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Old January 30th, 2007, 02:19 AM   #341
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I wonder what the given incentives or conditions were for the firm to choose Baltimore over Northern Virginia?

Cel-Sci partners with developer to build $15M plant

Washington Business Journal - January 26, 2007

by Vandana Sinha
Staff Reporter


Cel-Sci plans to build a $15 million manufacturing plant in Maryland to produce its first cancer drug, which after 24 years is heading into final testing.

The Virginia biotech is partnering with developer BioProperties to build a 30,000-square-foot plant in Baltimore, near other Cel-Sci operations. Set to open next summer, the plant will be used to produce Cel-Sci's complicated blend of cytokines, or immune system proteins, that make up its lead drug Multikine.


Cel-Sci plans to start enrolling 800 patients worldwide for its final, and most extensive, tests of Multikine. The drug kills infected cells within a certain radius of a head or neck tumor to prevent its re-growth, and the company hopes to prove its claim that it hikes a patient's overall survival rate by 10 percent after three years.

"This will make or break the company," says William Prather, a research analyst for Dutton Associates, a California equity research firm that owns no Cel-Sci shares. "It is good they got approval. That was a long time coming."

Cel-Sci has seen its dark days, including two delistings from the American Stock Exchange, mass layoffs and, most recently, $420,000 in unanticipated expenses to restate financial results after a regulatory rule change.

The Food and Drug Administration also took two years to give Cel-Sci the go-ahead for Phase III studies, time Cel-Sci says it used to continue testing its phase II volunteers. After more than three years, the company found a 33 percent improvement in their survival rates -- a stat that it hopes serves them well as it aims to raise $25 million in a secondary offering by next summer.

After getting more cash, the 19-employee company plans to almost double its size.

"You can probably call this the most conservative management team in this business because we have worked through the valley of death many times," says Geert Kersten, CEO of Cel-Sci and stepson of its founder and president, Maximilian de Clara. "This is a study we need to successfully complete."

But they haven't quite cleared the valley yet. With $7 million of cash on hand, Cel-Sci says that will last them just under two years. Its share price, meanwhile, has remained under $1 for eight months, peaking in the last year at $1.78.

Prather expects those shares to reach $1 by September. In a recent report, he describes Multikine as an early, and largely undisputed, cancer drug entrant with the potential to bring in $1.25 billion as long as it snags 10 percent of the total market.

"Cel-Sci currently has essentially the entire worldwide right to Multikine, a phenomenon not often seen with other oncology-focused companies," Prather wrote in an October 2006 research report. "Acceptance of the product should be fairly rapid as we believe Multikine is fulfilling an unmet need, there is currently no competition and patients have significant potential upside with little to no downside risk."

But, Prather warns, there is still considerable risk of a market snub, thanks to unsuccessful predecessors.


"They're at a little bit of a disadvantage because cytokines, and immune therapies in general, have not met expectations in the past," Prather says. "There is some skepticism to any company involved in that technology."

If its late-stage trials start hinting at success, though, Kersten believes that skepticism could quickly transform into buy-in -- literally. Add in future uses of Multikine for other forms of cancer, as well as an avian flu treatment now under development, Kersten says and Prather agrees that Cel-Sci could attract acquirers in a few years.

"The closer you are to the finish line, the more people are interested," says Kersten, who owns 7.3 percent of the company. "Suddenly they'll be coming in with big fat checks, and we will have that option."

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Old January 30th, 2007, 03:41 AM   #342
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Quote:
Originally Posted by getontrac View Post
The McDonald's at Pulaski Highway and Highland Ave has apparently been demolished (at least it appeared to be from my night time view from the #22), if any body gives a hoot and hollar.

Wonder what garbage they'll put in it's place.

Nate
there is alot of mcdonalds that are getting overhauled torn down and rebuilt from scratch. there are 2 more that i know of that are currently bein redone.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 03:59 AM   #343
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Brexton for sale again

Brexton for sale again
$1.25M price set for building
JEN DEGREGORIO
Daily Record Business Writer
January 29, 2007 6:53 PM
Plans to rehabilitate Baltimore’s historic Brexton building have fallen through, putting the 19th century former hotel back on the real estate market.

