daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments > DN Archives



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Closed Thread

 
Thread Tools
Old May 14th, 2007, 09:03 PM   #3581
jamie_hunt
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 4,544
Likes (Received): 814

Quote:
Originally Posted by cgunna View Post
Not really sure as the point of bringing in VA Tech to this....

AK47 on the streets of Baltimore: not surprising.

VA Tech shooting: The most violent shooting of its kind in US History.

not exactly apples to apples?
Evil is no respecter of geography.
jamie_hunt no está en línea  

Sponsored Links
Old May 14th, 2007, 09:14 PM   #3582
MasonsInquiries
B-MORE than u strive for!
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Baltimore/Columbia, Md.
Posts: 2,257
Likes (Received): 13

Quote:
Originally Posted by 30 Floors Up View Post
I assure you that when AK47's are involved, it is drug related. All we can do is collectively work together to make things better. In short, it's all a matter of shared values.
how is this so? what does AK47's have to do with drugs?
MasonsInquiries no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 09:21 PM   #3583
30 Floors Up
Registered User
 
30 Floors Up's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Blue Ridge Summit
Posts: 3,377
Likes (Received): 812

Wanted: Strong team to replace Baltimore arena
Baltimore Business Journal - 1:34 PM EDT Monday, May 14, 2007by Ryan Baltimore City officials took the first step on Monday toward replacing the aging First Mariner Arena.

M.J. "Jay" Brodie, president of the city's development group, said at a press conference Monday morning that Baltimore is asking private groups to identify possible sites for a new arena and ways to finance the project that could cost as much as $160 million.

The city's solicitation corresponded with the release of a study revealing deficiencies in the 44-year-old First Mariner Arena on West Baltimore Street downtown.

As the Baltimore Business Journal first reported in April, the study shows Baltimore would be ideal for a 15,000- to 16,000-seat minor-league arena that would cost between $120 and $160 million. That study was released by the Maryland Stadium Authority and primarily funded by the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore Inc. and the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development.

"It's time to test the market to see how much the private-sector can step up," said J. Kirby Fowler, president of the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore.

Baltimore banker and developer Edwin F. Hale Sr. already has expressed interest in building a 12,000- to 15,000 -seat arena on a 28-acre site next to his Canton Crossing development. Hale's First Mariner Bank owns the naming rights to the existing arena, and he owns the Baltimore Blast soccer team, the facility's major tenant.

Brodie said interested groups will have 120 days to respond to the city's bid -- known as a "request for expression of interest" -- once it is released. That could come within the next two months, he said.

Plans for the new arena call for 10 to 20 luxury suites and 1,000 to 1,200 club seats. The study projects more than 1 million attendees per year to the arena, and says a new facility could employ 970 people. The current arena employs 710.

Officials said it is too early to determine when a new arena would be completed.

The cost of renovating the arena would be nearly as much as building a new one and is not an option. City officials say the current site of the First Mariner Arena would be an ideal location, but new construction would take the arena out of commission for up to three years. A new, bigger arena would fit on the current site of the facility after demolition of an adjacent parking garage and surface lot.

"We are not wedded that that has to be the only location for a new arena," said Greater Baltimore Committee President Donald C. Fry. "We think there are other potential viable options that could fit well."

Fowler said he would like to see a new arena built within walking distance to the Inner Harbor, the Baltimore Convention Center, hotels and public transportation.

The study considered that Baltimore is no longer vying for an NBA or NHL team. The arena will primarily house minor-league sports, concerts and family shows. Odell Associates in Charlotte, N.C., worked on the engineering portion of the study, while KPMG completed the economic impact section.
30 Floors Up no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 09:22 PM   #3584
30 Floors Up
Registered User
 
30 Floors Up's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Blue Ridge Summit
Posts: 3,377
Likes (Received): 812

1st Mariner Arena obsolete, report says
Study recommends new facility to draw crowds but suggests no site

By Jill Rosen
Sun Reporter
Originally published May 14, 2007, 11:56 AM EDT
First Mariner Arena, Baltimore's home for indoor soccer, concerts and events like the circus, is nearly obsolete and must be replaced, according to a report released this morning. To keep drawing sports and entertainment events, the report found, Baltimore must build another arena.

