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Old December 31st, 2011, 12:51 PM   #1761
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All six tunnels should be built by summer of 2012. The three next stations planned to be opened on May 9, 2013:

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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:16 AM   #1762
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30) December 22, 1908 - Turku, Finland;
31) September 24, 1910 - Odessa, Ukraine;
32) September 25, 1910 - Kulosaari island (now suburb in Helsinki), Finland;
33) January 22, 1912 - Pskov:


Early history

Pskov is an ancient city and the administrative center of Pskov Region, located in the northwest of Russia about 20 kilometers (12 miles) east from the Estonian border, on the Velikaya River. The name of the city, originally spelled "Pleskov", may be loosely translated as "[the town] of purling waters". Its earliest mention comes in 903, which records that Igor of Kiev (future ruler of Kievan Rus) married a local lady, who became known as St. Olga (she ruled Kievan Rus after Igor's death as regent for their son). Pskovians sometimes take this year as the city's foundation date (St. Olga is considered as founder of the city), and in 2003 a great jubilee took place to celebrate Pskov's 1100th anniversary.

The first prince of Pskov was St. Vladimir's younger son Sudislav. Once imprisoned by his brother Yaroslav, he was not released until the latter's death several decades later. After the disintegration of Kievan Rus in the 12th century, the city of Pskov with its surrounding territories along the Velikaya River, Lake Peipus, Pskovskoye Lake and Narva River became part of the Novgorod Republic. It kept its special autonomous rights, including the right for independent construction of suburbs (Izborsk is the most ancient among them). In 1240, it was taken by the Teutonic knights, but Prince of Novgorod Alexander Nevsky recaptured it several months later during a legendary campaign dramatized in Sergei Eisenstein's 1938 movie. In order to secure their independence from the knights, the Pskovians elected a Lithuanian Prince, named Daumantas, a Roman Catholic converted to Orthodox faith and known in Russia as Dovmont, as their military leader and Prince during 1266-1299. Having fortified the town, Daumantas defeated the Teutonic knights at Battle of Wesenberg (1268) and overran much of Estonia. His remains and sword are preserved in the local Kremlin, and the core of the citadel, erected by him, still bears the name of "Dovmont's town".

Due to Pskov's leading role in the struggle against the Livonian Order, its influence spread significantly. By the 14th century, the town functioned as the capital of a de-facto sovereign republic. The Novgorod boyars formally recognized Pskov's independence in the Treaty of Bolotovo (1348), relinquishing their right to appoint the posadniks (mayors) of Pskov. The city of Pskov remained dependent on Novgorod only in ecclesiastical matters until 1589, when a separate bishopric of Pskov was created and the archbishops of Novgorod dropped Pskov from their title and were created "Archbishops of Novgorod the Great and Velikie Luki". The Pskov Republic had well-developed farming, fishing, blacksmithing, jeweler’s art, and construction industry. Exchange of commodities within the republic itself and its trade with Novgorod and other Russian cities, the Baltic region, and Western European cities made Pskov one of the biggest handicraft and trade centers of Rus. Its most powerful force was the merchants who brought the town into the Hanseatic League (currently Pskov is a member city of the Hanseatic League of New Time and will host Hanseatic Days international festival in 2033).

As opposed to the Novgorod Republic, Pskov never had big feudal landowners, whose estates were smaller and even more scattered than of those in Novgorod. The estates of Pskovian monasteries and churches were much smaller as well. The social relations that had taken shape in the Pskov Republic were reflected in the "Pskov Judicial Charter" (1397), which was one of the principal sources of the all-Russian law code issued in 1497. Peculiarities of the economy, centuries-old ties with Novgorod, frontier status, and military threats led to the development of the veche system in the Pskov Republic. The Princes played a subordinate role. The veche (popular assembly) elected posadniks (mayors) and sotskiys (officials who represented a hundred households), and regulated the relations between feudals, posad people, izborniks (elected officials) and smerds (peasants). The boyar council had a special influence on the decisions of the veche, which gathered at the Trinity Cathedral. The latter also held the archives of the veche and important private papers and state documents. The elective offices became a privilege of several noble families.

For Russia, the Pskov Republic was a bridge towards Europe. For Europe, it was a western outpost of Russia and subject of numerous attacks throughout the history. Unbelievably, the Kremlin (called by Pskovians the Krom) withstood 26 sieges alone. At one point, five stone walls ringed it, making the city practically impregnable. A local school of icon-painting flourished, and local masons were considered the best in Russia. Many peculiar features of Russian architecture were first introduced in Pskov.