Owner and developer Park Avenue LLC failed to execute ambitious plans to convert 868 Park Ave. into upscale condominiums, a project proposed in late 2005 to the city planning department. The castle-like, triangular-shaped building in Baltimore’s Mount Vernon neighborhood is now for sale for $1.25 million.

The property has drawn tremendous interest, said Antony Gross, the broker with Coldwell Banker Commercial NRT who is marketing the building. Four formal offers have been made to purchase the Brexton, one of which the owner is now considering, according to Gross.

“We’ve shown it 30 times,” Gross said.

It is unclear why the developer did not follow through with the building’s renovation. Stephen Mowbray, a managing member of Park Avenue LLC, declined to comment.

“He just realized that this is a bigger project than what he is prepared to do right now,” Gross said.

The city housing department is likely one reason why the Brexton is for sale. The department took Park Avenue LLC to court last year because the building was in violation of city housing codes and considered “unfit for human habitation,” said David Tillman, a spokesman for the housing department. The court ruled that Park Avenue LLC would have to bring the building to code or sell it by late 2006, Tillman said.

“We told him we were going to hold his feet to the fire,” Tillman said.

A little more than a year ago, representatives from Park Avenue LLC expressed confidence in the Brexton renovation, praising the building’s unique character and location to the city’s Commission on Historical and Architectural Preservation.

“It's the cultural district,” Mowbray told The Daily Record in December 2005. “The Inner Harbor has fabulous views and more amenities for the younger set, but Mount Vernon has all of the cultural attractions.”

But Mowbray and his partners did have their doubts. John Simpson, Park Avenue LLC’s project manager, called the Brexton renovation a “risk.” The building, vacant since the late 1980s, was in serious disrepair and therefore expensive to renovate. Its strange shape further complicated matters. While the building has an imposing presence on Park Avenue, it only comprises about 12,100 square feet of space. A lack of on-site parking is another issue.

Investors overlooked those problems, convinced the building’s distinctiveness would prevail. Formerly a residential hotel, the Brexton housed Wallis Warfield Simpson, Duchess of Windsor, when she lived in Baltimore. The Brexton’s grand architecture, with its two framing turrets, makes the building instantly memorable.

Park Avenue LLC was not the first to think they could make the Brexton work. A cadre of developers have tried and failed to renovate the building over the years, proposing options ranging from a bed-and-breakfast to a dance club.

“It’s a real tough property,” said R. Paul Warren, vice president of the Mount Vernon Belvedere Association. “It looks huge and wonderful, but it’s almost all façade.”

Warren said Mount Vernon residents love the Brexton and want to see it resurrected to its former glory. But they realize the task calls for a “creative approach,” such as leveraging tax credits or other public funds.

“It’s a real money pit,” he said. “It’s going to take all the help it can get.”
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Old January 30th, 2007, 04:38 AM   #344
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Two reasons why the Hilton won approval over the other designs - Race and politics. In this case, they both mean the same thing.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 05:23 AM   #345
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That is absolutely true k25150. Sad state of affairs isn't it?
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Old January 30th, 2007, 05:28 AM   #346
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I wonder if this might be the major corporate announcement that has been rumored. If so, it sounds like good news, Hohn-Saric and Becker are locals with roots in this area, I once met them when they answered their own office door -

Sylvan spinoff Educate to go private
$535 million deal comes on heels of similar move by sister firm Laureate
By Hanah Cho
Sun Reporter
Originally published January 29, 2007, 10:37 AM EST
Educate Inc., the Baltimore-based company best known for its Sylvan tutoring centers, said today that it will be acquired by its management and other investors and become a private company for $8 per share.

Including assumed debt, Educate's transaction is worth $535 million, the company said.

The deal comes on the heels of its sister company, Laureate Education Inc., announcing last night that it agreed to be bought by a group led by its chief executive officer, Douglas L. Becker, in a cash deal worth $3.8 billion.

Laureate Education and Educate were born through a complicated breakup of Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. In 2003, Sylvan sold its pre-kindergarten-through-12th grade tutoring business to focus on higher education and became Laureate Education, which is also based in Baltimore.

The tutoring business, consisting of Sylvan tutoring centers and supplemental education services, was sold to investment fund Apollo Management LP and became Educate. Apollo Management is Educate's largest shareholder with nearly 53 percent of its stock.

The company said today Apollo has agreed to vote its shares in favor of the transaction.

