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Old January 27th, 2007, 02:16 AM   #281
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i am guessing that the big meeting is/was to keep legg mason downtown. their lease is up in 2008 or 2009 in the tower space they are in.
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Old January 27th, 2007, 03:30 AM   #282
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I'm not sure creating a 30% additional tree canopy is a wise way to spend money nor waste resources. Obviously it would be a nice addition but things like crime and education should be receiving that money.

There aren't too many people who look at Baltimore negatively or don't want to come here because of our tree canopy.
It's not a very costly investment, and can yield returns in the form of better sidewalks and neighborhood spaces -- generating private investment -- as well as the energy efficiency that comes from the shade trees bring. Trees also help control erosion from loose soil, provide nesting places for birds, and improve overall ecology by supporting plant and wildlife within its canope. I used to work for the NYC Parks Dept, which had its own natural resources group. Invasive plant mitigation, birding, and the tree canope were our three big issues -- oh, and making sure that the golf course operators didn't mow down all grassland in public parks.
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Old January 27th, 2007, 03:32 AM   #283
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Originally Posted by Gsol View Post
My point was not to sepeculate on which firm is coming, going or expanding/relocating. The upshot here is if any journalist is curious enough to resolve this mystery. These writers know the "go to" people and/or the principals. Even if no one will talk, the writer can coyly ask, for example, "Is a major company locating to Baltimre?". Then read the body language. No one has to say a word. Just place the right questions and look at the eyes and face especially.

If this were a national story or an epic one, you best believe the press would be all over it.

If there is a big story here, someone will break it. I only wish it could be me.
These things get leaked eventually, but it's important from the negotiation's standpoint to keep things on the down low. Some things are best not hyped.
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Old January 27th, 2007, 04:14 AM   #284
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I am not confident the BDC is following the law and I don't like secrets, again, where public money may be involved. Period.

Nate
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Old January 27th, 2007, 04:29 AM   #285
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Originally Posted by baltimoreisbest View Post
It's not a very costly investment, and can yield returns in the form of better sidewalks and neighborhood spaces -- generating private investment -- as well as the energy efficiency that comes from the shade trees bring. Trees also help control erosion from loose soil, provide nesting places for birds, and improve overall ecology by supporting plant and wildlife within its canope. I used to work for the NYC Parks Dept, which had its own natural resources group. Invasive plant mitigation, birding, and the tree canope were our three big issues -- oh, and making sure that the golf course operators didn't mow down all grassland in public parks.
Tree planting can also reduce health effects like Asthma. This in affect will reduce health care expenses for the state and city as well as keep pressure off the medical services, hospitals and tax payers.
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Old January 27th, 2007, 06:34 AM   #286
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city + green = better place.
City plus green equals better and city plus green also means dead trees. Life in the city is hard on trees. Bad air, salt, auto damage, intense sun, toxic soil and meager moisture mean that unless a city has an active program to keep its trees in good shape, they will go away. Even when they do, there are only a few species of trees that are suitable to growing in little holes in the pavement in a rowhouse neighborhood. Outer city areas like Roland Park don't have a problem, but it's in the dense rowhouse areas that somebody needs to keep track of each tree hole and make sure that there still is a tree there. I'm glad to see that they want to do this.
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Old January 27th, 2007, 06:37 AM   #287
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I was downtown the other day and there seems to be another crane rising at the Convention Center Hotel site. Hopefully it will finally start to rise up from the ground.
In the scheme of things, this building is really speeding along. It seems to have a huge "basement" and they are almost back up to the ground level.
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Old January 27th, 2007, 06:49 AM   #288
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Originally Posted by scando View Post
City plus green equals better and city plus green also means dead trees. Life in the city is hard on trees. Bad air, salt, auto damage, intense sun, toxic soil and meager moisture mean that unless a city has an active program to keep its trees in good shape, they will go away. Even when they do, there are only a few species of trees that are suitable to growing in little holes in the pavement in a rowhouse neighborhood. Outer city areas like Roland Park don't have a problem, but it's in the dense rowhouse areas that somebody needs to keep track of each tree hole and make sure that there still is a tree there. I'm glad to see that they want to do this.
you're absolutely right. i see a lot of trees in sore need of water because of the small hole in the pavement that they're planted in. i'm hoping that part of tomorrow's meeting deals with public education of tree life. my next door neighbor has a 30 foot tall tree growing out of a 1.5 x 1.5 foot hole. if i didn't water it as much as i do, i'm sure it would be dead. it IS showing signs of disease and stress as it is. it's new neighbor and we're probably going to expand its drainage in the sprnig. but it's this kind of education that tree owners need. people need to realize that water doesn't seep through the sidewalk (does anyone know if it seeps through the prototype rubber walks?). but again, you're right. roland park and guilford and moravia and mt washington don't need as much focus. its highlandtown and union square and canton and midtown and pigtown that will benifit from an urban canopy.
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Old January 27th, 2007, 06:51 AM   #289
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Yeah, one of the cited benefits of the rubber sidewalks was that water could seep through, which encourages the roots to grow down, instead of up through the concrete.
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Old January 27th, 2007, 01:22 PM   #290
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A call to act before job influx
New defense workers will strain resources and services, report says
By Timothy B. Wheeler
Sun reporter
Originally published January 27, 2007
Warning to act on BRAC needs