The strengthening of ties with Moscow, caused by economic development and foreign policy objectives, Pskov’s participation in the Battle of Kulikovo (1380), and successful joint struggle against the Teutonic Knights and Lithuanians offered conditions for elimination of the independence of the Pskov Republic. Since 1399 Pskov with its adjacent lands became a viceroyalty of Grand Duchy of Moscow with their own namestnik (viceroy) Prince appointed by the Moscow's royalty. In 1510, Grand Prince of Moscow Vasily III arrived in Pskov and pronounced it his land, thus, putting an end to the Pskov Republic and its autonomous rights. The city's ruling body, Pskov Veche, was dissolved and some 300 families of rich Pskovians were deported from the city. Their estates were distributed among the Muscovite service class people. From that time on, the city of Pskov and the lands around it continued to develop as a part of the centralized Russian state, preserving some of its economic and cultural traditions. The deportation of noble families to Moscow is a subject of Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov's opera "The Maid of Pskov" (1872). The downfall of Pskov is recounted in the Muscovite "Story of the Taking of Pskov" (1510), which was lauded by D. S. Mirsky as "one of the most beautiful short stories of Old Russia. The history of the Muscovites' leisurely perseverance is told with admirable simplicity and art. An atmosphere of descending gloom pervades the whole narrative: all is useless, and whatever the Pskovites can do, the Muscovite cat will take its time and eat the mouse when and how it pleases".

As the second largest city of Grand Duchy of Moscow, Pskov still attracted enemy armies. Most famously, it withstood a prolonged siege by a 50.000-strong Polish-Lithuanian army during the final stage (1581-1582) of the Livonian War of 1558-1583. The king Stefan Batory undertook some 31 attacks to storm the city, which was defended mainly by civilians. Even after one of the city walls was broken, the Pskovians managed to fill the gap and repel the attack. This heroic defense played significant role in the Russian history. The potential of Polish-Lithuanian offensive was very weakened. As result, Stefan Batory was forced to signed Treaty of Jam Zapolski (1582). According to this treaty, Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth returned Russian territories, which were captured by its army. "It's amazing how the city reminds me of Paris", wrote one of the Frenchmen present at Batory's siege.

Pskov was besieged by Swedish forces during the final stage (1615-1617) of the Ingrian War of 1610–1617. Swedish troops laid siege to Pskov but Russian generals Vasily Morozov and Fyodor Buturlin held their own until February 27, 1617, when the Treaty of Stolbovo was signed. This treaty stripped Russia of its access to the Baltic Sea and awarded to Sweden the province of Ingria with the townships of Ivangorod, Jama, Koporye and Noteborg. However, such ancient cities as Novgorod, Porkhov, Staraya Russa, Ladoga and Gdov were restituted to Russia. For the second time, successful defense of Pskov allowed Russia to sign peace treaty on more favorable terms than it could be.

Ingria and Karelia were recaptured by Russian Emperor Peter I as result of Great Northern War of 1700-1721. During this war, Pskov was main base of Russian Army. In 1700-1709, Peter the Great many times visited this city. Peter the Great's conquest of present-day Estonian and Latvian territories during the Great Northern War in the early 18th century spelled the end of Pskov's traditional role as a vital border fortress and a key to Russia's interior. As a consequence, the city's importance and well-being declined dramatically, although it has served as a capital of separate Pskov Governorate since 1777.

On February 22, 1859 there was opened railroad at the path St. Petersburg-Pskov, which became part of St. Petersburg-Warsaw Railway since December 27, 1862. Since 1886 began construction of Pskov-Riga Railway, which was opened on August 3, 1889. Those two railways became part of North-Western Railways in 1907. In 1881 there was opened water-conduit. By the end of 19th century, there were 55 factories and plants in the city. The population of Pskov was 21684 residents (1885), 30478 residents (1897) and 32856 residents (1910).

The horse-drawn tram

The first horse-drawn tramline in Pskov Governorate was put into operation in 1890 in Cheryokha village. In December 1900, one of members of the electric committee published in the local newspaper "Helios" article with proposal to build an electric tramline, but it was ignored. In 1904 was built first power station in Pskov. The construction of tram network was started in 1904 and finished in 1906. The first tramline was built from the Rail terminal to the Trade Square (now Lenin Square) and later to the salt barns at the Narva street (now Leon Pozemsky street) in Zapskovye District. However, due to lack of the necessary electrical power and tramcars an electric tramline was not put into operation.

