams, although a distinction is usually drawn between the two, especially if the line has significant off-street running.

I) INVENTION OF HORSE-DRAWN TRAM:

The very first tram was on the Swansea and Mumbles Railway in south Wales, UK; it was horse-drawn at first, and later moved by steam and electric power. The Mumbles Railway Act was passed by the British Parliament in 1804, and the first passenger railway (similar to streetcars in the US some 30 years later) started operating in 1807.

In 1804 the British Parliament approved the laying of a railway line between Swansea and Oystermouth in South Wales, for transportation of mined materials to and from the Swansea Canal and the harbour at the mouth of the River Tawe. In the autumn of that year the first tracks were laid. At this stage, the railway was known as the Oystermouth Railway. It later became the Swansea and Mumbles Railway, but in common parlance its name was the Mumbles Train.

There was no road link between Swansea and Oystermouth and the original purpose of the railway was to transport coal, iron-ore and limestone. Construction seems to have been completed in 1806 and operations began without formal ceremony, using horse-drawn vehicles. As constructed, the line ran from the Brewery Bank adjacent to the Swansea Canal in Swansea, around the wide sweep of Swansea Bay to a terminus at Castle Hill (near the present-day Clements Quarry) in the tiny isolated fishing village of Oystermouth (colloquially known as "Mumbles" although, strictly speaking, that name applies only to the headland at the south-western tip of Swansea bay with its distinctive twin islets, on one of which is mounted the Mumbles lighthouse).

In 1807 approval was given to carry passengers along the line, when one of the original proprietors, Benjamin French, offered to pay the company the sum of twenty pounds for the right to do so for twelve months from March 25, 1807. This is usually cited as the date when the first regular service carrying passengers between Swansea and Oystermouth began, thus giving the railway the claim of being the first passenger railway in the world. The venture was evidently a success because the following year French joined with two others in offering the increased sum of twenty five pounds to continue the arrangement for a further year, but the construction of a turnpike road parallel to the railway in the mid 1820s robbed it of much of its traffic and the passenger service (by that time in the hands of one Simon Llewelyn) ceased in 1826 or 1827, ironically just as events elsewhere in the United Kingdom (particularly in the north east of England) were paving the way for the development of railways as a truly national and international transport system.

Swansea and Mumbles Railway (1804-1806; opened on March 25, 1807) - first passenger railway in the world:

Link

Horsecars were early forms of public transport developed out of industrial haulage routes or from the omnibus that first ran on public streets in the 1820s, using the newly invented iron or steel rail or "tramway". These were local versions of the stagecoach lines and picked up and dropped off passengers on a regular route, without the need to be pre-hired. Horsecars on tramlines were an improvement over the omnibus as the low rolling resistance of metal wheels on iron or steel rails (usually grooved from 1852 on), allowed the animals to haul a greater load for a given effort than the omnibus and gave a smoother ride. The horse-drawn streetcar combined the low cost, flexibility, and safety of animal power with the efficiency, smoothness, and all-weather capability of a rail right-of-way.

The first streetcars, also known as horsecars in North America, were built in the United States and developed from city stagecoach lines and omnibus lines that picked up and dropped off passengers on a regular route without the need to be pre-hired. These trams were an animal railway, usually using horses and sometimes mules to haul the cars, usually two as a team. Occasionally other animals were put to use, or humans in emergencies. The first streetcar line, developed by Irish-American John Stephenson, was the New York and Harlem Railroad's Fourth Avenue Line which ran along the Bowery and Fourth Avenue in New York City. Service began in 1832.

John G. Stephenson (1809-1893) was American coachbuilder, invented and patented the first streetcar to run on rails in the United States. He emigrated to the United States from Ireland with his parents, James and Grace Stephenson, when he was two years old. After attending public schools in New York City, he completed his education at the Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. At the age of 19, he became an apprentice to Abram Brower, the pioneer of the Broadway stage lines.

In May 1831, Stephenson started his own business, the John Stephenson Company, on 667 Broadway where he built omnibus cars for Brower until a fire destroyed his shop in March 1832. He immediately moved to a new site on Elizabeth Street near Bleecker where he continued to build omnibuses which proved to be a huge success on the streets of New York.

However, soon afterwards he received an order from John Mason, a wealthy banker and president of Chemical Bank who was among the largest landowners in New York City, to build a horse car for the New York and Harlem Railroad which had just been granted a charter authorizing a route from Fourth Avenue and the Bowery north to the Harlem River. This company was incorporated on April 25, 1831 as the New York and Harlem Railroad, to link New York City with suburban Harlem. The first stretch was opened from Prince to 14th Street on November 26, 1832, with a procession of the four cars developed for the company. Stephenson's car, named "John Mason" or simply the "Mason" after the company's president, was in the lead with the mayor and other dignitaries. He had modeled it after the English four-wheeled passenger railroad car but dropped the body down over the wheels for easier access. Four horses pulled the car and it carried up to 30 passengers in its three compartments. It was Stephenson's design which was finally adopted. In April 1833, he obtained a U.S. patent for it. Stephenson is therefore remembered as the creator of the tramway.

New York and Harlem Railroad (opened on November 26, 1832) - the world's first streetcar line:

Link


It was followed in 1835 by New Orleans, Louisiana, which has the oldest continuously operating street railway system in the world, according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Though short-lived, Poydras-Magazine was the first true streetcar line to begin operation in New Orleans, having opened the first week of January 1835. This line was closed in the spring 1836. Planning for St. Charles Avenue Line began in 1831, and work began as the New Orleans and Carrollton Railroad in February 1833, the second railway in Greater New Orleans after the Pontchartrain Rail Road. Service began on September 26, 1835, originally without a dedicated right-of-way (it ran on public streets) although one was eventually established in the neutral ground (the median). This line still operate till now.

The typical American streetcar was operated by two crew members. One man, a driver, rode up front. His job was to drive the horse, controlled by a set of reigns. The driver also had a brake handle that he could use to stop the streetcar. When streetcars got bigger, sometimes two and three horses would be used to haul a single car. The second crew member was called the conductor, who rode at the back of the car. His job was to help passengers get on and off the streetcar, collect their fares, and give a signal to the driver when everyone was on board and it was safe to proceed. He gave this signal by pulling on a rope that was attached to a bell at the other end of the car that the driver could hear.

St. Charles Avenue Line in New Orleans - the oldest among operating tramlines in the world (opened on September 26, 1835):

Gonola

The first horse-drawn rail cars on the continent of Europe were operated from 1828 by the Ceske Budejovice - Linz railway. At first the rails protruded above street level, causing accidents and major trouble for pedestrians. They were supplanted in 1852 by grooved rails or girder rails, invented by Alphonse Loubat. Alphonse Loubat (1799-1866) was a French inventor who developed improvements in tram and rail equipment, and helped develop tram lines in New York City and Paris. He was born in Sainte-Livrade-sur-Lot. Loubat went to New York City in 1827 where he helped develop that city's first tramway in 1832. He returned to France and developed the grooved rail in 1852, which greatly facilitated street railways and tramlines. The further development of the tram system in the world would have been impossible without grooved rails. In 1853 Alphonse Loubat initiated construction of Paris tramline. It was in Paris that Loubat built the first line of this type, for horse trams, which was inaugurated on November 21, 1853 in connection with the 1855 World Fair. On a trial basis, it ran along the banks of the Seine from the Place de la Concorde to the Pont de Sevres in the village of Boulogne. Although the results of first tests were unconvincing, the system was improved and in 1855 in Paris opened the regular tramline. It was one of the oldest tram systems in Europe.

Paris tramline - the first tram system with grooved rails:

Wikipedia
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Old August 10th, 2011, 05:31 PM   #1211
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II) HORSE-DRAWN TRAM IN RUSSIA:

Europe saw a proliferation of horsecar use for new tram services from the mid-1860s, many towns building new networks. Russian Empire was no exception.

LIST OF HORSE-DRAWN TRAM SYSTEMS IN RUSSIAN EMPIRE:

The first line of horse-drawn tram (which is known as "konka" in Russia) was opened in the capital of Russian Empire.

