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Old April 6th, 2007, 12:55 AM   #2641
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^Those areas are high priced and fairly built out, so there's not much growth to be had, esp. NY and Boston.

Even assuming metro Baltimore locked down all development outside the City and Balto. Co. URDL, we'd still have tons to (re)develop!

Nate
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Old April 6th, 2007, 01:19 AM   #2642
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Originally Posted by Silver Springer View Post
So what would you call the 99% left in the state? Suburban Maryland is hardly a distinctive name. I could just as well call the areas outside downtown Baltimore suburban Maryland and it would fit the description more so than Silver Spring or Bethesda. The crazy thing is that downtown Silver Spring has a higher population density than D.C. or Baltimore and geographical size larger than Philly's downtown.
Have family in Bethesda, Rockville, and Gaithersburg, and friends in Silver Spring, so have always referred to them by name individually or collectively as Montgomery County.

SS--not that I'm doubting you or anything, but do you have a source for those density/size comparisons?
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Old April 6th, 2007, 02:58 AM   #2643
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Perhaps it's changed recently, but it used to be that "Suburban Maryland" referred to the suburbs of Washington DC, and "Central Maryland" referred to the Baltimore metropolitan area. Of course there was "Western Maryland", the "Upper-" and "Lower- Eastern Shore" and the much larger combined area of the "Western Shore."

Of course these are all generalizations, so they don't hold any weight if you begin to analyze specifics. And I totally agree with the earlier comment that if you're talking with someone in the Baltimore area, you might tell another person you live in Towson, whereas in another part of the country, you might describe your residence as Baltimore; at best name it as a suburb of Baltimore.

Not really a peeve, but more of an opportunity to chuckle: I get a kick when people not from the area cite local names. Somewhat of a reverse-Bawlamorese with a twist:

Canton
We pronounce it as Cant'n (not the way the city in China is pronounced)

Lancaster, PA
Locals pronounce it as Lanc'ster (not Lan-caster)

Silver Spring
I hear so many people pronounce it as Silver Springs (as if there were many)

Ellicot City
We pronounce it as Ellic't City (not Elli-cot, as in the male name)
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Old April 6th, 2007, 06:27 AM   #2644
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Springer View Post
On a side note does anybody else think "Maryland suburbs" is such dumb term to use to define the Maryland's D.C. side? It's vague and what do you call truly suburban areas around the state? There are urban places here just as dense if not denser and larger than some major cities. National Captial Region of Maryland is far more definitive. This was use more frequently in the past but got lost somehow.
I agree. Maryland suburbs is way too vague. I mean, are we talking about the Baltimore suburbs or the DC suburbs?? There has to be a better way to define that area and it's not just MoCo so we can't just call it that. It includes PG, HoCo and others. There has to be a better way to refer to that region than just Maryland suburbs. In the case of Virginia, Northern Virginia works well. Can't we come up with something for Maryland that describes that region? I hate it when I'm talking to people out of state and trying to describe to them how the DC metro area is and what it includes. It's always either "parts of Maryland" or naming individual counties and/or cities.
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Old April 6th, 2007, 10:42 AM   #2645
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Originally Posted by House3780 View Post
I dont doubt the size or importance or even the coolness of Silver Spring and Bethesda.. but they still remain suburbs of DC. Sure theyre important to our area, but as far as the national scene goes.. its gonna be.. whats a Silver Spring??? And when someone is over in California from Silver Spring and they are asked where are they from.. what do you think theyre gonna say.. "Im from DC" Its no different than someone from Towson saying theyre from Towson when theyre here and goin far away and saying Im from Baltimore.

So as far as the rest of the country is concerned.. DC has suburbs from MD, and suburbs from VA and suburbs from W Va and it distinguishes them as such.

Go Ravens.
Funny, when travelling (or at school in Philly) I always say I'm from Silver Spring outside of DC and more often than not people actually know what I'm talking about. It's more well-known than even I used to think.
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Old April 6th, 2007, 10:50 AM   #2646
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Originally Posted by jamie_hunt View Post
Have family in Bethesda, Rockville, and Gaithersburg, and friends in Silver Spring, so have always referred to them by name individually or collectively as Montgomery County.