The initiator of the opening of tramline was Pskov entrepreneur Georg Wickenheiser (1843-1914). He was born in Elsenz, Grand Duchy of Baden and moved in Pskov when he was 20 years old, with almost no money. He was engaged in sausage production and trade. In Pskov Wickenheiser made own business - he built apartment houses and cottages, organized water supply (1881), founded a brickyard and sawmill. In 1880s he built new pier, kursaal (sanatorium) and cottage houses in Cherokha village as well as horse-drawn tramline (1890) from the pier to the kursaal. Wickenheiser was nicknamed "Pskov American" for his pushfulness. He was died in 1914, few months before beginning of WWI.

Together with own son Karl, Georg Wickenheiser decided to open horse-drawn tram at the existing street railways. Wickenheiser's family paid their own money to buy tramcars, horses, and pledged to pay the workers as well as pay monthly rent into town treasury. On November 14, 1909 all six horse-drawn tramcars were put into operation and single-track tramline (1 meter wide) was opened for public. This day was opened part of tramline from Trade Square (now Lenin Square) to the Warsaw Rail Terminal (now Pskov I), later was opened part leading in Zapskovye District beyond the Pskova River. The total lenght of horse-drawn tramline was 4.2 km.

1910-1911. Great street (now Soviet street) in Pskov:

rus-biography

1910-1911. Horse-drawn tram line at Great street (now Soviet street):

pskovrail

1910-1911. St. Sergius street (now October Avenue) in Pskov:

pskovrail

1910-1911. Horse-drawn tram line at St. Sergius street (now October Avenue):

pskovrail

Last edited by AlekseyVT; January 2nd, 2012 at 01:21 AM.
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:18 AM   #1763
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Electric tram

Horse-drawn tram in Pskov worked only during two years. In March 1907, city officials bought the power station and began working to increase its electric capacity to launch an electric tram. By 1910 this problem was solved. In the end of 1911 operation of horse-drawn tram was stopped, and there began works for electrification of tram network. The cost of all works was 180.000 rubles, including: purchasing of 8 tramcars (80.000 rubles), rebuilding of tram tracks (40.000 rubles), installation of overhead lines (20.000 rubles) and equipping of workshop for repairment works (40.000 rubles). The existing tramline was electrified under leadership of engineer Konstantin Repin, who was Member of City Council. He calculated that electric tram will be bring not less than 28% of profit from annual receipts. It will repaid not only all costs, but also will bring significant revenue to the city treasury. During electrification, single-track tramline was regauged from 1000 to 1524 mm.

Electric tram was put into operation on January 22, 1912. Its route did not differ from horse-drawn tram route: Warsaw Rail Terminal (now Pskov-I) - Kokhanov Boulevard (now October Avenue) - St. Sergius street (now October Avenue) - Flat street (now Labour Unions street) - Great street (now Soviet street) - Trinity Bridge (now Soviet Bridge) across Pskova River - Narva street (now Leon Pozemsky street) - salt barns. Along the Pushkin street was built service branch tramline from St. Sergius street (now October Avenue) to the tram depot. There were exploited 8 biaxial tramcars, which were made at Mytishchi Plant near Moscow. Those tramcars had numbers №№11-18. Tram operation was from 6:00am till 9:40pm.

After electrification of tramline, Repin proposed to build another tramline in Pskov. On February 26, 1914 was opened second line of electric tram - from Trade Square (now Lenin Square) to the Riga Rail Station (now Pskov-II); along the Great street (now Soviet street) and St. Alexis street (now Soviet street). Second tramline had direct connection with railway. This is proved by the fact that in different years steam locomotives were used at the urban tramlines (during demonstrations and for cargo transportation).