Using some of their frankest language to date, state planners warn in a newly released report that the surge of new workers and their families coming to Maryland because of military base realignment could strain water supplies, snarl traffic and contribute to the region's sprawl.

The report by the Maryland Department of Planning - the most detailed look yet at the impact of the military base shuffle - says state and local officials need to take "significant steps now" to prepare for more than 25,000 new households expected to move to the state over the next eight years as up to 60,000 defense and contractor jobs relocate to Aberdeen Proving Ground, Fort Meade and other facilities.

"We want to be able to accommodate these jobs, but we also want to maintain the quality of life that Marylanders expect," Richard Eberhart Hall, acting secretary of planning, said in an interview yesterday. "Accomplishing both of those is going to be tough."

Growth-management advocates and others have warned that the Pentagon's nationwide military job shuffle could bring problems as well as wealth to Maryland communities. But this 300-page report, which state officials have refused to release for months, represents the first official and most detailed acknowledgement of the extent of the challenges to accommodating the growth.

Michael Hayes, director of military and federal affairs for the state Department of Business and Economic Development, which commissioned the report, has said its release was being held in an effort to get better estimates of the impact.

The report offers no cost estimates, but calls for expediting highway and transit projects and some water system upgrades to avoid traffic and development bottlenecks and preserve rural land in rapidly suburbanizing counties.

The price tag to taxpayers is likely to run into billions of dollars. Anne Arundel County alone is seeking $5 billion in highway widenings and transit upgrades around Fort Meade, though the federal government normally pays the vast majority of the tab on such projects.

The report also urges local officials to begin planning now for extra classroom space to accommodate the base-related growth, and it warns of potential restrictions on sewage plant expansions, which could limit growth around the proving ground and Fort Meade.

Hall, tapped by Gov. Martin O'Malley to be planning secretary, noted that the base-related growth would add to already significant development pressures in much of the Baltimore-Washington region.

"What we don't want to see happen is have growth be deflected," Hall said, where low-density development would consume more farmland and forests.

Harford County faces the greatest growth pressures, says the report. With most workers expected to want to live within a 45-mile commute of their jobs, planners project 6,533 households will settle in the county around APG. As many as 8,200 additional workers are expected at the post, with up to twice that number working for defense contractors and related businesses on or around the 72,000-acre installation.

Families moving to Harford to take base-related jobs could buy up more than two-thirds of the high-quality housing expected to be built or for sale in the county's designated growth area, the plan cautions. But the county's plans to concentrate those new households could be foiled by lack of infrastructure, the report cautions.

Harford and its municipalities face water-supply limits or shortages, the report says. Bel Air's water capacity is inadequate, planners say, and they warn that Aberdeen's plans to solve its looming supply crunch by desalinating Chesapeake Bay water might not get approved and completed before new workers and their families start arriving.

The report says there is "an increased urgency for plans and actions now" to finance and build new water-supply and sewage treatment capacity, highway and transit improvements and classroom space.

"If ... development occurs without this investment," it adds, "the likely consequences are further threats to rural land preservation in the county and/or further deflection of growth outwards to surrounding jurisdictions, specifically Cecil County in Maryland or out of state (Pennsylvania and Delaware)."

A commission appointed 14 months ago by Harford County Executive David R. Craig announced this week that it will unveil an "action plan" Monday for coping with base-related growth.

James C. Richardson, Harford's economic development director, said the county has plans to expand its water and sewage treatment system and is in the process of rewriting its zoning code to address concerns about the housing stock and sprawl. With workers set to begin arriving in two to four years, he noted, "we don't have the luxury of a long lead period here, on any of this stuff."

Neighboring Cecil County, projected to get 1,998 new households from the base realignment, also faces serious development strains because of inadequate water supplies and potential sewage treatment limits, state planners say.

"Cecil County does not currently have sufficient water supply capacity to support projected growth," the report warns. And while the county and towns appear able to handle the sewage from the increased residential growth, the report says there might not be enough capacity if business and industry grow as well.

Some rivers and streams around the proving ground and Fort Meade already are suffering from pollution, the report notes, and efforts to clean them up might require limits on sewage discharges. Those restrictions, required by federal law or by the interstate Chesapeake Bay cleanup compact, could block expansion of some wastewater treatment plants - meaning that base-related growth might be hampered or diverted elsewhere.
As for schools, the report notes that local school officials have yet to factor base-related growth into projections of classroom space needs. Baltimore City and the seven counties likely to be most affected by the base realignment have projected needing $214 million for 165 different projects. But the state doesn't fund all the construction requests of the counties.




Around Fort Meade, the report warns, highway widenings and transit projects in the works will not be enough to handle the growth in traffic expected as a result of jobs being shifted there.

The state Department of Transportation is working on more than 50 highway and transit projects that should help ease traffic snarls around Maryland's military installations, according a list compiled by the agency. Nearly half are under construction, but many of the most expensive upgrades - and some of the most critical - only have money for planning.

As one of his first acts, the incoming governor introduced legislation to create a Cabinet-level group to coordinate state planning for the base realignment. O'Malley tapped Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown to lead the interagency group.

"These are tremendous challenges, but also tremendous opportunities," Brown said in a statement issued by a spokeswoman. "This will be a highly educated work force that will help Maryland play an important role in the security of our country."

The Baltimore Metropolitan Council, a regional planning group, aims to narrow down the list of priority transportation projects in the next 60 days so local and state officials can accelerate their construction, said a spokeswoman for the council.

John R. Leopold, Anne Arundel's new executive, has asked O'Malley to expedite work on one Fort Meade project - a $270 million widening of Route 175 from Route 170 to the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. The county has more than $5 billion in highway and transit projects on its priority list, said Bob Leib, an aide to the county executive, including extension of the Washington Metro's Green Line to Fort Meade, which could cost about $3 billion.

"The challenge is to try to make sure that folks are as ready as they can be when they [base workers] start coming," said Hall, the acting state planning secretary.

Del. Mary Ann Love, chairwoman of the Anne Arundel delegation, said she was confident that the county wouldn't be suffocated by the fast growth.

"We've had ... meetings for the last two, three years, so we've been working on it," she said. "I have faith in it. The beginning years will be all right."



[email protected]
Sun reporter Justin Fenton contributed to this article.
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Old January 27th, 2007, 03:06 PM   #291
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Baltimore Business journal

Ed Hale looking for a specialty supermarket(similar to Fresh Fields) for his Canton Crossing complex. Also, he wants to add a department store similar to Filene's basement opening next to Best Buy. A new office building and retail seems to be his next project for Canton Crossing.

Real Estate experts think he has a very good shot at landing some nice retail on his waterfront location.
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Old January 27th, 2007, 03:19 PM   #292
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StevenW View Post
A call to act before job influx
New defense workers will strain resources and services, report says
By Timothy B. Wheeler
Sun reporter
Originally published January 27, 2007
Warning to act on BRAC needs

John R. Leopold, Anne Arundel's new executive, has asked O'Malley to expedite work on one Fort Meade project - a $270 million widening of Route 175 from Route 170 to the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. The county has more than $5 billion in highway and transit projects on its priority list, said Bob Leib, an aide to the county executive, including extension of the Washington Metro's Green Line to Fort Meade, which could cost about $3 billion.


[email protected]
Sun reporter Justin Fenton contributed to this article.
Excellent article I especially like this line "$5 billion in highway and transit projects on its priority list, said Bob Leib, an aide to the county executive, including extension of the Washington Metro's Green Line to Fort Meade, which could cost about $3 billion. ".

Could Maryland officials actually be on the ball with this whole BRAC thing? They seem very bullish about the economic growth potential surprisingly. The media coverage has been good and putting Lt. Gov Brown in the mix gives it even more importance.
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Old January 27th, 2007, 05:09 PM   #293
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fanofterps View Post
Ed Hale looking for a specialty supermarket(similar to Fresh Fields) for his Canton Crossing complex. Also, he wants to add a department store similar to Filene's basement opening next to Best Buy. A new office building and retail seems to be his next project for Canton Crossing.

Real Estate experts think he has a very good shot at landing some nice retail on his waterfront location.

I'd love to read the full article if anyone has [email protected]?!?!?
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Old January 27th, 2007, 05:26 PM   #294
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quabex View Post
you're absolutely right. i see a lot of trees in sore need of water because of the small hole in the pavement that they're planted in. i'm hoping that part of tomorrow's meeting deals with public education of tree life. my next door neighbor has a 30 foot tall tree growing out of a 1.5 x 1.5 foot hole. if i didn't water it as much as i do, i'm sure it would be dead. it IS showing signs of disease and stress as it is. it's new neighbor and we're probably going to expand its drainage in the sprnig. but it's this kind of education that tree owners need. people need to realize that water doesn't seep through the sidewalk (does anyone know if it seeps through the prototype rubber walks?). but again, you're right. roland park and guilford and moravia and mt washington don't need as much focus. its highlandtown and union square and canton and midtown and pigtown that will benifit from an urban canopy.
I like this conversation about the tree canopy. I think we're all in agreement here. However, Roland Park and Guilford could use some attention too. I have lived in Guilford for 2.5 years. I can't tell you how many dead trees I have seen cut down in this time period. I myself have lost a Norway maple and will probably lose a sugar maple in the next couple of years. The guy who took down my Norway said that Guilford is startin to push 100 years old. Thats a long time for urban trees. The city planted a whole bunch of trees along the streets last year. Part of the agreement was that if they planted one in front of your house you had to agree to water it. They provided people with "aligator bags" to hold water around the trees. I think it has been pretty successful, although there are some people who didn't live up to their commitment and let their trees die.
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Old January 27th, 2007, 06:03 PM   #295
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Yes, individual responsibility is key to just about every formula for success.
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Old January 28th, 2007, 12:09 AM   #296
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^Norway Maples are invasive, so the City doesn't like them anyway.

Nate
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Old January 28th, 2007, 03:09 AM   #297
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In the scheme of things, this building is really speeding along. It seems to have a huge "basement" and they are almost back up to the ground level.
My company hosted its annual fundraising gala on Friday and is co-sponsoring the baseball memorabila show at the convention this weekend. I really got a good look at the Zenith and the new Hilton. I really wish the Zenith was 25-30 floors higher. Baltimore needs more buildings that arent brick and mortor. That building is done such a disservice at its current height. The footprint of the new Hilton is HUGE. They've been making plenty of progress. The foundation work is done and columns are starting to go up. I really hope it looks better than the renderings once its built.
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Old January 28th, 2007, 03:13 AM   #298
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Originally Posted by sdeclue View Post
I'm not sure creating a 30% additional tree canopy is a wise way to spend money nor waste resources. Obviously it would be a nice addition but things like crime and education should be receiving that money.

There aren't too many people who look at Baltimore negatively or don't want to come here because of our tree canopy.
Thats really short-sighted.
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Old January 28th, 2007, 08:37 AM   #299
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^Norway Maples are invasive, so the City doesn't like them anyway.

Nate
It's really hard to find trees that DO work for dense areas. Norway Maples are invasive but they are also hardy survivors. American Elms are mainly gone, Bradford Pears are hardy but easily broken and Red Maples are pretty good but have surface root problems. Most native species of oaks, hickories, tuliptrees, sycamores, etc are too large and vulnerable to bad air. Pines break down. No wonder these poor things have problems. We are left with mainly artificial trees such as Lindens, Ginkos,a couple Chinese hybrids, and even those require some pampering. One of the things I wish they would do is refrain from planting trees in the strip between sidewalks and the street. It is inevitable that these trees push up sidewalks and get broken by parking trucks. Baltimore used to have a tree tsar (one of them was Walter Orlinsky). It would be nice to see one again. This is a life quality issue that affects people's outlook on life, air quality, tolerable summer heat, etc.
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Old January 28th, 2007, 08:45 AM   #300
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My company hosted its annual fundraising gala on Friday and is co-sponsoring the baseball memorabila show at the convention this weekend. I really got a good look at the Zenith and the new Hilton. I really wish the Zenith was 25-30 floors higher. Baltimore needs more buildings that arent brick and mortor. That building is done such a disservice at its current height. The footprint of the new Hilton is HUGE. They've been making plenty of progress. The foundation work is done and columns are starting to go up. I really hope it looks better than the renderings once its built.
The height of the Zenith was limited by the FAA because of helicopter flights to and from MIEMS. I'm amazed at how large and fast the Hilton project is. They seemed to start digging before the ink was dry on the bond issue that is funding it and have been moving pretty quickly. Since it's subject to the same height limits as the Zenith I guess it had to have a large footprint. Since it's a done deal, I think I am starting to look at the renderings and think that it will look OK after all.
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