"First Mariner Arena is deemed to be operationally inefficient and is increasingly becoming functionally obsolete," states the report, commissioned nearly three years ago by the Maryland Stadium Authority.

"Although the event mix is reasonably strong now, over time the building will likely begin to lose market share." The study recommends building a new arena with between 15,000 and 16,000 seats. The report does not, however, suggest a site.

Officials said demolishing the downtown building and constructing another arena on the site is an option. Another is building a new venue elsewhere.

Built in 1962 as the Baltimore Civic Center, 1st Mariner Arena has a capacity of between 11,000 to 14,000, depending on the event. It is owned by the city and managed by SMG.

City development officials said they hope the private sector will have ideas for how and where to build the new facility.

Baltimore Blast owner Ed Hale, the chairman and chief executive officer of 1st Mariner Bank, said recently that he'd like to build a new arena for the soccer team in southeast Baltimore.
30 Floors Up no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 09:27 PM   #3585
30 Floors Up
Registered User
 
30 Floors Up's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Blue Ridge Summit
Posts: 3,377
Likes (Received): 812

It's only 43, but already it's historic--it's Highfield House
Architecture: Edward Gunts



Originally published May 14, 2007
Usually, local buildings must be at least 50 years old to be designated as national landmarks. But for only the second time in its history, Baltimore's preservation commission has made an exception.

The panel voted this month to add Highfield House, a 16-story condominium building in Baltimore's Tuscany-Canterbury neighborhood, to the National Register of Historic Places - even though it's just 43 years old.

The only other Baltimore building individually listed before reaching 50 was One Charles Center, a 1962 office tower at 100 N. Charles St. It was added in 2000.

Both were designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, born in Germany and considered one of the giants of 20th-century architecture and the Modern design movement.

Some newer buildings may be found within historic districts on the National Register, but it has been rare for structures less than 50 years old to be listed singly, in part because federal guidelines make it harder. Buildings generally aren't listed, for example, while their principal designers are still living.

When structures are less than 50 years old, they also have to meet federal standards for "exceptional significance" in order to be listed. As a result, the landmark list is dominated by structures and districts that are much older.

Members of Baltimore's preservation panel say the Highfield House nomination, which the Maryland Historical Trust approved in October, could be the first of a wave of requests to recognize even more works of Modern architecture - buildings generally completed in the second half of the 20th century.

"This ... may be the start of something big in Baltimore," said commissioner Donald Kann. Highfield House is one of five buildings or districts that Baltimore's Commission on Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP) approved last week for listing on the National Register. The others were the 1866 Ruscombe Mansion near the Cylburn Arboretum, the 1892 Hendler Creamery Building in East Baltimore and districts in Upper Fells Point and Park Circle.

The University of Maryland's School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation in College Park recently conducted a survey of Modern buildings in Maryland, and the nomination grew out of that.

Highfield House was nominated because of its association with Mies van der Rohe, who died in 1969, and because it's "an outstanding example" of International Style architecture, according to preservation planner Eddie Leon. With its handsome proportions, large glass windows and lobby, flat roof and well-landscaped front lawn, the building stands out from its traditional, brick-clad neighbors on North Charles Street.

Regarded as one of the masters of modern architecture, the designer is known for mottos such as "less is more" and "God is in the details." Listing a building on the National Register does not automatically protect it from demolition or restrict an owner's property rights, but it confers a measure of historic status that can be used in marketing, and it triggers a design review process if the owner wants to make changes using federal funds. National Register listing also makes owners eligible for tax credits for historic preservation, if they complete improvements that comply with federal restoration guidelines.

Owners of the 165 Highfield House condominiums were notified about the nomination, and many supported the idea, according to Toni Perkins, property manager for the condominium association. "It's an action that the board has been pursuing," Perkins said. "People move there for the building and its architecture. The owners are extremely proud of it."

One of the strongest proponents of the landmark designation was Anne Bruder, an architectural historian who lives on the 12th floor. Besides the potential tax credits for renovations, the listing "recognizes the importance of Mies van der Rohe's contributions to the city and the state," Bruder said.

The preservation commission recently hired John Milner and Associates to help update its guidelines for nominating landmarks and reviewing and approving changes to them.

