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Old January 24th, 2007, 04:29 PM   #201
southbalto
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Could someone post the latest rendering of the 4 seasons project.

Thanks
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Old January 24th, 2007, 04:51 PM   #202
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Anyone heard any news on the redevelopment of the largely vacant block of Broadway in Fells Pt?

I know the developers wanted to put an 11 story building somewhere in there and that locals weren't thrilled with that, but that block is pretty pathetic looking for what is one of B-More's most popular areas. Work can't start soon enough there.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 04:53 PM   #203
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There's also an article up on the BBJ site saying that the Historical Commission gave the OK for the plans to turn the Baltimore Brewery off of President St. into a hotel. Good news there.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 06:02 PM   #204
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Wow I can't believe how close BWI is to Baltimore. That's amazing. I wonder if they could build some roadway that could more directly link downtown to the airport.

On another note, I need some help here. I've heard the talk about Maggie Moore's on here and was wondering what it's like with Valentines Day coming up and all. Thanks for your comments in advance.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 06:45 PM   #205
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdeclue View Post
Wow I can't believe how close BWI is to Baltimore. That's amazing. I wonder if they could build some roadway that could more directly link downtown to the airport.
I95 and the BW Pkwy are pretty direct routes to the airport. I wouldnt be in favor of ripping up shit and tearing down neighborhoods to build a third route into BWI.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 06:49 PM   #206
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Originally Posted by waj0527 View Post
I95 and the BW Pkwy are pretty direct routes to the airport. I wouldnt be in favor of ripping up shit and tearing down neighborhoods to build a third route into BWI.
Yes. And don't forget the light rail. How may routes do we need?
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Old January 24th, 2007, 07:43 PM   #207
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Plus the back roads offer a great alternative to the highways during rush hour. Through the city go south on hanover street. Follow Route 2 though cherry hill and brooklyn until you get to the AA County border. Make a right onto MD 170. Follow that to the airport loop road. Piece of cake. those are some great photos though.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 07:49 PM   #208
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Yeah, I forgot about the light rail. Getting to BWI is fine.

As an aside, just last week I was in Georgia and Virginia on a 1 day business trip. Try getting from BWI to Richmond and then Augusta and back without a car. You'll see how easy we have it in Baltimore.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 08:43 PM   #209
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Not sure if this project has been covered too much (which is suprising since it's the largest development site in Baltimore City), but the old plant is about 2/3 torn down. It looks as if they're about ready to break ground on the buildings on the north side of Holabird. They tore up the parking lots that were there, so now it's a huge square lot clean of everything. I'll try to get a couple pics in the next few days.



Baltimore City Planning Comm. approves GM plant replacement
Daily Record, The (Baltimore), Aug 11, 2006 by Jen Degregorio

Find More Results for: "GM Plant Baltimore "
GM to invest in hybrid...
At least 12 bids...
GM's closing of...
Slammed shut; GM...
Duke Realty Corp.'s plan for redeveloping the defunct General Motors assembly plant on Broening Highway won the unanimous approval yesterday of the Baltimore City Planning Commission.

The plan, which calls for an office and industrial park of nearly 2.9 million square feet of space on 180 acres of land, also won support from city residents who say the project will transform Southeast Baltimore's economy.

It's going to add lots of jobs to the area, said Edie Schuman, chair of Southeastern Neighborhoods Development Corp. That part [of Baltimore] has been neglected for a long time.

The $200 million project is projected to bring 3,500 new jobs to Baltimore, according to recent estimates by the Baltimore Development Corp., the city's economic development arm. It will result in a projected $61 million in property taxes over the course of 20 years, according to the BDC.

In addition, the development will create about 920 jobs for unionized construction workers, said Rod Easter, business representative for the Baltimore Building & Construction Trades Council.

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We're looking forward to this project being started, Easter said.

Demolition on the former GM plan began in May. Duke officials are working on a plan for environmental remediation of the site, which should be completed by January. The company expects the physical clean-up to begin by the first quarter of 2007.

No companies have yet signed on for space in the park, said Mark Gialluca, development services manager for Duke, a real estate investment trust based in Indianapolis.

Right now we're concentrating on the demolition and cleanup, he said.

As the Duke park comes on line, it will help Baltimore City compete with surrounding counties that have more land for commercial development, BDC President M.J. Jay Brodie told the planning commission yesterday.

At 180 acres, the former GM site represents the single largest development parcel in Baltimore, he said.

Brodie called Duke's office park a competitor with [email protected], a 1,000-acre business community being built in eastern Baltimore County.

Duke's park represents the past and future of Baltimore wrapped into one, Brodie said.

The GM plant, which closed last year, began more than 70 years ago as the Chevrolet and Fisher Body assembly factory. Over time, it grew to become one of Baltimore's most important economic bastions.

When it closed in May 2005, it took with it 1,100 jobs.

Duke's interest in the site is a great example of how industry is not leaving Baltimore, said Caroline Paff, a senior development officer for the BDC.