SS--not that I'm doubting you or anything, but do you have a source for those density/size comparisons?
Downtown Silver Spring has a density of about 15,800 people per square mile. It's geographical size is comparable to that of Philly's Center City (I wouldn't argue that it's bigger). DC has an overall density of about 9,000 people/sq mile and Baltimore has an overall density of about 7,800 people/sq mile. You can look at geographical size versus population and figure out densities yourself.

Google maps helps with comparisons of CBD sizes (Silver Spring's is actually larger than Baltimore's) though when comparing building density, Silver Spring doesn't come close to that of Philly or Baltimore; of course that's changing every year.
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Old April 6th, 2007, 01:13 PM   #2647
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Quote:
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On a side note does anybody else think "Maryland suburbs" is such dumb term to use to define the Maryland's D.C. side? It's vague and what do you call truly suburban areas around the state? There are urban places here just as dense if not denser and larger than some major cities. National Captial Region of Maryland is far more definitive. This was use more frequently in the past but got lost somehow.
WOW. Feeling a little over-shadowed? I guess you are starting to understand how we in Baltimore feel when we are lumped into the mess known as Washington DC! I think most of us up here don't even want to be part of the National Capital Region. We just want to be what we are. Baltimore.

Last edited by 30 Floors Up; April 6th, 2007 at 01:32 PM.
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Old April 6th, 2007, 03:10 PM   #2648
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Baltimore market continues to outpace the DC suburbs
by Sonny Goldreich | Special to The Gazette
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The Baltimore market’s overall vacancy rate fell to 10.9 percent in the last quarter, down from 12 percent one year ago. The Washington suburban Maryland continued to weaken, with its overall office vacancy rate reaching 10.2 percent at the end of the first quarter of 2007, up from 9.7 percent at the end of 2006, and 8.4 percent one year ago.

Baltimore and its suburbs continue to gather strength from improved long-term prospects driven by the Pentagon’s Base Realignment and Closure Commission recommendations, which are expected to result in as many as 60,000 defense and related industry jobs to Maryland over the next two decades. ‘‘Demand for space should remain steady, as the economy is stimulated by contractors moving to the area due to the BRAC decision affecting Fort Meade,” the report said.

In the short term, the Baltimore region has 2.5 million square feet of office space under construction, down from 3.4 million square feet at this time last year. Pre-leasing has jumped to 51 percent of space under construction or renovation, up from 34 percent one year ago. Rents increased 0.8 percent, or 3.2 percent at an annualized rate, compared with 2.4 percent in 2006.

In Maryland’s Washington suburbs absorption was flat and vacancy ticked up due to a handful of move-outs during the quarter. After an anemic 2006, when net absorption totaled 542,000 square feet of Class A space, the rate actually turned negative by 160,000 square feet in the first quarter of 2007.

The biggest blow came from federal tenants leaving Montgomery County. The National Institute of Standards and Technology vacated 141,000 square feet in Gaithersburg and the Food and Drug Administration gave up 105,000 square feet in Rockville.

But, the report concluded, ‘‘Overall, conditions are healthy in the Suburban Maryland sub-state area and show signs of promise of things to come.” For example, 41 percent of space under construction or renovation is pre-leased, compared with 38 percent one year ago. Rents were also up 0.6 percent in the first quarter.

Clark⁄Banks to build hospital complex


Photo courtesy of Perkins+Will

Johns Hopkins Hospital awarded a $573 million contract to Clark⁄Banks to construct its new clinical facility in Baltimore.

The 1.5-million-square-foot medical building will feature two, connected towers — one for adult cardiovascular and critical care and another for children’s care. Clark⁄Banks is a joint venture of Clark Construction Group LLC of Bethesda and Banks Contracting Co. Inc. of Baltimore.

The project, the largest health care project under construction in the nation, according to information from Clark Construction, is the new main entrance and centerpiece of a $1.2 billion Johns Hopkins redevelopment plan to increase research and clinical space and replace outdated hospital buildings with advanced facilities.

Located in the heart of Baltimore, at the northwest corner of Orleans and Wolfe streets, the new building is to connect with the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building and the Nelson⁄Harvey Tower to form a state-of-the-art health care complex with 560 beds. Construction on the project has begun and it is to be completed in 2010.
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Old April 6th, 2007, 03:36 PM   #2649
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Downtown deal leaves business owner out
Jean Marbella
Originally published Apr 6, 2007

Jean Marbella

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Downtown deal leaves businessman out






When Nam Koo decided to buy and convert an old downtown movie theater into a clothing warehouse, fellow Korean-American businessmen told him for that kind of investment, he should locate elsewhere.

"Downtown is not good," he recalls them saying. "But I had some kind of feeling, one day this will be good."

He may be right, but he may also not be around to enjoy it.

Koo is the odd man out in an agreement signed last week between the city and the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation that finally should propel the long-stalled "superblock" redevelopment forward. The city and the foundation will swap parcels of land in the old west-side retail district, giving Weinberg development rights to the block bound by Lexington, Howard, Clay and Park.

The problem - from Koo's standpoint, at least - is that some of the land the city traded to the Weinberg Foundation actually belongs to Koo.

At least it does for now. The city is trying to buy him out, but should that fail, it will condemn and seize his property - the former New Theatre that houses a warehouse for Koo's chain of clothing stores on the second floor, and one of his stores, New York Fashions, on the street level. The Weinberg Foundation plans to raze the building and erect a new tower with shops, a parking garage and offices or apartments or both.

On a recent day, it seemed oddly quiet in the upstairs warehouse, given the bustle of shoppers and lunchtime strollers down below on Lexington Street. Boxes of apparel, a tangle of clothing racks, and office equipment are spread through the cavernous room, one end of which retains the raked floor of the former movie theater balcony. Koo's son, Linn, had just returned from a buying trip in Los Angeles, and the two were still trying to digest the news that the city had turned their property over to Weinberg, the powerful nonprofit that owns about 60 percent of the superblock.

The city and the foundation had been feuding for months - Weinberg refused to sell its superblock properties, effectively putting the area's redevelopment on hold, and the city was moving toward condemning its buildings. But suddenly, the two sides were all smiles at a City Hall press conference, announcing the land swap and the turning over of part of the superblock to the foundation for development.

"The person with development rights was supposed to be condemned along with us," Linn Koo says. "It's very upsetting. They should treat every business fairly and appropriately, and I don't think they've done either."

You may not have been to the west side lately - it's been a long time since this was the place to shop downtown, and much of it shows its age: some stores are boarded up or vacant, some of the historic buildings have been abused or neglected over the years and there's a decidedly downmarket air over much of it. And yet, it's as broken in and comfortable as an old shoe - people can pick up a T-shirt or a household knickknack without fear of sticker shock or haughty sales clerks.

But change is, literally, just around the corner. Several stylish apartment and retail buildings like the Atrium and Centerpoint have opened in recent years, and Starbucks has gained a toehold. Can a Panera and a Barnes & Noble be far behind; are local merchants and their customers going to be pushed aside in favor of the same franchises you see everywhere else catering to a trendier set?

That would be a shame - so much of the retail experience these days is mass-marketed ersatz. The other day, I grabbed lunch from a Salvadoran vendor at the nearby Lexington Market, then stopped at the Centerpoint's Starbucks to find a glossed-up Latin American theme playing out, with posters advertising their dulce de leche lattes and one of those Putumayo-type CDs playing on the sound system.

M.J. "Jay" Brodie, the president of the Baltimore Development Corp., the city's economic development arm, says that a redeveloped west side would have room for both national chains and independent stores such as those owned by Koo. It doesn't, however, call for a warehouse, and the city has identified seven or eight possible locations where he might relocate that part of his operation. Brodie is planning to meet with Koo soon to present an offer to buy his property - he wouldn't reveal the figure - and, if it's rejected, will proceed toward condemnation.

"Mr. Koo is the kind of merchant we want to keep," Brodie said. "The problem is where he is located. His property is part of the assemblage of our agreement with Weinberg."

Koo's lawyer, John C. Murphy, said he anticipates a battle over the city's efforts to acquire the property. "The city just sort of assumed the Weinberg development would be better than retaining the Koos," Murphy said. "It's a real value judgment, and I question that. They're not a beeper store."

For the Koos, the past nine years - ever since the city first started talking about seizing west side property for redevelopment - have been "agony," Linn says. Several times, the city has told Koo that he has to leave to make way for redevelopment, only to have the plans stall each time. Meanwhile, they've had to put on hold any improvement or expansion plans - such as for an online venture - not knowing if or when they would have to move.

"I feel like someone is pulling me by the nose," Nam Koo says. "I have to go this way, I have to go that way."



