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Old November 24th, 2011, 12:34 AM   #1541
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1900s, Mosque at the end of Millionnaya street (now Soviet street):

SimplyMax

1900s, Millionnaya street (now Soviet street):

SimplyMax

1910s, Millionnaya street (now Soviet street):

Link

1900s, Millionnaya street (now Soviet street):

Link

1912, Millionnaya street (now Soviet street):

elenkadem
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Old November 24th, 2011, 12:35 AM   #1542
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1900s, Governorate School at Three Holy Hierarchs street:

elenkadem

1900s, Three Holy Hierarchs street:

SimplyMax

1900s, Three Holy Hierarchs street:

SimplyMax

1910s, Three Holy Hierarchs street:

SimplyMax
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Old November 24th, 2011, 12:37 AM   #1543
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1900s, Octagonal Square (now Lenin Square):

elenkadem

1910s, crossing of tramlines at the Judicial Square (former Octagonal Square, now Lenin Square). Perspective of the Three Holy Hierarchs street:

SimplyMax

1900s, The building of the Revenue Department (now Bank of Russia) at Octagonal Square (now Lenin Square):

history-tver

1910s, Judicial Square (former Octagonal Square, now Lenin Square). Vladimir Church and Regional Court on the background:

SimplyMax

1900s, Octagonal Square (now Lenin Square):

Link

1910s, "Brill" tramcar near Regional Court (now City Administration):

Linkk
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Old November 24th, 2011, 12:39 AM   #1544
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In 1987, to the City Day, was made replica of the first "Brill" tramcar. Originally it was used for excursion trips and worked during national holidays in the summer period (two-three times per year). However, in the late 1990s tramcar became worthless. It was sold in 2000 and put at Three Holy Hierarchs street, where earlier was tramline. During last decade it was used by different owners as trade site.

May 30, 2004. Shop of cellular communication:

Vladislav Prudnikov

May 30, 2004. Shop of cellular communication:

Vladislav Prudnikov

October 16, 2004. Office of aviatickets:

Артём Светлов

June 26, 2005. Salon of "Euroset" company, mobile phone retailer:

Артём Светлов
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Old November 24th, 2011, 12:40 AM   #1545
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July 12, 2008. Salon of "Euroset" company:

fotobalakovo

August 19, 2008. Salon of "Euroset" company:

IG

April 11, 2009. Shop of draft beer:

Евгений Акинфеев

February 10, 2010. Salon of MTS company, the leader among Big Three largest mobile phone operators in Russia (MTS, "MegaFon" and "Beeline"):

Евгений Акинфеев

July 16, 2011. Salon of MTS company:

Евгений Акинфеев
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Old November 24th, 2011, 09:51 AM   #1546
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Minsk Metro

Sorry, I realize this is not a Russian metro, but if anyone is interested, they're currently building a 4-stop extension of Metro Line 1 in the southwest side of Minsk, Belarus. They recently had an emergency drill in the first outbound station in this extension (Grushevka).

Here is a photo of this station under construction:


source: http://strenger.livejournal.com/83620.html

more info here:
http://strenger.livejournal.com/83620.html
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Old November 26th, 2011, 12:20 AM   #1547
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ST. PETERSBURG METRO

November 24-25, station "Admiralteyskaya" ("Admiralty"). One month before the opening:

An_ToxA

Vestibule of the station:

RAID

Mosaic panel over the big escalator tunnel:

RAID

Big escalator tunnel:

RAID
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Old November 26th, 2011, 12:22 AM   #1548
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Platform of the station:

Antoha 2012


Antoha 2012

Central hall:

Antoha 2012

1st side platform, way to the "Sportivnaya" ("Sportive") station:

Antoha 2012

2nd side platform, way to the "Sportivnaya" ("Sportive") station:

Antoha 2012
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Old November 26th, 2011, 12:23 AM   #1549
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Central hall again:

Antoha 2012

Mosaic panel in the end of central hall:

Antoha 2012

Passageway to the side of small escalator tunnel:

Antoha 2012

Passageway to the side of small escalator tunnel:

Antoha 2012

Small escalator tunnel:

Antoha 2012
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Old November 27th, 2011, 11:36 AM   #1550
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haha. "small escalator tunnel" is very large.