Kann said the unpaid citizens panel wants to be more aggressive about identifying buildings that deserve landmark status, on the national and local levels, before they become endangered.

"CHAP by and large is developing a mechanism to be more proactive across the board," he said. "I think we'll be seeing more modern buildings and landscapes" come up for landmark designation.

The preservation commissioners also asked city staffers to look into the possibility of nominating to the National Register a 1967 building in Charles Center, the dormant Morris A. Mechanic Theatre.

Other structures that could come up for nomination include a house by Frank Lloyd Wright and a synogogue associated with Walter Gropius.

According to Peter Kurtze, National Register administrator for the Maryland Historical Trust, the only other Modern buildings or neighborhoods in Maryland on the federal list are a 1957-1958 house in Bethesda by Wright; a house outside Westminster by Henry Hebbeln; and three Montgomery County subdivisions planned by Charles M. Goodman Associates between 1949 and 1961.

Last edited by 30 Floors Up; May 14th, 2007 at 09:58 PM.
30 Floors Up no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 09:31 PM   #3586
30 Floors Up
Registered User
 
30 Floors Up's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Blue Ridge Summit
Posts: 3,377
Likes (Received): 812

Quote:
Originally Posted by cgunna View Post
Before you start off a post with "And your solution is...."

I wasn't asking you or anybody else for a solution. I was merely ranting on what was on my mind.

Also, I'm not sure if you've ever been 30 feet from a blazing AK47/street sweeper/block burner/choppa etc,. Next time there is a shoot out with a Russian assult rifle, I've give you a call so you can jot down the tag number of the vehicle which I am sure will be properly registered and licensed to the legal owner. I, like most normal folks would, hit the ground. Forgive me for not being a super citizen as yourself.
Then why not stick to Baltimore development and leave stuff like this for your therapist if you don't want people's opinions? I was merely ranting on what was on my mind too.
30 Floors Up no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 09:38 PM   #3587
30 Floors Up
Registered User
 
30 Floors Up's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Blue Ridge Summit
Posts: 3,377
Likes (Received): 812

If they shoot this down because of traffic in Canton, I'd love to see how they could justify building an arena there. What is it about Baltimore and arenas? The Civic center was obsolete on the day it opened. If they build an arena this size, it will be too!

Icon might come to a vote
Developer, Canton activists want city to weigh in on tower

By Jill Rosen
Sun reporter
Originally published May 14, 2007
Who among the hundreds of people who packed City Hall recently to debate the ever-divisive Icon tower proposal left satisfied?

Certainly not the developer, who hoped the $75 million high-rise he's pushed for two years would inch closer to approval.

Certainly not Canton activists, who wished the City Council committee would vote down the condominium plan they've fought since Day One.

But maybe the politicians, who, by not voting at all, seemed to sidestep a sticky issue with potential for repercussions in an election year. The council's silence, however, appears to be backfiring. The developer and the Canton community - who seemingly agree on nothing else - are demanding a vote. Both sides want a final answer on the project that has weighed on the waterfront neighborhood for nearly two years.

As a result, a vote could come as soon as tomorrow, officials said late last week. "It's a head-scratcher for us because it seems like there are people who just don't want the debate to happen," says Marco Greenberg, vice president of Cignal Corp., the Timonium-based firm behind the Icon. "It seems like there's been this effort to hold it back, to delay, to sit on it, and that's what's happening again.

"There's a little bit of gamesmanship being played." Adds Nancy A. Braymer, a Canton Square resident and Icon opponent: "I think it's important that the elected officials make it absolutely clear what their position on this is." The Icon faced steep odds going into the April 18 hearing before the council's land use committee. Not only did the councilman representing Canton oppose it, so did Mayor Sheila Dixon.

Dixon and Councilman James B. Kraft had repeatedly said they would follow Canton's lead on the Icon. In other words, if the people who would have to live near the tower didn't want it, they would support them. The Icon's prospects were so bleak, committee members discussed canceling the hearing altogether. Instead, they just nixed the voting part - a long-favored political tactic that allows officials to essentially shelve unpopular legislation without having to go on the record.