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Old April 6th, 2007, 03:37 PM   #2650
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Jolivet to appeal ruling in superblock lawsuit
By Lorraine Mirabella
Sun reporter
Originally published April 6, 2007
A day after a Baltimore Circuit Court judge dismissed his lawsuit against the city, the head of a minority contractors association said yesterday that he plans to push on with his challenge of the city's land sale to a developer for the superblock project on Baltimore's west side.

Arnold M. Jolivet, who filed a lawsuit in January after the city approved the sale of 37 properties to Lexington Square Partners LLC for $21.6 million, argued that the demolition and environmental work agreed to as part of the agreement should have been subject to competitive bid. Under the sales agreement, Lexington Square, formed by the Chera/Dawson Group, can deduct up to $10 million from the purchase price for the cost of demolition, environmental cleanup and streetscape work.

The Jolivet lawsuit argued the city cannot use a land-disposition agreement to essentially give a $10 million contract to the developer.

"Our contention is the city doesn't have a right to award those types of construction work to developers through land purchase agreements," Jolivet said. "The city must competitively bid this and these types of work."

Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan dismissed the lawsuit after a hearing Wednesday. Jolivet, president of the American Minority Contractors and Businesses Association, who said he filed suit as a resident and taxpayer of the city, said he would appeal the decision.

City Solicitor George A. Nilson said yesterday that the judge's decision clears one more obstacle to moving ahead with the long-stalled project to inject new residents, shops and businesses in the deteriorating stretch of the west side, viewed as critical to revitalizing the former retail hub of downtown.

Lexington Square, which filed preliminary plans with Baltimore Development Corp. Friday, plans to build 400 to 500 market-rate apartments, 200,000 square feet of retail space and parking.

"It's the elimination of an obstacle and another item ... in fresh progress on the west side," Nilson said. "A lot of folks have been frustrated in what they view as the slow pace of things."

Lexington Square was selected as developer in 2004. But the city hit snags in acquiring the property, in part because of a dispute over properties owned by the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation.

Last week, the city, Weinberg Foundation and Lexington Square officials agreed to a land swap to resolve the land dispute and enable the foundation and Baltimore-based developer Cordish Co. to proceed with redeveloping a block on the north side of Lexington Street.

The city still faced challenges in three separate lawsuits, including Jolivet's.

"From our point of view, this is one down, two to go," Nilson said. "We're not anticipating that either of those lawsuits will slow down the new resurgent progress of the west side."

The other lawsuits include one from several owners of property south of Lexington Street, challenging the validity of BDC's selection of the Chera/Dawson Group during a closed meeting in 2004.

Another lawsuit against the BDC was filed by companies controlled by Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos and developer David Hillman. That suit also asks that the city's deal with Chera/Dawson be declared illegal because the agreement improperly included a key parcel not listed in the original bid package and inappropriately allows the developer to deduct nearly half of the $21.6 million purchase price for expenses such as demolition and environmental remediation.



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Old April 6th, 2007, 03:40 PM   #2651
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BACVA report offers hope for convention business
JEN DEGREGORIO
Daily Record Business Writer
April 6, 2007
The Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association has booked more hotel rooms so far this fiscal year than it did by the corresponding time last year, a fact tourism officials say offers hope for the city’s convention business.

BACVA said Thursday it has booked 299,070 hotel-room nights through the end of the third quarter of this fiscal year, which ends June 30. That is 6 percent more than the 282,142 room nights BACVA reserved during the corresponding period last fiscal year.

The news follows a dismal BACVA report last month projecting declining convention business. The group announced in February that it had booked only 10 groups for meetings in 2008 and nine groups for 2009. That is down from 28 groups in 2005.

But the BACVA marketing team expects to book 360,000 room nights by the end of June. Most of those bookings are for conventions scheduled for 2010 or later, said Thomas J. Noonan, BACVA’s chief executive officer.

“The future looks a little brighter,” he said.

The poor convention forecast for 2008 and 2009 is likely the result of internal problems BACVA experienced four years ago, said Robert W. Curran, vice president of the City Council. In 2003, BACVA fired its executive director after discrepancies in the group’s data became public.

“They needed a change of leadership and an infusion of energy,” Curran said. “I feel confident that … Noonan and his team will be able to market Baltimore down the road.”

Planners of large conventions tend to book their meetings five years or more in advance, Noonan said. With a 757-room Hilton hotel planned to open next year beside the convention center, Noonan said he expects even more business from convention planners seeking large room blocks and direct access to the convention center.

The Hilton Convention Center Hotel has already lured two major conventions: the Orthopaedic Trauma Association, booked for 2010, and the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, booked for 2011.

“A lot of groups were waiting to make their decisions on Baltimore because they were waiting to see if the hotel would get done,” Noonan said.

Noonan expects to reconcile convention shortfalls in 2008 and 2009 by targeting short-term planners, such as medical and pharmaceutical companies, which are known to schedule meetings only a year or two in advance.
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Old April 6th, 2007, 03:42 PM   #2652
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The View from the Middle
MAXIMILIAN FRANZ
Daily Record Photographer
April 6, 2007
City-dwellers and tourists walk Baltimore’s Inner Harbor and see the World Trade Center stretching up to the sky above. They look down from the building’s observation deck and see the orange-bricked city stretching out to the horizon below.

But, in the middle is a view not many see. Between the street-level shops and the “Top of the World” perch is the perspective of an office worker in the Baltimore landmark. The Daily Record offers its readers that view on a recent cloudy afternoon.
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Old April 6th, 2007, 05:41 PM   #2653
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StevenW View Post
BACVA report offers hope for convention business
JEN DEGREGORIO
Daily Record Business Writer
April 6, 2007
The Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association has booked more hotel rooms so far this fiscal year than it did by the corresponding time last year, a fact tourism officials say offers hope for the city’s convention business.

BACVA said Thursday it has booked 299,070 hotel-room nights through the end of the third quarter of this fiscal year, which ends June 30. That is 6 percent more than the 282,142 room nights BACVA reserved during the corresponding period last fiscal year.

The news follows a dismal BACVA report last month projecting declining convention business. The group announced in February that it had booked only 10 groups for meetings in 2008 and nine groups for 2009. That is down from 28 groups in 2005.

But the BACVA marketing team expects to book 360,000 room nights by the end of June. Most of those bookings are for conventions scheduled for 2010 or later, said Thomas J. Noonan, BACVA’s chief executive officer.

“The future looks a little brighter,” he said.

The poor convention forecast for 2008 and 2009 is likely the result of internal problems BACVA experienced four years ago, said Robert W. Curran, vice president of the City Council. In 2003, BACVA fired its executive director after discrepancies in the group’s data became public.

“They needed a change of leadership and an infusion of energy,” Curran said. “I feel confident that … Noonan and his team will be able to market Baltimore down the road.”
i really don't buy into what the media and critics say about baltimore's supposedly "lack" of convention business. i think that in the long run, we'll be just fine. this hotel's gonna' do us more good than we think.
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Old April 6th, 2007, 06:22 PM   #2654
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i really don't buy into what the media and critics say about baltimore's supposedly "lack" of convention business. i think that in the long run, we'll be just fine. this hotel's gonna' do us more good than we think.
Probably right. Baltimore's convention center will never be the largest, but it's among the easiest to get to, get around, and walk to places from.
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Old April 7th, 2007, 01:04 AM   #2655
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Broadway Market May Get Funky New Look
Friday, April 06, 2007
WBAL Radio as reported by Angela Jackson






Plans are in the works to redevelop a portion of one of Baltimore City's oldest municipal markets.

Changes to the north shed of the Broadway Market in Fells Point are still in the preliminary stages, but the president of the Fells Point Development Association hopes a new look will enhance existing businesses and attract new ones to take over vacant spots.

Jeremy Fennema said the time has come to update the area because the market is too important for the city and state to die.

"We think it strengthens the economy for Maryland, we think it strengthens the economy for Baltimore and it provides something that people can't get anywhere else," he said. "You can go across the country and get products from a Safeway, but you can't go across the country and get the experience that you get by going to the Broadway Market."

The 600 block of Broadway near the market is also looking to undergo changes, as well as a number of properties along the 1600 block of Fleet Street are slated to be demolished to make way for a parking garage.

Elizabeth Para of Sophia's Place is concerned that the changes will force her family's 22-year-old deli business away. Para says increased competition and changes to parking might force long-standing customers to go elsewhere.