The $8 per share purchase price represents a 5 percent premium over the closing stock price of $7.61 on Friday. In September, when Educate announced that it received the buyout proposal, the purchase price was a 13 percent premium. The company has 43 million outstanding shares.

The buyout offer came from Chairman and Chief Executive Officer R. Christopher Hoehn-Saric; President and Chief Operating Officer Peter J. Cohen; Christopher J. Paucek, president of Educate Products; and Sterling Capital Partners. Also, some partners and co-investors of Sterling, including Citigroup Private Equity, are part of the group that made the buyout proposal.

Investors of Laureate's transaction also include Citigroup Private Equity and Sterling Capital.

Sterling Capital Partners is the buyout arm of Baltimore-based private equity group Sterling Partners. Hoehn-Saric and Becker co-founded Sterling Partners.

Educate has more than 1,000 franchise and corporate-owned centers across the country. The company has about 2,300 full-time employees and 6,450 part-time workers.

The deal, expected to close in the second quarter, requires shareholder and regulatory approval.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 05:49 AM   #347
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Yeah, very encouraging news.

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Old January 30th, 2007, 06:13 AM   #348
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Baltimore residents want to double city’s trees

http://www.examiner.com/a-534519~Bal...y_s_trees.html
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Old January 30th, 2007, 07:29 AM   #349
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I have a close friend who just got a job at SmithBarney in Baltimore, so I'll keep you posted on what happens with their real estate situation...
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Old January 30th, 2007, 01:12 PM   #350
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Downtown jobs, housing boom

Studies of growth patterns in Baltimore indicate a vigorous jump in the center city over next 5 years

By Lorraine Mirabella
Sun reporter
Originally published January 30, 2007

Downtown Baltimore is poised for a substantial housing and job growth spurt over the next five years that could solidify its emergence as an urban hub where people live, work and shop, according to a forward-looking series of reports by the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore.

In the next six years, downtown can absorb more than 7,400 new housing units and will pick up more than 17,000 jobs, thanks to hospital expansions, biopark development and the federal military-base restructuring, the partnership's Outlook 2012 estimates.

Still, the reports raise questions about whether that degree of residential growth will actually happen - and how many new downtown residents would stay long term - because of concerns ranging from crime to pollution to high parking costs.

The partnership commissioned the studies last year, with support from the Goldseker Foundation, in part to back up with numbers the changes that many have seen in downtown. As recently as five years ago, few people lived in the central business district, but now new residents can be seen jogging, walking dogs and even grocery shopping at the area's first new supermarket.

The center-city population has doubled to 10,000 in five years. And more than 37,000 people live within a one-mile radius of Pratt and Light streets, ranking downtown's core eighth in the nation for population density and number of households earning $75,000 a year or more, according to the report.

"It gives specific, updated information to what people suspected was going on but couldn't demonstrate," said Timothy D. Armbruster, president and chief executive of the Goldseker Foundation. "The ... population of center city may very well at least double in the next five years. The potential for this to turn into a real community, and - if the population does grow - a really substantial civic and political influence, is something people should understand."

New downtown residents are predominantly young, white and highly educated, with household incomes of $50,000 or more, the report found. Nearly three of every four come from out of state.

"The new residents are fairly different than what the Census shows for Baltimore City, but the downtown area is much different from other areas of Baltimore City," said Matthew Kachura, a research analyst for the Jacob France Institute at the University of Baltimore, which surveyed 470 new downtown residents.

But keeping those new residents downtown could be a challenge, the report suggests. New residents surveyed listed crime and drugs, dirt and pollution, lack of parking or expensive parking as negatives in living downtown. A third of those surveyed expect to move within five years, and more than a third were unsure of their future plans. Just over a quarter said they intended to stay for five years or more.

"What this is saying is there are significant drivers from the major institutions expanding, so there will be a lot more jobs downtown and the potential then for continued strong downtown housing market," said John McIlwain, a senior resident fellow for housing at the Washington-based Urban Land Institute.

But McIlwain said he wouldn't anticipate a boom, "and 7,400 units would really be a boom." "Baltimore's downtown is an attractive place to live," he said, "but there are still challenges ... and the strength will depend clearly on job growth but being able to manage crime and to link some of the neighborhoods that are growing together so they become one cohesive fabric."

The outlook included separate studies on housing demand, demographics, retail and job growth. The partnership commissioned Zimmerman/Volk Associates to update a 2001 report that looked at housing demand in downtown and adjacent neighborhoods.

At that time, researchers projected that the downtown market could absorb about 5,000 new residential units over five years. Since then, about 3,000 new units have been completed, with an additional 1,000 under construction, and rents and sales prices have gone up.

The update shows demand for about 7,430 new homes through 2011, including 2,980 apartment rentals, 2,200 for-sale condo units and 2,250 townhouses.

"Baltimore is definitely going to continue to have a rebirth," said David Hillman, chief executive of Southern Management Corp., a developer, owner and manager of about 2,000 apartments in nine city buildings. "The national trends are going that way. People are tired of commuting two hours. People are going to want to be where the jobs and services are. And as more people move into the city, retail services will follow, and they employ people, too, and they want to live close to work."

Southern Management, one of the first developers to complete a residential conversion on downtown's west side with the Atrium apartments, is converting the BGE building on West Lexington Street into 183 apartments. After several years working to attract a supermarket to Charles Plaza, the company was able to bring in an upscale, urban version of Super Fresh, which opened recently.

The jobs report, by Baltimore-based Sage Policy Group, found that even economic blips such as the national downturn in the real estate market would likely be overcome by growth in hospitals, bioparks and base restructuring that is bringing new jobs to Aberdeen Proving Ground and Fort Meade. Those expansions will generate 17,584 jobs, $987.5 million in associated income and $2.2 billion in business revenue, according to Sage research.

Baltimore is becoming a global health center, the Sage report showed, with Johns Hopkins Hospital's $1.2 billion renovation and expansion of its medical campus, Kennedy Krieger Institute's investment of $50 million over the next few years and the University of Maryland Medical Center's new construction of a $329 million ambulatory care center. Mercy Medical Center, meanwhile, plans a $258 million clinical tower. Both Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland, Baltimore are developing biotechnology research parks, which will account for more than $1 billion in investment on downtown's east and west sides in the next decade.

Nan Rohrer, the partnership's retail development director, said retailers who dismissed downtown Baltimore a few years ago are giving the city a second look. "Retailers are waking up to the fact that there is a large and rapidly growing market in the city," she said.

Last edited by wada_guy; January 30th, 2007 at 01:18 PM.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 03:58 PM   #351
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Parking Garage Planned Under Rash Field
Tuesday, January 30, 2007
WBAL Radio as reported by John Patti




WBAL's John Patti talks to Pete Little of the Baltimore City Parking Authority about putting a parking garage under Rash Field.





How about a parking garage under Rash Field? Proposals are due back to the Baltimore City Parking Authority by February 15th on a visionary plan to redesign Rash Field at the Inner Harbor and construct a parking garage under it.

The goal is to create a park with more green space for events and activities in the area from the Maryland Science Center to the Rusty Scupper Restaurant and Ritz Carlton Hotel. It is also hoped that a 500 space parking garage will be able to be placed under the park.

Pete Little, Executive Director of the Baltimore City Parking Authority, says there is some concern for striking the water line beneath the area but he says "we anticipate that we can go down a few feet below what is currently the level of Rash Field and put a park above that."

Pete Collier, Director of Operations for the Baltimore City Parking Authority says the park will be raised closer to the level of Key Highway, so the digging will not start at the current ground level of Rash Field.

Little says while the area remains in a flood plain, there are a lot of garages built throughout the country in similar situations. Little says parking in the garage would be very safe because if ever there was a circumstance where the city thought the area would become flooded they would just evacuate the garage.

The plan to redesign Rash Field and put a parking garage beneath it has been a part of the Inner Harbor master plan for almost 15 years. It was resurrected when Little looked at planned future development and realized that development was going to occur on land currently being used for parking such as the site of the old McCormick building on Light Street and at 300 east Pratt Street..
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Old January 30th, 2007, 04:17 PM   #352
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Ritz Carlton HOTEL? What's that? Shouldn't it be the Ritz Carlton Residences?

Last edited by wada_guy; January 30th, 2007 at 04:27 PM.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 04:33 PM   #353
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My concern is the North elevation. If they are going to build a few feet higher than Key Hwy then there is going to be a large wall on the north side of the structure. I hope they include some ground level retail. The challenge will be making it (the park) inviting to people walking allong the harbor. Its going to look horrible if its just a 30' masonry wall with steps flanking it.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 04:35 PM   #354
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I really like that picture a lot. You would think they would build something on those empty areas in the foreground. That's great real estate there.