But this time the council didn't just skip the vote - they announced that they were "delaying" it so the city's Transportation Department could finish a report on traffic problems in the southeastern part of town. Cignal executives immediately cried foul. Why was their project getting held up when much bigger projects in Southeast Baltimore - the Legg Mason/Four Seasons towers, for one - were being whisked to approval?

Community activists were just as skeptical. They wondered if this "delay" meant the council would eventually approve the project. With the entire council and the mayor running for re-election this year, both sides figured campaign politics were at play.

"For a politician to publicly support the project right now, they might lose votes. If they were to publicly oppose the project, they might lose votes," Greenberg said. "The only thing for them to do is nothing. Don't show leadership, just maintain the status quo."

Paul Robinson, a Federal Hill community activist who attended the hearing to support Canton, agreed. Without the election in the equation, he said, the council's inaction on the very-public Icon dispute makes little sense. "It's either incredibly cynical or a brilliant political move," he said. "Maybe both. I'd like to meet the puppet master."

Andy Frank, Dixon's deputy mayor for development, brushed off the accusations. If anyone's playing games, he said, it's not the mayor. "That kind of political calculus has not occurred," he said. "I think the mayor has made her position very clear. It's the council."

The Icon, a condominium and retail project, would rise about 260 feet, or 23 stories, from what is now a parking lot for the Lighthouse Point shopping center, a nondescript waterfront plaza anchored by a Blockbuster video store.

Before it can be built, the City Council must allow a "major amendment" to Lighthouse Point's 1980s building plan so that the developers could put more on the property than was originally allowed. To build higher than 72 feet, the developers also need an amendment to Canton's urban renewal ordinance.

Baltimore's Planning Department, Planning Commission and design review panel all endorsed the project, saying the city sorely needs denser development to keep the waterfront vibrant and to bolster the tax base. Greenberg guesses that elected officials, Kraft in particular, figure they can score more votes by shelving the project than by approving it.

"[Kraft] gets the benefit of standing up - like [Boris] Yeltsin jumping on the tank," Greenberg said. "It's all about getting people votes rather than acting in a manner that's good for the long-term, good for the city." Because he doesn't believe the city would allow the Icon to really die, Greenberg said he thinks the council will approve it later this year - after the election.

"I think after the primary, yeah," he said. "We're patient. ... We're not going anywhere. We've put a lot of blood, sweat and tears into this thing." Kraft, however, says Greenberg's boss, Cignal principal Armando Cignarale, simply can't accept the probability that the Icon will not get built.

"Mr. Cignarale is obsessed with this project, and I think it really has come to the point where you cannot have a rational, logical discussion with him about the project," Kraft said. "The door is de facto closed." Meanwhile, members of the council's land-use committee are apparently reconsidering the "delay" tactic. There's talk of putting the Icon bills back on the table for a vote as soon as this week.

A voting session was penciled in for 11:15 a.m. tomorrow, minutes before the council is scheduled to begin a day of budget hearings. "We're killing it once and for all," said Kraft, who's on the committee. " ... Everybody knows the bill's dead. But if they want a formal burial, we'll give it a formal burial."

Councilman Edward L. Reisinger, who heads the committee, said Cignal needs to rework the project, specifically make it smaller, so that Canton might accept it. If the developer doesn't want to try again, Reisinger said he'll likely call for a vote. "If things don't change, we can vote," he said. "[Cignarale] leaves me and the committee with no recourse."

Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake feels the lack of action has left "the community being yanked in a thousand directions and the developer, too," said her spokesman Shaun E. Adamec. Rawlings-Blake hopes the developer will pull the bills before tomorrow, Adamec added.

Sen. George W. Della Jr., whose district includes Baltimore's waterfront neighborhoods, including Canton, said voting on the bills is the only way to give people peace of mind.

"If you can believe what [Dixon] says, she's not signing [the bills]. We're wasting our time here. People are not comfortable with this project, and they're smart enough to realize some game is being played.

"Here's a way to clear it up once and for all: Pull the plug. Just pull the plug."

Last edited by 30 Floors Up; May 14th, 2007 at 09:52 PM.
30 Floors Up no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 09:44 PM   #3588
30 Floors Up
Registered User
 
30 Floors Up's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Blue Ridge Summit
Posts: 3,377
Likes (Received): 812

Wow. Lots of development news to talk about today.