In late-1910s Pskov again played a significant role in the Russian history, as it was many centuries ago. In 1916 in Pskov was located Staff of Northern Front. The city hosts thousands of refugees and evacuated enterprises from the Baltic land. Its population was 60168 residents in 1917. On March 13, 1917, after beginning of February Revolution in Petrograd (now St. Petersburg), Russian Emperor Nicholas II was forced to leave Stavka (General headquarters of the Russian Imperial Army) in Mogilev, Belarus. He went to his family, in Tsarskoe Selo near Petrograd. However, next day he was informed that railways ahead were seized by mutinous soldiers. Then Nicholas II ordered to turn back and ride in Pskov, where was located Staff of Northern Front. On March 14, at 7:05pm he arrived in the city. Already the Parliament and the Soviet had formed the nucleus of a Provisional Government and decided that Nicholas II must abdicate. Faced with this demand, which was echoed by his generals, deprived of loyal troops, with his family firmly in the hands of the Provisional Government and fearful of unleashing civil war and opening the way for German conquest, Nicholas II had no choice but to submit. On March 15, 1917, at 3:05pm, in the salon of Imperial train, which stayed at Warsaw Rail Terminal in Pskov, he signed Manifesto of abdication from the throne. It was end of the Romanov dynasty, and the end of the Russian Empire.

On November 8, 1917 Bolsheviks took power in Pskov. On February 24, 1918 German troops took the city. As result of German invasion, on March 3, 1918 Bolshevik Goverment was forced to sign Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, marking Russia's exit from World War I. German troops remained in Pskov during nine months in 1918. During occupation, they established and armed the Northern Corps (Armed formation of White Army forces), and recreated pre-Revolutionary regional government agencies (for example, Pskov City Council). On November 25, 1918 Red Army troops recaptured city. White Army troops were defeated, German troops retreated without fight. However, on May 25, 1919 White Estonians and White Army troops under leadership of Belarusian-Polish colonel Stanisław Bułak-Bałachowicz captured city again. Bułak-Bałachowicz became the military administrator of Pskov. He became organizer of the medieval brutal public executions of hundreds of people on the city streets. In September 1919 Bolsheviks again seized the power in Pskov. On February 2, 1920 was signed Treaty of Tartu, which ended Russian-Estonian war and established border between two states 13 km west of Pskov.

In 1918 tram operation in Pskov was stopped. During four years, steam locomotives sometimes were used at urban tramlines for cargo transportation (second tramline was connected with railway).

Map of Pskov (1914):
Red line - first electric tramline (Warsaw Rail Terminal, now Pskov-I - salt barns at Narva street, now Leon Pozemsky street);
Green line - service branch line to the depot (along the Pushkin street):

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Post-Revolution map of Pskov:
Red line - first electric tramline (Pskov-I Rail Terminal - salt barns at Narva street, now Leon Pozemsky street);
Blue line - second electric tramline (Pskov-II rail station - Lenin Square);
Green line - service branch line to the depot (along the Pushkin street);
X - tram depot:

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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:20 AM   #1764
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1910s, tramcar near St. Nicholas Church at Kokhanov Boulevard (now October Avenue):

pskovrail

1910s, first intermediate tram stop at Kokhanov Boulevard (now October Avenue):

pskovrail

1910s, tramcar at Kokhanov Boulevard (now October Avenue):

pskovrail

1910s. Apartment house of Gerard Stankevich at Kokhanov Boulevard (now October Avenue):

pskovrail

1910s, tramline near Realschule in the end of Kokhanov Boulevard:

pskovrail
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:22 AM   #1765
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1910s, Realschule. Beginning of St. Sergius street:

pskovrail

1910s, tramline near Realschule and Ascension Chapel:

pskovrail

1910s, tramline near Realschule and Ascension Chapel:

pskovrail

1910s, Kohkhanov Boulevard (now October Avenue). View to the side of Kresty settlement:

pskovrail

1910s, tramcars at the passing loop near Realschule at Kohkhanov Boulevard (now October Avenue):

pskovrail
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:22 AM   #1766
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1910s, second intermediate stop (passing loop) at St. Sergius street (now October Avenue). View to the city centre:

pskovrail

1910s, second intermediate stop (passing loop) at St. Sergius street (now October Avenue):

pskovrail

1910s. Tramline near House of Joseph Tulchiev at St. Sergius street (now October Avenue):

pskovrail

1914. Tramcar near House of Ivan Safyanshchikov at St. Sergius street (now October Avenue):

pskovrail
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:24 AM   #1767
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1910s, tramcar near St. James (Lutheran) Church at the crossing of St. Sergius street (now October Avenue) and Governor street (now Nekrasov street):

trip-guide

1910s, crossing of St. Sergius street (now October Avenue) and Pushkin street:

retromoscow

1910s, tramcar at the crossing of St. Sergius street (now October Avenue) and Pushkin street:

pskovrail

1910s, tramcar at the crossing of St. Sergius street (now October Avenue) and Pushkin street. Here it's possible to see branch tramline to the depot (along Pushkin street):