I think a key should be trying to find some place to build a great school downtown. That would go a long way in keeping people in the city when they have kids.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 05:03 PM   #355
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LOOKS LIKE THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE'S MARKET PLACE BUILDING DAYS ARE NUMBERED!

http://www.baltimoredevelopment.com/rfp.asp
The below paragraph is from the BDC's RFP that was issued on 1/7/07. This is good because Market Place is the wrong spot for that use. The property is simply to valuable to be taken up by a tax exempt organization. Move it away from the harbor to less valuable property. I think Central Avenue, near Sojourner College, would be a good choice. It would help revitalize the area between Hopkins Hospital and downtown and the institutions could even share facilities.

3.2 SCOPE OF SERVICE / DELIVERABLES

The selected Consultant will be expected to perform the Real Estate Advisory Services as defined below and to workclosely with the Contract Administrator, President of the College, the Board of Trustees, and other State Representatives to fully develop in its broadest sense, the Inner Harbor Campus (the “Property”). More specifically,
the College desires to maximize use of the Inner Harbor Campus to ensure that any and all future property development, property purchase, property leasing, etc. is to its fullest commercial potential, in the best interest of the
College and the State and maximizing revenue to the College without jeopardizing its educational mission.

Last edited by wada_guy; January 30th, 2007 at 05:17 PM.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 05:18 PM   #356
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So the report makes things look favorable, but business certainly isn't "booming". If it were, places like One Light St would be sitting dead and there would be rapid growth on the westside and Mt. Veron and Chales North/Old Goucher.

Build the core, first!! The problem is parking (again). Not enough space to put the amount tenants think they need. So they go to the far sides of downtown where it's not as much of an issue. Back to mass transit...
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Old January 30th, 2007, 05:20 PM   #357
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wada_guy View Post
LOOKS LIKE THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE'S MARKET PLACE BUILDING DAYS ARE NUMBERED!

http://www.baltimoredevelopment.com/rfp.asp
The below paragraph is from the BDC's RFP that was issued on 1/7/07. This is good because Market Place is the wrong spot for that use. The property is simply to valuable to be taken up by a tax exempt organization. Move it away from the harbor to less valuable property. I think Central Avenue, near Sojourner College, would be a good choice. It would help revitalize the area between Hopkins Hospital and downtown and the institutions could even share facilities.

3.2 SCOPE OF SERVICE / DELIVERABLES

The selected Consultant will be expected to perform the Real Estate Advisory Services as defined below and to workclosely with the Contract Administrator, President of the College, the Board of Trustees, and other State Representatives to fully develop in its broadest sense, the Inner Harbor Campus (the “Property”). More specifically,
the College desires to maximize use of the Inner Harbor Campus to ensure that any and all future property development, property purchase, property leasing, etc. is to its fullest commercial potential, in the best interest of the
College and the State and maximizing revenue to the College without jeopardizing its educational mission.
I think a downtown location is better for everybody, as the transit connections are far superior. Can't they rid the building and occupy a portion of a new building?

Nate
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Old January 30th, 2007, 05:20 PM   #358
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdeclue View Post
I really like that picture a lot. You would think they would build something on those empty areas in the foreground. That's great real estate there.

I think a key should be trying to find some place to build a great school downtown. That would go a long way in keeping people in the city when they have kids.
If you take another look at the pic you'll see there arent very many undeveloped parcels in that shot. (there HAS to be some greenery and paths for walking)

The lot adjacent to the Pier 6 Pavilion (or whatever they're calling it these days) is slated for development. Not sure about the lot next to the new Pier 6 garage.

I really think the city should do something about the parking lot opposite Della Notte. IIRC there was a residential plan for that lot. Renderings were drawn up. Nothing was built there.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 05:22 PM   #359
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Yeah, I was just about to add to that. What is the deal with all those parking lots in Lil Itly along President? I think that's a great place for some 6 to 10 story apartments.

Nate
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Old January 30th, 2007, 05:22 PM   #360
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The way this is worded sounds like they want to keep the college there no matter what happens. The building has a lot of problems including mold I believe. So I think they should just bring on the wrecking ball!!
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