Norwegian Cruise Lines to test Baltimore waters
Baltimore Business Journal - 2:25 PM EDT Monday, May 14, 2007

Norwegian Cruise Lines will begin offering cruises from the Port of Baltimore in 2008, the Maryland Port Administration said Monday. NCL will be the second cruise line operating out of the new South Locust Point cruise terminal that opened last year.

Considered the world's third largest cruise operator, NCL will offer 10 seven-day cruises from Baltimore to Bermuda -- on its Norwegian Majesty -- starting in June 2008.

Unless NCL decides to expand its offerings, those cruises will end in August 2008.

"We are delighted to welcome Norwegian Cruise Lines for what we hope is the beginning of a long, successful relationship,'' Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a prepared statement.

About 270 direct jobs are created each time a cruise ship visits the port, according to the Maryland Port Administration. These jobs involve transportation, security, travel agency work and operations.

The state's economic impact last year from cruising was about $56 million -- a figure that includes spending on hotels, dining, entertainment and shopping.
30 Floors Up no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 09:46 PM   #3589
jpav
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 119
Likes (Received): 0

Why can't we try to get a NBA or NHL team? I don't get it. Why build a brand new midsize arena and not try to get a professional sports team in there? It doesn't make any sense. This is starting to get on my nerves! Even if we don't get a team we would still have a kick ass arena for concerts, etc. If you build something small then there is no chance for a future team. 15,000 to 16,000 F-That!
jpav no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 09:50 PM   #3590
scottbbfm
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 329
Likes (Received): 22

Arena

Honestly I would like to see 2 arenas built...one that seats about 8-10 thousand, and is fairly basic in amenities. Limited skyboxes, etc. This would be a truely multi-purpose type place. It could be used for HS games, community leagues, bigger games for colleges like Towson, graduations, conventions, smaller concerts...whatever. Canton Crossing would be a perfect location for this. This could be built almost right away.

The second arena would be your standard 15-20K with typical big league ammenities and would go after bigger events (NCAA tourney games, concerts etc) and could/should be billed as a part of the convention center. I guarantee we would get an Arena Football Team with such a place.

The main arena would be built on the old one, with the canton arena being the stop-gap. PLENTY of cities support 2 arenas. The only unique thing about Baltimore is that there is no big time D-I program located in the downtown area. Most comparable cities do, and this is their 'other' arena. See Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Charlotte, Atlanta, Birmingham, all have secondary arenas, but they are just run by colleges.
scottbbfm no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 09:50 PM   #3591
Huck
Registered User
 
Huck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 309
Likes (Received): 28

Quote:
Originally Posted by 30 Floors Up View Post
It's only 43, but already it's historic--it's Highfield House
Other structures that could come up for nomination include a house by Frank Lloyd Wright and a synogogue associated with Walter Gropius.
I LOVE Highfield House. It is sleek and elegant. I know of the Frank Lloyd Wright house in the area, but have never seen it. I'm sure it is lovely. The synagogue desingned by Gropius on Park Heights (if I recollect) is really cool structure with a dome. Well worth saving...

... and then the Mechanic WTF?
__________________
Native Baltimorean (Baltimoron)
Huck no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 10:01 PM   #3592
cgunna
2A
 
cgunna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 739
Likes (Received): 7

WTF do they mean Baltimore is no longer in the running for an NBA/NHL team?

Who the hell is/was qualified to make such a stupid statement?
cgunna no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 10:06 PM   #3593
30 Floors Up
Registered User
 
30 Floors Up's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Blue Ridge Summit
Posts: 3,377
Likes (Received): 812

Quote:
Originally Posted by cgunna View Post
WTF do they mean Baltimore is no longer in the running for an NBA/NHL team?

Who the hell is/was qualified to make such a stupid statement?
EXACTLY! (It wasn't me - this time! LOL)
30 Floors Up no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 10:11 PM   #3594
jpav
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 119
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by cgunna View Post
WTF do they mean Baltimore is no longer in the running for an NBA/NHL team?