"I think the plans could be good for business because a redevelopment of the area would make it look nicer and attract new customers, however I'm worried that we're not going to be here to benefit from those changes," she said. I'd like to know a little bit more about what's going to happen to us when those plans go through."

She said she has heard the market will resemble The Avenue in White Marsh or the Hunt Valley Towne Centre.

Fennema expects opposition from historians, the community and businesses. He said what he calls visioning sessions will take place with the city council, historic preservationists and other groups to go over the planned changes. He said changes to the area may take several years.

Fennema added that although he is a native of Chicago, he fully understands and appreciates Baltimoreans' passion for municipal markets.
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Old April 7th, 2007, 03:28 AM   #2656
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While the renderings do make Broadway look like some planned suburban town center, I am pretty confident that it won't turn out that way. The developers only have control over so much of the property and I would imagine it'd be pretty hard to make two hundred years old buildings, or however old they are, look as new as those renderings make them appear. No matter how gentrified Fells Point and the other waterfront neighborhoods become, they'll never be entirely clean of their history as seedy port towns.
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Old April 7th, 2007, 03:56 AM   #2657
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You're right Peter, it's really only the two blocks facing Broadway between Fleet and Aliceanna. That's only a small fraction of Fells Point commercial. Ma and Pa will still be the majority. This will give the neighborhood some larger footprint locations to bring in lacking services in a neighborhood on a block that was difficult to otherwise revitalize.

Nate
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Old April 7th, 2007, 04:33 AM   #2658
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Originally Posted by jamie_hunt View Post
Have family in Bethesda, Rockville, and Gaithersburg, and friends in Silver Spring, so have always referred to them by name individually or collectively as Montgomery County.

SS--not that I'm doubting you or anything, but do you have a source for those density/size comparisons?
Here ya go,

Silver Spring (CBD) 15,600 (2004)

City of Baltimore 8,058.4 (2000)

District of Columbia 9,378.0 (2000). This number changes slightly depending on choosing Washington (City) or the District. I chose the higher number.


Pennster pretty much summed it up; and his number for Silver Spring is probably more accurate since the data is from 2004. We have added around 1000 residential units since then. There are over 6,000 residential units planned, under construction or completed in the last 3 years.

These sources are pretty much as credible as they get from what I know and I don't doubt the Silver Spring numbers. The way the grocery stores are always packed, the 20,000+ people that come to the annual Jazz Festival, the fact that the CBD is about two and ahalf square miles, there are simply a lot more people here than most people would/want to believe. Take into account the census data that says 80,000 people live in around the immediate area of downtown and it does not seem farfetched to say that around 35,000 of them live in the CBD.
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Old April 7th, 2007, 04:59 AM   #2659
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I agree. Maryland suburbs is way too vague. I mean, are we talking about the Baltimore suburbs or the DC suburbs?? There has to be a better way to define that area and it's not just MoCo so we can't just call it that. It includes PG, HoCo and others. There has to be a better way to refer to that region than just Maryland suburbs. In the case of Virginia, Northern Virginia works well. Can't we come up with something for Maryland that describes that region? I hate it when I'm talking to people out of state and trying to describe to them how the DC metro area is and what it includes. It's always either "parts of Maryland" or naming individual counties and/or cities.
Finally…someone who understands where I’m coming from without being vain.

Suburban Maryland is simply a dumb name that could be applied to 95% of the state. It is just too vague, how does that define us at all? No one from here tells people that they’re from “Suburban Maryland”, it is unexceptional and sends the wrong message. I much prefer National Capital region as designated by state for Montgomery, Prince George’s and Frederick counties.

I blame our lousy leaders that lack any sense of marketing/branding and the ridiculous fragmented mentality of people in our state as evidenced on this board. I have relatives that live in Baltimore and have lived all over the state.

We fail to understand that we’re all in this together and what happens to one jurisdiction reflects upon the whole state. No one in Europe cares what region you’re in they see us all as one state – “Murdaland”.

There should also be a definitive name for the Biotech corridors in, around and between Baltimore and Montgomery linking the two with marketing and branding. They are both growing tremendously and it would be a shame if they continued to see each other as competition. The new State Biotechnology advisory board is a good step and should make a branding mechanism a first priority.
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Old April 7th, 2007, 05:09 AM   #2660
bmorescottamanda
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What is going on about 10 Inner Harbor? I thought there was going to be news on it over a month ago.
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