1) September 8, 1863 - Saint Petersburg (closed on September 8, 1917):

Saint Petersburg saw the arrival of street rail transport during the 1860s in form of horse-drawn rail carriages. The first, freight-only 3.5-km street railway track was opened in 1854 to serve one of the industrial city suburbs (near Smolenskaya Sloboda, engineer - A. Polezhaev). In 1860 engineer Domontovich built freight-only 3-km street railway in St. Petersburg - from steamship piers at Nicholas Enbankment (now Lieutenant Schmidt Enbankment) to Exchange Square (now Pushkin Square). A private Horse railway company (with the administration unit situated at house #3 at Trinity Street, presently Rubinstein Street) was founded on October 3, 1862, and until 1917 horse-car service remained a private business.

In 1863, three passenger lines (gauge - 1524 mm) in the city centre came into operation. The first testing of line was on August 3. On September 8, 1863 Horse railway company launched the first route from Nicholas Rail Terminal at Znamenskaya Square (now Uprising Square) along Nevsky Avenue to the Spit of Vasilyevsky Island. Shortly thereafter, two other lines were put into operation - from Admiralty Square to 6th Line of Vasilyevsky Island and from St. Nicholas Market along Garden street to Nevsky Avenue. The total lenght of three lines was 8 km.

Several private companies were formed, and the horsecar network eventually expanded to 26 routes covering over 90 kilometres of track. Initially horse-drawn trams didn't have big speed - maximum 8 km per hour. Horse-cars consisted of a wagon (streetcar) of about 8 meters in length with two harnessed horses, hauling it along rails. The car had an upper passenger deck (so-called "imperial"), where the fare was lower. Horse-cars were serviced by a coachman and a fare collector. Travel prices were 5 kopecks or 0.05 rubles (inside the wagon) and 3 kopecks or 0.03 rubles (at "imperial"). The capacity of carriage was 22 seats, not including 24 seats at upper deck. Interestingly, that the first models of trams did not have convenient staircase leading at "imperial". For this reason, women were forbidden to ride on the upper deck. First, walk up was some risky and secondly, it could lead to embarrassing situations because all women wear skirts in those times. Only on March 17, 1903, when configuration of staircases was changed, this ban was lifted.

The street rail network in Saint Petersburg proved a successful commercial venture. However, the first years were not successful. By the year 1864 the horse-trams carried 1.5 million passengers, in 1865 - 2 million. The total lenght of first lines was no big - near 8 versts (1 verst – 1.06 km). Initially there were 29 cars. Therefore, tram was no profitable. For this reason Horse railway company appealed to the City Council with a request to build new lines, but was refused due to protest of noble families. In 1875, the loss-making Horse railway company was sold to the London firm "E. Erlanger and Co." for the 23-years period.

However, the need of city in public transportation grew. In May 1874 City Council announce contest on the construction of a network of horse railroads with total lenght not less than 85 km. The winner of contest was bid of Сouncilor of State Sergey Bashmakov and Commerce Counsellor Pyotr Gubonin. In April 1876 Bashmakov and Gubonin established Joint-stock horse-railway society, with the Administration Headquarters located at #35 Liteiny Avenue, which supervised six horse-tram depots (Rozhdestvensky in the vicinity of the present 1st Soviet Street, Narvsky around Tractor Street, Vyborgsky at the corner of #23/19 Forest Avenue and others). By 1877 there were 26 horse-car routes with total lenght 90 km in St. Petersburg, serviced by 3500 horses; in 1906 there were 32 routes with the railway network exceeding 150 km.

However, it become clear that not all new routes are profitable. In order to save there were used one-floor cars without "imperials", which were driven by only one horse instead of two. However, horse-railway society was operated at a loss. Therefore, in 1879 they were forced to ask City Council for permission to raise fares in order to avoid bankruptcy. City Council gave permission to raise prices on one kopeck per passenger and to close unprofitable lines. However, they demanded in answer to build 10.6 km of new lines and to add second tracks at most busiest routes. Despite of the price increase, the horse-railway society operated at a loss till 1884, and only in 1885 become to make a profit.

In 1878 the Nevsky Suburban Horse-Railwaу Society was established with headquarters at 160 Nevsky Avenue, servicing the areas around Shlisselburg Road from Nicholas Rail Terminal to Murzinka Village, with a depot in Alexandrovskoe Village. By the year 1893 the horse-trams carried 57.781.582 passengers. In 1902, city authorities started buying out horse-railway property from joint-stock societies. With the first trams, run by municipal authorities, the private horse-car business carried on with its services. On September 8, 1917 by the decision of the City Council all horse-car lines were closed "due to starvation of horses and unavoidable difficulties for feed".

Nicholas Rail Terminal (now Moskovsky or Moscow Rail Terminal):

Link

Nevsky Avenue - main street in St. Petersburg:

panevin

January 29, 1874. Solemn transportation of the rescue boats to Nicholas Rail Terminal for its further transportation by rail:

babs71

November 14, 1877. Nicholas Rail Terminal. Transportation of wounded in actions during Russo-Turkish War of 1877-1878:

babs71

1905. Transportation of injured in actions during Russo-Japanese War of 1904-1905 to the Nicholas Military Hospital:

babs71

1896. "Imperial" of horse-drawn tram:

Link

1900s:

babs71

1900. "Imperial":

babs71

1906, Anichkov Bridge. It became possible to see women on "imperial":

babs71
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Old August 10th, 2011, 05:32 PM   #1212
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1896. Nevsky Avenue before Kazan Cathedral:

babs71

1890s. Crossing of Nevsky Avenue and St. Michael street. The building of Volga-Kama Commercial Bank:

babs71

1900s. Nicholas Rail Terminal (now Moskovsky Rail Terminal):

oldspb

1901. Nevsky Avenue:

oldspb

1900s. Nevsky Avenue:

babs71

1906. Nevsky Avenue:

babs71

1900s. Terminus station near Moscow Triumphal Gate:

babs71
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Old August 10th, 2011, 05:33 PM   #1213
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1900s. Terminus station near Hotel "Europe" at St. Michael street:

babs71

1900s. Palace Square:

Link

Alexander Garden:

babs71

1900s. Novo-Kalinkin Bridge:

oldsp

1900s. Garden street:

Wikipedia

1905. Saint Isaac's Cathedral:

babs71
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Old August 10th, 2011, 05:34 PM   #1214
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1896. Spit of Vasilyevsky Island:

Link

1903. Imperial Academy of Arts at Vasilyevsky Island:

babs71

1906. Stock Exchange at Vasilyevsky Island:

babs71

1905-1906, Pontoon Palace Bridge. At the most difficult parts of the routes one more (third) horse was fastened to the harness:

babs71

1906. Ligovskaya street (now Ligovsky Avenue):

oldsp
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Old August 10th, 2011, 05:35 PM   #1215
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Znamenskaya Square (now Uprising Square). Wooden building at right is a horsecar station:

Link

Admiralty Square:

Link


Link

Monument to the horsecar, crossing of Middle Avenue and 7th Line of Vasilyevsky Island. It was opened on October 27, 2004. This is a copy of tram car (sample of 1872-1878), which was made a life-size according to the drawings of Putilov Plant, which were found in Central Historical Archive. The plastic sculptures of horses (sculptor - Akhnaf Ziyakaev) were added on October 24, 2005 and replaced with marble sculptures in 2007:

[email protected]


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Old August 10th, 2011, 05:37 PM   #1216
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2) December 11, 1866 - Warsaw, Poland (closed in September 1914);
3) June 22, 1872 - Moscow (closed in 1912):

In 1872, since June 12 till September 13, in Moscow was held first All-Russian Technical Exhibition on the bicentennial anniversary of the birth of Russian Emperor Peter the Great (1672-1725). This exhibition was visited by 750.000 people. The exposition was been in Moscow Manege and in temporary pavilions at Alexander Garden, Kremlin enbankment and St. Barbara Square. As result, two large Moscow museums were founded in 1872 after exhibition. Fund of exhibition become the basis for the collection of Polytechnic Museum. Now it's a science museum in Moscow that emphasizes the progress of Russian and Soviet technology and science, as well as modern inventions and developments. In the historical halls of the All-Russian Technical Exhibition were displayed portraits of Peter I and his associates, productions and art of Peter's times. Those exhibits become basic for collection of State Historical Museum. Its exhibitions range from relics of the prehistoric tribes inhabiting present-day Russia, through priceless artworks acquired by members of the Romanov dynasty. The total number of objects in the museum's collection numbers in the millions. It was founded in 1872 by Ivan Zabelin, Aleksey Uvarov and several other Slavophiles interested in promotion of Russian history and national self-awareness. The board of trustees, composed of Sergey Solovyov, Vasily Klyuchevsky, Uvarov and other leading historians, presided over construction of the museum building. Its beautiful building at Red Square was built between 1875-1881 by Vladimir Sherwood and intricately decorated in the Russian Revival style by great Russian artists.

To service the exhibition was built horse-drawn tramline from the Brest Rail Terminal (now Belorussky or Belarusian Rail Terminal) to the present-day State Historical Museum via Tverskaya Street, the main and probably best-known radial street of Moscow. Its construction was financed by entrepreneurs D. Guryev and M. Novikov. This single-track line had lenght 4.5 km (gauge - 1524 mm), serviced by 10 trams. All necessary equipment, including two-floors carriages (with "imperial"), was supplied from Great Britain. The testing of this line was on June 21, 1872 (at the path from Tverskaya Outpost to the Triumphal Square). It was put into operation on July 7, 1872. At this day the horse-drawn trams carried more than 8.000 passangers. The capacity of each tram car was 40 seats. Travel prices were 10 kopecks or 0.10 rubles (inside the wagon) and 5 kopecks or 0.05 rubles (at "imperial"). At the most difficult parts of the routes one or two more horses were fastened to the harness. City authorities planned to disassemble this line after closing of All-Russian Technical Exhibition, but this kind of transport become popular (it was carried 10.000 passangers per day). As a result, Governor-General of Moscow Vladimir Dolgorukov allowed to continue its exploitation, but to use no more than 8 cars per day and to pay in city treasure 50 rubles per year from each car. City Council increased this tax on 100 rubles per month. This line worked before beginning of construction of main network of tramlines and was closed in April 1874 on reconstruction.

Before 1872 in Moscow was no any regular and reliable kind of public urban transport. The Moscow residents were forced to use the services of private entrepreneurs, who in 1847 organized work of "lineika" - open multi-seats horse-drawn carriages (4-5 seats, capacity - 10-15 passangers). The noble families used cabs or own carriages. In 1850 was founded Moscow Society of Multi-seat carriages.

The first project for construction of tramlines was offered in 1864. But only in 1872 City Council finally approved project of construction of tram network in Moscow. The concession for this project was given on 40-years period to the company of Count A. Uvarov. On September 25, 1873 Uvarov's company and city authorities signed contract, and construction of tramlines was started in Summer-Autumn 1874. On September 13, 1874 was opened renovated two-tracks 6.65-km Petrovskaya tramline (from Iberian Gate near Red Square to the Petrovsky Park through present-day Pushkin Square and Tverskaya Outpost). The new tram cars were supplied from Paris and were more graceful and comfortable. In November 1874 was put into operation Pokrovskaya line (from Lubyanka Square to Pokrovsky bridge; lenght - 7.47 km), in 1875 - Sretenskaya, Sokolnicheskaya, Nizhegorodskaya, Sofiyskaya and Bolotnaya lines. In 1875 horse-drawn trams carried 8 mln. passangers. For exploitation of tram network Count Uvarov and Co in 1875 established "First company of horse-drawn railways in Moscow". By end of 1876 this company has built tram network at main radial urban streets with total lenght 29 km, serviced by 82 tram cars and three horse-tram depots; in 1880-1881 lenght of tram network was extended to 35 km; in 1891 there were 11 lines with total lenght 48 km and five horse-tram depots (1539 horses, 235 cars; daily use - 152 cars).

In 1880 councilor of State, engineer Andrey Gorchakov offered project of second tram network, which must be built at minor radial urban streets, at Boulevard Ring and Garden Ring, as well at some suburban districts. The contract between Gorchakov and city authorities was signed on November 27, 1883. The city authorities had a right to redeem this tram network after 20 years after the conclusion of the contract. In March 1885 Andrey Gorchakov handed the agreement with all rights and liabilities to Belgian joint stock company “Main company of horse-drawn railways in Moscow and Russia”, which was founded in Brussels on January 17, 1885. In Moscow it was known as "Belgian company" or "Second company of horse-drawn railways".

Belgian company has built lines of second tram network in 1885-1887. The first Yekaterininskaya line (from Trubnaya Square to Catherine Park) of second tram network was opened on July 15, 1885. On July 29, 1885 was put into operation Dolgorukovskaya line (from Strastnoy Monastery to Butyrskaya Outpost), in September 1885 - two lines along Boulevard Ring and Garden Rings. The one-floor cars for second tram network were manufactured in Odessa factory. In May 1885 they become supplied to Moscow. There were two types of tram car - "summer car" (opened) and "winter car" (closed). The capacity of those trams was 20 seats. In 1886 Belgian company has built first line of steam tram (from Butyrskaya Outpost to village Petrovsko-Razumovskoe; put into operation on July 29, 1886), in 1887 - second line (from present-day Gagarin Square to former village Sparrow Hills). In 1888 there were 10 lines of second tram network with total lenght 39.6 km; In 1889-1891 second tram network was extended to 46 km (13 lines, including two lines of steam tram; three horse-tram depots).

However, existence in a city two separate tram networks of different companies have been extremely inconvenient as for the Muscovites, as for the companies. Therefore, in 1890-1891 companies agreed with city authorities to merge two networks into one and to exploit it together. "First company of horse-drawn railways in Moscow" was responsible for the exploitation of all network, while Belgian company received 1/3 of total proceeds for the year. Such common exploitation was started since November 13, 1891. All pre-existing routes of horse-drawn trams were revised and from that day began to operate 25 new lines. Passengers could travel in all directions with one interchange ticket, that reduced the cost of travel for the majority of Muscovites and significantly increased the number of tram passengers. The lines were divided on zones. For the trip within one zone passangers were paid 5 kopecks or 0.05 rubles (inside wagon) and 3 kopecks or 0.03 rubles (at "imperial"), for two zones - 10 and 6 kopecks respectively. The cost of ticket for transfer on other line was 5 kopecks. This ticket was valid within one hour. Common tram network had lenght 94 km, 9 horse-tram depots, serviced by 2000 horses and 400 tram cars. In 1894-1896 the horse-trams carried 47.5 mln. passengers (till 20 mln. per year). In April-September trams worked from 7:00am till 11:00pm, in other months - from 8:00am till 10:00pm. In 1901, city authorities started buying out horse-railway property from joint-stock societies. This process continued until 1911. In 1912 it was replaced with electric tram.


Е.Н. Захарова

1887. 1st Tverskaya-Yamskaya street. First tram line to the Triumphal arch near Brestsky (now Belorussky) Rail Terminal:

SanSani4(р)

End of 19th-beginning of 20th century. Rozhdestvensky (Nativity of Mary) Boulevard:

SanSani4(р)

1900s. Winter tram car. Capacity - 20 seats; 30 standing:

Андрей Кравчук

1903. Tram car with lamp. Capacity - 20 seats; 30 standing:

Андрей Кравчук

Moscow Uprising of December 1905. Barricade of tram cars at Forest street:

dedushkin
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Old August 10th, 2011, 05:38 PM   #1217
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1900. Horsecar in Moscow:

Кирилл

1900s. Serpukhov Square:

Вячеслав Кудинов

1907. Taganka Square:

Вячеслав Кудинов

Maroseyka street:

1-9-6-3

1900s. Maroseyka street:

dedushkin1

Theatre Square:

oldmos
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Old August 10th, 2011, 05:38 PM   #1218
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1902, St. Paraskeva Pyatnitsa street:

oldmos

1906. Novogireevo settlement, Moscow Region (now part of Moscow):

oldmos

1900s. Prechistenskaya Enbankment, Greater Stone Bridge:

Андрей Кравчук

1900s, Greater Stone Bridge:

kudinov-da

1900. Lubyanka Square:

Артём Светлов
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Old August 10th, 2011, 05:39 PM   #1219
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1890s, Small Dmitrov street:

retromoscow

1890s, Iberian Gate:

retromoscow

1900s, Moscow City Hall:

retromoscow

1900s, Novodevichy Convent:

retromoscow

St. Elijah Gate:

retromoscow

Horse-drawn tram. Episodes from the Russian mini-series "Doctor Zhivago" (2006, director - Alexander Proshkin):
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Old August 10th, 2011, 05:40 PM   #1220
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May 1, 2009. Repetition of the historical parade, devoted to the 110-anniversary of Moscow electric tram:

presten2009

June 13, 2009. Celebration of the 110-anniversary of Moscow tram:

Link


Link

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