Who the hell is/was qualified to make such a stupid statement?
Tell me about it. I would like to know the reason why we are no longer in the running.
jpav no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 10:28 PM   #3595
Tricia_Lvs_Baltimore
Registered User
 
Tricia_Lvs_Baltimore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,342
Likes (Received): 218

Quote:
Originally Posted by 30 Floors Up View Post
If they shoot this down because of traffic in Canton, I'd love to see how they could justify building an arena there. What is it about Baltimore and arenas? The Civic center was obsolete on the day it opened. If they build an arena this size, it will be too!

Icon might come to a vote
Developer, Canton activists want city to weigh in on tower

By Jill Rosen
Sun reporter
Originally published May 14, 2007
Who among the hundreds of people who packed City Hall recently to debate the ever-divisive Icon tower proposal left satisfied?

Certainly not the developer, who hoped the $75 million high-rise he's pushed for two years would inch closer to approval.

Certainly not Canton activists, who wished the City Council committee would vote down the condominium plan they've fought since Day One.

But maybe the politicians, who, by not voting at all, seemed to sidestep a sticky issue with potential for repercussions in an election year. The council's silence, however, appears to be backfiring. The developer and the Canton community - who seemingly agree on nothing else - are demanding a vote. Both sides want a final answer on the project that has weighed on the waterfront neighborhood for nearly two years.

As a result, a vote could come as soon as tomorrow, officials said late last week. "It's a head-scratcher for us because it seems like there are people who just don't want the debate to happen," says Marco Greenberg, vice president of Cignal Corp., the Timonium-based firm behind the Icon. "It seems like there's been this effort to hold it back, to delay, to sit on it, and that's what's happening again.

"There's a little bit of gamesmanship being played." Adds Nancy A. Braymer, a Canton Square resident and Icon opponent: "I think it's important that the elected officials make it absolutely clear what their position on this is." The Icon faced steep odds going into the April 18 hearing before the council's land use committee. Not only did the councilman representing Canton oppose it, so did Mayor Sheila Dixon.

Dixon and Councilman James B. Kraft had repeatedly said they would follow Canton's lead on the Icon. In other words, if the people who would have to live near the tower didn't want it, they would support them. The Icon's prospects were so bleak, committee members discussed canceling the hearing altogether. Instead, they just nixed the voting part - a long-favored political tactic that allows officials to essentially shelve unpopular legislation without having to go on the record.

But this time the council didn't just skip the vote - they announced that they were "delaying" it so the city's Transportation Department could finish a report on traffic problems in the southeastern part of town. Cignal executives immediately cried foul. Why was their project getting held up when much bigger projects in Southeast Baltimore - the Legg Mason/Four Seasons towers, for one - were being whisked to approval?

Community activists were just as skeptical. They wondered if this "delay" meant the council would eventually approve the project. With the entire council and the mayor running for re-election this year, both sides figured campaign politics were at play.

"For a politician to publicly support the project right now, they might lose votes. If they were to publicly oppose the project, they might lose votes," Greenberg said. "The only thing for them to do is nothing. Don't show leadership, just maintain the status quo."

Paul Robinson, a Federal Hill community activist who attended the hearing to support Canton, agreed. Without the election in the equation, he said, the council's inaction on the very-public Icon dispute makes little sense. "It's either incredibly cynical or a brilliant political move," he said. "Maybe both. I'd like to meet the puppet master."

Andy Frank, Dixon's deputy mayor for development, brushed off the accusations. If anyone's playing games, he said, it's not the mayor. "That kind of political calculus has not occurred," he said. "I think the mayor has made her position very clear. It's the council."

The Icon, a condominium and retail project, would rise about 260 feet, or 23 stories, from what is now a parking lot for the Lighthouse Point shopping center, a nondescript waterfront plaza anchored by a Blockbuster video store.

Before it can be built, the City Council must allow a "major amendment" to Lighthouse Point's 1980s building plan so that the developers could put more on the property than was originally allowed. To build higher than 72 feet, the developers also need an amendment to Canton's urban renewal ordinance.

Baltimore's Planning Department, Planning Commission and design review panel all endorsed the project, saying the city sorely needs denser development to keep the waterfront vibrant and to bolster the tax base. Greenberg guesses that elected officials, Kraft in particular, figure they can score more votes by shelving the project than by approving it.