Great updates!
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Old November 27th, 2011, 03:03 PM   #1551
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NIZHNY NOVGOROD - BOR CABLEWAY

Nizhny Novgorod station:

Link


Link


Link


Link

Bor town:

Link
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Old November 27th, 2011, 03:04 PM   #1552
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KAZAN METRO

November 24, 2011. Beginning of the construction of the 1359-meters left tunnel between "Dekabristov" ("Decembrists") and "Kozya sloboda" ("Goat Settlement") stations:

metshin

TBM "Aisylu" at the station "Dekabristov" ("Decembrists"):

metshin


metshin

Ilsur Metshin, Mayor of Kazan (right):

metshin


metshin
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Old November 27th, 2011, 03:06 PM   #1553
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metshin


metshin

Smashing of the bottle of champagne:

metshin

Metro builders:

metshin

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Old November 27th, 2011, 11:33 PM   #1554
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KAZAN METRO

November 26, 2011. Construction of the additional exits from the "Prospekt Pobedy" ("Victory Avenue") station, which was opened on December 29, 2008:

Teamsky


Teamsky


Teamsky


Teamsky
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Old November 27th, 2011, 11:45 PM   #1555
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Any updates?
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Old November 28th, 2011, 12:30 AM   #1556
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20) October 20, 1901 - Smolensk:

Smolensk is a city and the administrative center of Smolensk Region, located on the Dnieper River. Situated 360 kilometers (220 miles) west-southwest of Moscow, this walled city was destroyed several times throughout its long history since it was on the invasion routes of Polish-Lithuanian aggressors, Napoleon Bonaparte and Adolf Hitler.

Early history

The name of the city is derived from the name of the Smolnya Rivulet. The origin of the hydronym is less clear. One possibility is the old Slavic word "smol" for black soil, which might have coloured the waters of the long-derelict Smolnya. An alternative origin could be the Russian word "smola", which means resin, tar, or pitch. Pine trees grow in the area, and city was once a center of resin processing and trade. Another possibility is that it is named after the Swedish region of Småland, where it is theorized that a large number of the Norse Rus (Varangian) travellers most likely originated from in the 9th and 10th centuries ie: Småländsk (modern Swedish) - Smolensk.

Smolensk is among the oldest of Russian cities. The first recorded mention of the city was 863 AD, two years after the founding of ancient Russia. According to "Russian Primary Chronicle", Smolensk (probably located slightly downstream, at the archaeological site of Gnezdovo) was the capital of the Slavic Krivichi tribe in 882 when Oleg of Novgorod took it in passing from Novgorod to Kyiv. The town was first attested two decades earlier, when the Varangian chieftains Askold and Dir, while on their way to Kyiv, decided against challenging Smolensk on account of its large size and population. The first foreign writer to mention the city was the Byzantine Emperor Constantine Porphyrogenitus. In "De Administrando Imperio" (c. 950) he described Smolensk as a key station on the Trade route from the Varangians to the Greeks. The Rus sailed from the Baltics up the Western Dvina as far as they could then they pulled their boats out onto the ground and dragged them along to the upper Dnieper. It was in Smolensk that they supposedly mended any leaks and small holes that might have appeared in their boats from being dragged on the ground and they used tar to do that, hence the city name.

The Principality of Smolensk was founded in 1054. Due to its central position amid Russian lands, the city developed rapidly. By the end of the 12th century, the princedom was one of the strongest in Eastern Europe, so that Smolensk dynasty frequently controlled the Kievan throne. Numerous churches were built in the city at that time, including the Church of Sts Peter and Paul (1146, reconstructed to its presumed original appearance after World War II) and Church of St John the Baptist (1180, also partly rebuilt). The most remarkable church in the city is called Svirskaya (1180-1197, still standing); it was admired by contemporaries as the most beautiful structure to the east of Kyiv. Smolensk had its own veche (popular assembly) since the very beginning of its history. Its power increased after the disintegration of Kyivan Rus, and although it was not as strong as the veche in Novgorod the princes had to take its opinion into consideration, a few times in 12th-13th centuries there was an open conflict between them.