pskovrail

1910s, tramline near House of Franz Spink at St. Sergius street (now October Avenue):

pskovrail
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:25 AM   #1768
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1910s, passing loop at St. Sergius street (now October Avenue). It's interesting that originally there was only one overhead wire. For this reason, it was necessary to fold pantograph at one of two tramcars during passing:

pskovrail

1910s, passing loop at St. Sergius street (now October Avenue). Later here was added second overhead wire:

pskovrail

1910s, crossing of Flat street (now Labour Unions street) and Great street (now Soviet street):

pskovrail

1910s, view at the crossing of Great street (now Soviet street) and Flat street (now Labour Unions street):

pskovrail

1910s. First and second tramlines near Commercial Bank (built by architect Fyodor Nesturkh):

pskovrail
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:26 AM   #1769
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1910s, tramline at Great street (now Soviet street):

pskovrail

1910s, tramline at Great street (now Soviet street):

link

1918, two tramlines at Great street (now Soviet street). This photo was made during German occupation of Pskov:

pskovrail

"Great street". Modern picture of Dmitry Svetlichny (2002):

pskovrail
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:27 AM   #1770
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1910s. Tramcar at Trade Square (now Lenin Square) near Leather Row:

Link

1910s. Fourth tram stop (passing loop) at Trade Square (now Lenin Square):

pskovrail

1914, City Market at Trade Square (now Lenin Square). It's possible to see track of second tramline near the horse-drawn cart:

pskovrail

1910s, passing loop at Trade Square (now Lenin Square). Trinity Cathedral:

pskovrail

1910s, Trade Square (now Lenin Square). Monument to Russian Emperor Alexander II:

pskovrail

1910s, tramline near Flour Row:

pskovrail

1910s, tramline near Flour Row:

pskovrail
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:28 AM   #1771
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View to the Zapskovye District. Tramline was been at Trinity Bridge (now Soviet Bridge) across Pskova River:

trip-guide

Trinity Bridge (now Soviet Bridge) and Trinity Cathedral:

link

Trinity Bridge (now Soviet Bridge) and Trinity Cathedral:

link

1918, tramline between Flour Row and Trinity Bridge (now Soviet Bridge) across Pskova River. This photo was made during German occupation of Pskov:

pskovrail
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:29 AM   #1772
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1910s, second tramline near House of Ivan Gladkov at Great street (now Soviet street):

pskovrail

1910s, second tramline near City Bank (now Central Universal Department Store) at Great street (now Soviet street):

pskovrail

1910s, second tramline near City Bank (now Central Universal Department Store) at Great street (now Soviet street):

pskovrail

1910s, tramline at the crossing of Great street (now Soviet street) and Flat street (now Labour Unions street):

pskovrail
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:31 AM   #1773
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May 1, 1917 (Labour Day). Manifestation at Trade Square (now Lenin Square):

pskovrail

1918, second tramline near Theological Seminarium at Great street (now Soviet street). This photo was made during German occupation of Pskov:

pskovrail

1918, second tramline near St. Nicholas Church at Great street (now Soviet street). This photo was made during German occupation of Pskov:

pskovrail
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Old January 3rd, 2012, 08:00 PM   #1774
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KAZAN METRO

January 1, 2012. Closed southern vestibule of "Kremlyovskaya" ("Kazan Kremlin") station:

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Old January 3rd, 2012, 08:00 PM   #1775
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Opened shops in the vestibule:

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Old January 3rd, 2012, 08:01 PM   #1776
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Northern vestibule of the station "Ploshchad Tukaya" (Ğabdulla Tuqay Square). Construction of the wheelchair ramp:

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Old January 3rd, 2012, 08:02 PM   #1777
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Southern vestibule of the station "Ploshchad Tukaya" (Ğabdulla Tuqay Square):

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Old January 3rd, 2012, 09:07 PM   #1778
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SOME NEW YEARS PHOTOS

Izhevsk:

Алексей Савин

Yekaterinburg:

server021

Nizhny Tagil:

Moscowit

Oryol:

Андрей Киреев
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Old January 3rd, 2012, 09:09 PM   #1779
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Kolomna:

Владимир Сенькин

Kolomna:

Чудо

St. Petersburg:

Григорий Егоров
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Old January 3rd, 2012, 09:10 PM   #1780
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Novosibirsk:

Аннушка

Novosibirsk:

Даниил Ларионов

Nizhny Novgorod:

Антон triangel
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