Copyright 2006 Dolan Media Newswires
Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning Company. All rights Reserved.
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Old January 24th, 2007, 09:00 PM   #210
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Maryland tackling challenge of BRAC
Lawmakers seek ways to pay for roads, schools as defense jobs grow

By Justin Fenton and Timothy B. Wheeler
Sun reporters
Originally published January 24, 2007

Gov. Martin O'Malley and General Assembly leaders have turned their attention to the roads, schools and other needs created by a looming influx of tens of thousands of military-related jobs, but are in search of a way to pay for them. This week, O'Malley gave Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown his first major assignment: Get a handle on the challenges created by the 40,000 to 60,000 jobs expected to be created in Maryland by the Base Realignment and Closure process, or BRAC.

And today, a panel of lawmakers will hear from planning and business development experts on the challenges that lie ahead. Legislators are considering initiatives that - among other things - would allow the speedy construction of projects related to military job growth.

"We've got some lead time, but not a whole lot," said Timothy Armbruster, president of the Goldseker Foundation, which has prepared a study of BRAC growth. "We better get serious about this or we won't be able to take advantage of the good fortune coming our way."

While local governments in Harford and Anne Arundel counties and elsewhere have been planning for the military jobs, O'Malley's announcement marks the highest-visibility statewide effort to date. O'Malley asked Brown to head a newly created sub-Cabinet of planning, transportation and other state officials to come up with ideas for handling the challenge.

But even Brown, the governor's point man and a lieutenant colonel in the Army Reserve, isn't sure where the discussion will head. "It's unlikely legislation would need to be introduced this session," Brown said. "I need to immerse myself a little more deeply before I can comment."

Hanging in the balance is the quality of life for the new residents and those already here. To accommodate thousands of new Marylanders and their families, state and local governments will have to build schools and roads, deliver water and pipe away waste. Firefighters, police, doctors and others will be needed.

But with Maryland facing a billion-dollar gap between tax revenues and scheduled expenses in the next few years, money to pay for those services is in short supply. O'Malley has said that he will not raise taxes this year.

At the start of last year's Assembly session, officials were celebrating the news that Maryland would be the recipient of thousands more jobs, part of the military's plan approved in November 2005 to build specialized centers for defense operations while cutting costs. Maryland was considered a winner; many states lost jobs.

Since then, some counties have formed task forces to study their needs, which have largely been determined. Now, it's the state's turn. Brown is scheduled to meet today with J. Michael Hayes, a retired Marine Corps brigadier general hired by the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development in 1999 to monitor federal, state and local actions that affect Maryland military installations.

"I believe this session will mostly be a discussion of the things that will be required to make this happen," said Hayes. "This is now the beginning of the dialogue between counties and the state of their [respective] needs. The counties are in a position to move forward and articulate what their needs are."

In separate hearings over the next week, legislative committees will be briefed on BRAC-related issues. Among the broader initiatives being promoted by Maryland counties is a mechanism to allow the legislature to rush projects deemed crucial, such as roads. "Getting approval for transportation projects can be a six-year process, so we need the option of fast-tracking to help those come on board as quickly as possible," said Roxanne Lynch, Harford County's director of government and community relations.

The Greater Baltimore Committee has urged state officials to make BRAC planning a priority, endorsing the idea to streamline the permit process for related projects and create a legislative commission.

"BRAC presents us this tremendous opportunity, but we have to make sure we work in a fashion that we maximize the potential and realize the true benefits it has to offer," said Donald C. Fry, the group's president.
Many private-sector and on-post jobs tied to military bases pay well, and economic development experts say the state will reap sales, income and property taxes from new arrivals.

But Fry cautioned that state and local governments need to act promptly so that the surge in population does not undermine the quality of life of current residents. "The approach of putting the lieutenant governor in charge, which gives it a high profile and power to deal with multiple agencies on this issue, makes all the sense in the world," said John W. Frece, associate director of the National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education at the University of Maryland, College Park.

But Frece, who served as communications director of the Office of Smart Growth under Gov. Parris N. Glendening, questioned how the new sub-Cabinet-level interagency group would relate to a similarly high-level group created years ago to coordinate state spending and policies to prevent sprawl. The two sub-Cabinets share many of the same members.

"There's already a very good, very similar, if not identical, group established in state law for the purpose of dealing with this," Frece said. Brown said the state intends to hire a BRAC coordinator who will work with his sub-Cabinet.

Advocates of managed growth, worried about the potential for BRAC to worsen gridlock and sprawl, welcomed the O'Malley administration's move. With budget problems looming for the state, it is essential for the administration to spend its scarce dollars wisely in preparing for the base-related growth, they said.

"The jury's still out on whether this is going to be a net gain for the state," said Dru Schmidt-Perkins, executive director of 1000 Friends of Maryland. "We can't take the 60,000 or so people and sprawl them all over the place. We don't have the roads, we don't have the schools, we don't have the water. We need to do it right so we don't have a nightmare."

Dan Pontious, regional policy director for the Citizens Planning and Housing Association, said local officials need the state's help in preparing for BRAC-related growth, especially in dealing with the increased traffic it will generate.

"As our highways become more clogged, people are going to be looking for other ways to get to work," Pontious said. The state must invest in enhancing MARC commuter rail lines, he said, which can transport more workers to Aberdeen Proving Ground and Fort Meade while serving the needs of other Maryland commuters.

The Baltimore-based Goldseker Foundation issued a report last fall urging prompt action to enhance the region's transportation network, including highways and transit. The report outlined options for financing costly transportation projects at a time of budget constraints, including dedicating a portion of corporate income or property tax proceeds or borrowing against expected tax revenue from BRAC-related jobs.

Del. Maggie L. McIntosh, a Baltimore Democrat who chairs the House Environmental Matters Committee - which will receive its BRAC briefing today - said the legislature would be wise to start approving projects this year. "We either do it right or we do it wrong, but they've got to begin now," McIntosh said.
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Old January 25th, 2007, 06:21 AM   #211
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Here's a report from the senior Baltimore Park Ranger from a housing-assigned police officer in Sharp-Leadenhall:

You remember the plans to develop Port Covington beyond the Wal-Mart?

Well, the word is that the Wal-Mart will now close because the land is too valuable.

As I say, intriguing info, but more research and verification needed on this...

Nate
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Old January 25th, 2007, 06:33 AM   #212
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I wonder what makes the land so valuable? I've been to that Wal-Mart a few times and I dare say that it may be the only one in the world that sits on a waterfront.
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Old January 25th, 2007, 06:41 AM   #213
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^I always call it the "Wal-Mart-on-the-water".

Nate
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Old January 25th, 2007, 02:29 PM   #214
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmore87 View Post
I wonder what makes the land so valuable? I've been to that Wal-Mart a few times and I dare say that it may be the only one in the world that sits on a waterfront.
the City dropped the ball on that one. What a waste of waterfront property. I dread going there as its dark, dingy and somewhat dangerous. But I have to admit, it is handy in a pinch. But I would be glad to see something different go in there. There is so much land, i am wondering why the developer didn't put the big boxes inland realizing that waterfront some day would probably be a bit more vauleable.
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Old January 25th, 2007, 02:40 PM   #215
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Nice, this is what I'm talking about!

From Today's Sun
Park's path: Folly to neglect, rebirth
A median garden downtown is to regain its 1920s grandeur

Between this and center plaza, maybe we can begin to establish a real sense of downtown greenspace. We don't have Rittenhouse square -- sigh -- but we're at least moving in the right direction.
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Old January 25th, 2007, 02:44 PM   #216
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Lofty dreams for Railway Building

http://www.mddailyrecord.com/article...=252&type=UTTM
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Old January 25th, 2007, 02:50 PM   #217
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On a sad note, we've hit a rate of one homicide per day. Call me crazy, but Lenny Hamm, the State's Attorney, and other folks just aren't on the ball with this one. This is the worst possible news the city could have at this time. I've also noticed that, in charles village, a lot of the regular nightly flyovers with Foxtrot have stopped in the last two weeks. Are they still doing heavy air patrol?
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Old January 25th, 2007, 03:06 PM   #218
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Port of Baltimore doing very well!

http://www.examiner.com/a-527640~Sta...Baltimore.html
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Old January 25th, 2007, 03:20 PM   #219
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffbaltimore View Post
the City dropped the ball on that one. What a waste of waterfront property. I dread going there as its dark, dingy and somewhat dangerous. But I have to admit, it is handy in a pinch. But I would be glad to see something different go in there. There is so much land, i am wondering why the developer didn't put the big boxes inland realizing that waterfront some day would probably be a bit more vauleable.
i agree, jeff. IT IS indeed dark, dingy, and dangerous and the sad part of that is the port covington wal-mart is one of the newest ones in this area. whew, talk about nastiness!!

i've heard stories of alot of robberies and shoplifting there. i've even witnessed a couple of robberies and shopliftings myself. i'll never, ever go to that wal-mart again.
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Old January 25th, 2007, 03:43 PM   #220
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Quote:
Originally Posted by getontrac View Post
Here's a report from the senior Baltimore Park Ranger from a housing-assigned police officer in Sharp-Leadenhall:

You remember the plans to develop Port Covington beyond the Wal-Mart?

Well, the word is that the Wal-Mart will now close because the land is too valuable.

As I say, intriguing info, but more research and verification needed on this...

Nate

Wow, intriguing indeed. I wonder if the land is on a PUD or if it was rezoned. I know that Industrial interests were upset when it went big box because it was the last developable parcel with deep water access in the city. If it closes, I wonder if the port will try and retake it.

That's a massive amount of land, and could very well tie into the future plans for Middle Branch. SBER had plans for residential, I think at the old BGE property next door to the new Tidewater Marina, I wonder what's happening with that.

Some good links...

The new marina:
http://www.pcmaritimecenter.com/

An old City Paper article detailing the entire Middle Branch / Port Covington redevelopment plans, including a discussion of how the big box retail was done so very wrong.
http://www.citypaper.com/news/story.asp?id=11385

I'll be curious to hear more about the big box rumors.
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