Although spared the Mongol armies in 1240, Smolensk paid tribute to the Golden Horde, gradually becoming a pawn in the long struggle between Lithuania and Grand Duchy of Moscow. The last sovereign monarch of Smolensk was Yury of Smolensk; during his reign the city was taken by Vytautas the Great of Lithuania on three occasions, in 1395, 1404 and 1408. After the city's incorporation into the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, some of Smolensk's boyars (e.g., the Sapiehas) moved to Vilnius; descendants of the ruling princes (e.g., the Tatishchevs, Kropotkins, Mussorgskys, Viazemskis) fled to Moscow. With tens of thousands of people living there, Smolensk was probably the largest city in 15th-century Lithuania. Three Smolensk regiments proved decisive during the Battle of Grunwald against the Teutonic Knights on July 15, 1410. It was a severe blow to Lithuania when the city was taken by Vasily III of Russia in 1514. To commemorate this event, the tsar founded the Novodevichy Convent in Moscow (New Maidens Convent, now UNESCO World Heritage Site) and dedicated it to the icon of Our Lady of Smolensk.

In order to repel future Polish-Lithuanian attacks, Russian Tsar Boris Godunov made it his priority to heavily fortify the city. The stone Kremlin constructed in 1597–1602 by great architect Fyodor Kon is the largest in Russia. It features thick walls and numerous watchtowers. Heavy fortifications did not prevent the fortress from being taken by the Polish–Lithuanian aggressors in 1611 after a long 20-months siege (1609-1611), during the Time of Troubles and Dimitriads. The remaining defenders of the city locked themselves in the Assumption Cathedral and then set fire to the gunpowder in the ammunition depot in the church’s basement on June 3, 1611. The explosion that followed caused the roof to collapse, killing all the people inside, who preferred death to being taken prisoner by the Poles. However, during the siege of the Polish aggressors have lost a lot of people and resources. As a result, the Polish King Sigismund III Vasa did not send additional troops to support Polish occupiers in Moscow. At next year aggressors were kicked out from the Russian capital.

Weakened Russia temporarily ceded Smolensk land to the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in the Truce of Deulino 1618 and for the next forty-three years (1611-1654) it was the capital of the Smolensk Voivodeship. Polish occupants forcibly imposed Catholicism, many Orthodox churches were turned into Kostels. To liberate the city, Russia launched the so-called "Smolensk War" against the Commonwealth in 1632. After a defeat at the hands of King Wladislaw IV, the city remained in Polish-Lithuanian hands. In 1632, the Uniate bishop Lew Kreuza built his apartments in Smolensk; they were later converted into the Orthodox Church of Saint Barbara. The hostilities resumed in 1654 when the Commonwealth was being affected by the uprising of Ukrainian Cossacks under leadership of Bogdan Khmelnitsky (1648-1654). After another siege, on September 23, 1654 Smolensk was liberated by Russia. In the 1667 Truce of Andrusovo, the weakened Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth finally renounced its claims to Smolensk.

Smolensk has been a special place to Russians for many reasons, not least for the fact that the local cathedral housed one of the most venerated Orthodox icons, attributed to St. Luke. In the end of 17th century began restoration of the city, which was damaged as result of wars against Polish-Lithuanian aggressors. Building the new Cathedral of the Assumption was a great project which took almost a century to complete (1673-1772). Despite slowly sinking into economic backwater, Smolensk was still valued by Russian Emperors as a key fortress defending the route to Moscow. During the Great Northern War (1700-1721), Smolensk stood in the way of the invaders. Peter the Great came to the city several times to make sure that it was well fortified to fend off the attacks of the advancing Swedish troops. And when the Russian army defeated the Swedish corps led by General Adam Ludwig Lewenhaupt, near Lesnaya, a village not far from Smolensk, Peter the Great welcomed the victorious Russian troops from the Smolensk Town Hall in October 1708. In the same year Smolensk was made the capital of Governorate.

The year of 1812 added a glorious page to the history of the city. After Napoleon's invasion, the 1st and 2nd Russian armies, acting initially on their own, united not far from Smolensk where Napoleon's advancing troops met with fierce resistance. The Russian soldiers repulsed the attacks of the French with great courage. In August 16, 1812, two of the largest armies ever assembled clashed in Smolensk. During the hard-fought battle, described by Leo Tolstoy in his novel "War and Peace", Napoleon's Grande Armée (with active participation of Polish troops) entered the city. During the two days Grande Armée lost about 20 thousand soldiers and officers. Total losses were estimated at 30000 men. The city was almost completely ruined - 80% of houses were burned, 317 of 345 shops were destroyed, population decreased at half. However, the joining of the two Russian armies under the command of Michael Barclay de Tolly and Pyotr Bagration frustrated Napoleon's plan to rout them one by one and predetermined the outcome of the Battle of Borodino. On November 17, 1812 French aggressors left the city. Before retreat, according to the order of Marshal Michel Ney, uncivilized French barbarians blew up eight towers of the Smolensk Kremlin. Apart from other military monuments, downtown Smolensk features the Eagles monument, unveiled in 1912 to mark the centenary of Napoleon's Russian campaign.

After great Russian victory in the war against Napoleon's invaders, the city became slowly restored. In late-19th century through Smolensk were built three railways: Riga-Oryol (1868), Moscow-Brest (1870) and Ryazan-Ural (1899). It became new impulse for the city development. The population of Smolensk was 33890 people in 1881, 45870 - in 1897 and about 59 thousands people - in 1910. By 1900, there were 10 squares, 139 streets, 3261 buildings (including 633 stone), 32 Orthodox Churches, one Catholic Church, one Lutheran Church, two Synagogues, three Monasteries, 33 schools (including one male and one female gymnasiums), 5 printing houses, one chromolithography house, 40 doctors, 27 male and 7 female feldshers, 12 midwifes, 6 pharmacies, 6 drug stores, 8 hospitals with 484 beds, two private hospitals and one provincial hospital in Smolensk.

In 1911-1912, to the centenary of the glorious victory, great Russian photographer Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky (1863-1944) made photosession at the places, which witnessed the European aggression, Russian victories and beginning of the collapse of Napoleon's Empire (Kaunas, Vilnius, Verkhnedvinsk, Minsk, Vitebsk, Daugavpils, Krasny, Vyazma, Smolensk, Polotsk, Mozhaysk, Borodino Battlefield, Maloyaroslavets, Berezina River). I offer feel the atmosphere of Smolensk one hundred years ago.

1912. Assumption Cathedral, dedicated to the heroic defense of Smolensk residents in the war against Polish–Lithuanian aggressors (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912, Assumption Cathedral in Smolensk. View from the east (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912. Miraculous icon "Theotokos of Smolensk" in the Assumption Cathedral (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky). Unfortunately, it was lost during Nazi occupation of Smolensk in 1941-1943:

Link
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Old November 28th, 2011, 12:32 AM   #1557
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1912, wall of the Smolensk Kremlin. Pozdnyakov Tower and Laughing Tower (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912, wall of the Smolensk Kremlin. Eagle Tower and Pozdnyakov Tower (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912, wall of the Smolensk Kremlin. St. Abraham Gate and Eagle Tower (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912, wall of the Smolensk Kremlin. Voronina Tower and Altar Tower (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912, Gur Tower of the Smolensk Kremlin. View from Lopatin Garden (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912, part of Kremlin wall on Kazan Hill. It was blown up by French aggressors on November 17, 1812 (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912. Saints Peter and Paul Church (1146) (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912. Transfiguration Cathedral of the St. Abraham Monastery (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912, monument to 1812 at Lopatin Garden. It was opened on November 17, 1841, to the 29-anniversary of liberation of Smolensk from French aggressors (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link
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Old November 28th, 2011, 12:33 AM   #1558
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1912, view from Lopatin Garden. Svirskaya Church (1180-1197) on the background (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912, north-western part of Smolensk. Saints Peter and Paul Church (1146) on the background (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912, Smolensk beyond the Dnieper River (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912, Dnieper River (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link

1912, north-eastern part of Smolensk with Kremlin wall (color photo of Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky):

Link
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Old November 28th, 2011, 12:34 AM   #1559
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Construction of electric tram network

The first electric lights in the Smolensk Governorate appeared in private companies: on July 13, 1894 two electric light bulbs were lit by Gerhardi roll factory in Smolensk, in January 1898 electricity came on Khludov's Yartsevsky cotton factory, in May 1898 - on Smolensk Efremenkov's brewery.

The idea of creation of public transport system in Smolensk began to discussed in 1890s. Unlike many other Russian cities, project of horse-drawn tram has never been considered in Smolensk due to hilly terrain. In February 1899 City Council got two proposals for construction of electric tram and electric lighting in Smolensk. It were made by Russian electric company "Union" and electric joint stock society "Schuckert and Co". On April 7, 1899, according to Order of the City Council, electric company "Union" got right for construction of power station for electric lighting and electric tram network. "Union" was Russian joint stock company, but with a predominance of the Belgian capital. Its proposal was more profitable for city authorities.

The contract between "Union" company and city officials was signed on July 17, 1900. According to contract, "Union" company had rights for exploitation of tram network and energy produced by power station during 40 years. The city authorities had right to purchase tram enterprise after a certain term. After signing of contract, began construction works. It was necessary: to built power station, tram depot, tramways and overhead lines; to replan the streets, where will be built tramlines; to made passages in the defensive Kremlin wall near St. Nicholas Gate-Tower and Molokhovskaya Gate-Tower. After completion of construction of railways, Smolensk became divided into two parts. A trip from one part to another was severely hampered, as this route led through rail tracks. And in order that the tram could get in Zadneprovsky part of the city (beyond the Dnieper River), in 1899 began construction of the viaduct (overpass) over the ways of the Moscow-Brest and Riga-Oryol railway. It was built in two years and consisted of "two parallel rectangular open-work of tunnels".

The power station was built at the left bank of Dnieper River, beyond the defensive Kremlin wall, near the Armenian street (now Sobolev street). It was near old wooden bridge across Dnieper River, on which was built tramline from Rail Terminal to the city center. Its power by today's standards, was small: two steam engines, drives a generator, producing direct current voltage in the 470 and 700 volts with a total capacity of 300 kilowatts. Construction work were carried out quickly enough. Workers were recruited from all over Russia. The work was done simultaneously at all sites from the morning until late evening, but the salary was only 65 kopecks (0.65 rubles) per day. The tramlines were built from Rail Terminal in two directions: southern (to the city centre) and northern (up to the Governorate Hospital on Intercession Hill). The construction works were finished in August 1901.

The testing of electric lighting was been made at Trinity Highway (now Big Soviet street) on October 17, 1901. On October 18 power station was fully put into operation. The tram network was opened on October 20, 1901. There were built two single-track (1 meter wide) tramlines with several passing loops. One line led from the Rail Terminal to the city centre via Dnieper Gate of Smolensk Kremlin; along the New Moscow street, wooden bridge across Dnieper River and Big Annunciation street (now Big Soviet street). After this, line was divided on two branches. One branch led to Pavel Engelhardt street (now Dzerhinsky street); along the Pushkin street (now Lenin street) and St. Elijah street (now October Revolution street) - tramline at two latter streets was laid near northern and western sides of the Blonye Garden. This branch was built through Gubernatorial Break in the Kremlin wall, which was made during 1812-1817 and expanded in 1870. The second branch led to St. Nicholas Gate-Tower, along the St. Nicholas street (now Tukhachevsky street). The routes were: Rail Terminal - St. Nicholas Gate and Rail Terminal - Gubernatorial Break.

On October 20, 1901 was also opened third route - from Rail Terminal to the Governorate Hospital on Intercession Hill. Unfortunately, opening day was marred by tragic accident. Due to breakage of brake, one of the tramcars lost control and crashed into a Kremlin wall. Some passengers were injured as result of it. For this reason, during two months after opening, tramcars in the city center were almost empty - people feared for own life. Due to combination of adverse factors (imperfect construct of brakes, steep profile of route, small radii of turns at the lower part of hill), the route to Intercession Hill was closed after opening day for half of year. It was reopened at spring of 1902.

Nevertheless, despite of this tragic accident, city officials did not stop the development of the tram network. The tramline at the centre was been extended. In 1903 its branch was extended from the St. Nicholas Gate-Tower to the Officers Settlement. During construction, there was built arch (1900-1901) in the Kremlin wall near St. Nicholas Gate-Tower. On October 14, 1903 was put into operation another branch from St. Nicholas street (now Tukhachevsky street) to the Molokhovskaya Square (now Victory Square); along the Big Annunciation street (now Big Soviet street). For this reason, was built another arch in the defensive Kremlin wall - near Molokhovskaya Gate-Tower. Therefore, total length of tram network increased till 6.39 km.

In November 1901 first electric lighting at the Smolensk streets was put into operation by "Union" company. Initially there were 40 street lights, in 1903 this number increased on 6, in 1913 - on four. The capacity of tram depot was 5 tramcars and two places for repairment. There were used Belgian "Union" tramcars with capacity of 30 persons. It operated till 9:00pm. Its maximal speed was 12.8 km/h. There were exploited 5 tramcars at the line from Rail Terminal to the Intercession Hill and 6 - at the line from Rail Terminal to the city centre. Since November 1903, according to the decree of City Council, was introduced travel price (5 kopecks or 0.05 rubles) for trip by one route. Discount price for the students was 3 kopecks and free for policemen. It was not cheap, but cheaper than trip by horse-driven coach. The work of tram drivers and controllers was very hard, because tramcars were opened-type and it was very cold at autumn and winter.

Before 1914, only men worked in tramcars. After beginning of WWI, male workers were mobilized at the front, and owners of tram network were forced to hire women. Olympiada Babenkova became the first woman, who was hired at the work by tram driver in 1914. She worked in Smolensk Tramway during next 45 years (!!!).

In 1907, on the basis of the Smolensk branch of "Union" company, was established new joint venture - "Smolensk electric company" with the board in St. Petersburg. Since the beginning of WWI, "Smolensk electric company" worked with the increased load. Power station generated energy not only for tram network and street lighting, but also for 16 hospitals, workshops and enterprises working for military purposes. The part of workers was mobilized on front. By the end of 1916, the concession contract between Smolensk electric company "Union" and City Council was terminated. The city officials has carried out early redemption of the enterprise, having paid 470 thousand rubles. They made inventory of property, which was in poor condition - being under the threat of early redemption since 1909, former owners didn't made necessary repairing works.

Tram network was nationalized in 1918, after October Revolution of 1917. In March 1918, while the city remained a part of Russia, Belarusian People’s Republic, proclaimed in Minsk under the German occupation, declared Smolensk a part of it. In February–December 1918, Smolensk was home to the headquarters of the Western Front, North-West Region Bolshevik Committee and Western Region Executive Committee. On January 1, 1919, the Belarusian Soviet Socialist Republic was proclaimed in Smolensk, but its government moved to Minsk as soon as the German forces had been driven out of Minsk several days later. After this, on January 16, 1919 Smolensk Region was given to the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, but Belarusian party leaders hoped for the possibility of including of this territory into their republic till 1926. In August 1919 tram operation in Smolensk was stopped for many months.

1900-1901, construction of the tram network:

Link

1901. Tramcar, which involved in an accident on the opening day:

Link

1901. Tramcar, which involved in an accident on the opening day:

Link

1905, tram workers in depot:

Link

November 4, 1901. The letter of the "Union" company to City Council (request a detailed plan of the city streets with marked sites for the installation 40 street lamps, for the first electric street lighting in the city):

Link

Map of Smolensk in 1913-1915. Blue line - tram network:

Link
CLICKABLE

Scheme of Smolensk tram network in 1901-1917:
1 - tram depot near embankment of Dnieper River;
2 - St. Paraskeva Pyatnitsa overpass across railways;
3 - Rail Terminal of the Riga-Oryol railway;
4 - women’s prison near railway;
5 - Governorate Hospital on the Intercession Hill, terminus station of tramline;
6 - Assumption Cathedral, not so far from Big Annunciation street (now Big Soviet street);
7 - Lopatin Garden near Kremlin wall;
8 - Blonye Garden near Pushkin street (now Lenin street) and St. Elijah street (now October Revolution street);
9 - St. Nicholas Gate-Tower near St. Nicholas street (now Tukhachevsky street);
10 - Molokhovskaya Gate-Tower near Molokhovskaya Square (now Victory Square);
11 - Governorate engineer office;
12 - Tyshko House near terminus tram station;
13 - building of Horse Breeding near terminus tram station:


Link
CLICKABLE
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Old November 28th, 2011, 12:36 AM   #1560
AlekseyVT
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1900s, Rail Terminal of Riga-Oryol railway:

Link

1900s. Terminal of Riga-Oryol railway:

Etoretro

1900s, Intercession Hill:

kingofobilvion

1900s, "Union" tramcar at the St. Paraskeva Pyatnitsa overpass across railways:

Максимов А.

1900s, "Union" tramcar at the St. Paraskeva Pyatnitsa overpass:

Link
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