"[Kraft] gets the benefit of standing up - like [Boris] Yeltsin jumping on the tank," Greenberg said. "It's all about getting people votes rather than acting in a manner that's good for the long-term, good for the city." Because he doesn't believe the city would allow the Icon to really die, Greenberg said he thinks the council will approve it later this year - after the election.

"I think after the primary, yeah," he said. "We're patient. ... We're not going anywhere. We've put a lot of blood, sweat and tears into this thing." Kraft, however, says Greenberg's boss, Cignal principal Armando Cignarale, simply can't accept the probability that the Icon will not get built.

"Mr. Cignarale is obsessed with this project, and I think it really has come to the point where you cannot have a rational, logical discussion with him about the project," Kraft said. "The door is de facto closed." Meanwhile, members of the council's land-use committee are apparently reconsidering the "delay" tactic. There's talk of putting the Icon bills back on the table for a vote as soon as this week.

A voting session was penciled in for 11:15 a.m. tomorrow, minutes before the council is scheduled to begin a day of budget hearings. "We're killing it once and for all," said Kraft, who's on the committee. " ... Everybody knows the bill's dead. But if they want a formal burial, we'll give it a formal burial."

Councilman Edward L. Reisinger, who heads the committee, said Cignal needs to rework the project, specifically make it smaller, so that Canton might accept it. If the developer doesn't want to try again, Reisinger said he'll likely call for a vote. "If things don't change, we can vote," he said. "[Cignarale] leaves me and the committee with no recourse."

Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake feels the lack of action has left "the community being yanked in a thousand directions and the developer, too," said her spokesman Shaun E. Adamec. Rawlings-Blake hopes the developer will pull the bills before tomorrow, Adamec added.

Sen. George W. Della Jr., whose district includes Baltimore's waterfront neighborhoods, including Canton, said voting on the bills is the only way to give people peace of mind.

"If you can believe what [Dixon] says, she's not signing [the bills]. We're wasting our time here. People are not comfortable with this project, and they're smart enough to realize some game is being played.

"Here's a way to clear it up once and for all: Pull the plug. Just pull the plug."
This is getting to be annoying. Just build the Tower. Someone made a great point earlier in saying how can you justify building an Arena but it's a problem with the Tower?
__________________
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated. Founded 1908.
The First and Always The Finest
Tricia_Lvs_Baltimore no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 10:39 PM   #3596
DemolitionDave
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,336
Likes (Received): 209

Baltimore had a NHL and a NBA team and the populace didn't support them. Nothing has changed demographically to suggest the same outcome wouldn't occur. Heck, we barely support a baseball team. If the Ravens have a couple losing seasons the fans will turn their backs on them too.

There was nothing better than a Polack Johnny's hot dog with "the woiks" at 3AM in the morning. 3 of those and I never had to worry about a hangover.
DemolitionDave no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 10:45 PM   #3597
cgunna
2A
 
cgunna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 739
Likes (Received): 7

Quote:
Originally Posted by DemolitionDave View Post
Nothing has changed demographically to suggest the same outcome wouldn't occur.
HMMMM....

Your saying the City demographics in 2007 are the same as they were in the 70's?
cgunna no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 10:46 PM   #3598
slake707
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 21
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by scottbbfm View Post
I guarantee we would get an Arena Football Team with such a place.
I can guarentee an Arena Team, because Baltimore already has one. The Baltimore Blackbirds, they are members of the American Indoor Football Association. There first season is the year, and they are 1 and 9. The home games are played at First Mariner
slake707 no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 10:50 PM   #3599
sdeclue
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 879
Likes (Received): 47

Very upsetting about the arena news. My guess is that they feel like the NBA and NHL have no inclination to expand anytime soon, and there is some truth to that. The NHL def is not expanding and will most likely contract at some point. I think we could definitely get ourselves an NBA team from another city like Seattle or Memphis. Those two cities immediately come to mind.
sdeclue no está en línea  
Old May 14th, 2007, 11:02 PM   #3600
MasonsInquiries
B-MORE than u strive for!
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Baltimore/Columbia, Md.
Posts: 2,257
Likes (Received): 13

it's good to see that the railway express building is coming along nicely. it's going to compliment penn station very well.





MasonsInquiries no está en línea  


Closed Thread

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu