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Old May 18th, 2007, 01:46 PM   #3701
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BACK TO DEVELOPMENT
Building Opportunities
John's Hopkins School of Nursing

By Mary Beth Regan, Drawings courtesy Ziger/Snead LLP, Photo by John Dean

An ambitious expansion of the school, set to unfold over the next decade, will double the existing space for classrooms, labs, and offices—and provide a light-filled, congenial environment for students and faculty to forge connections with colleagues from across The Johns Hopkins University and Medical Institutions.



In a fifth floor conference room at the School of Nursing, architects Steve Ziger and Darragh Brady move buildings and atriums on a table-top schematic with ease, almost as if they are playing with Legos. To them, space is touchable—something to be harnessed to bring about a bigger goal, in this case creating a state-of-the-art 21st-century nursing campus in the heart of downtown Baltimore.

Ziger, who is known for his progressive approach to architecture, points out a window, facing east. A visitor looks out to see a soggy parking lot, some rooftops, a row of city houses, the nearby Bloomberg School of Public Health.

But Ziger already can see an entire city-block bustling with academic life: a glassy, four-story atrium that will connect the existing School of Nursing to a second eight-story building, a sunny garden that will open south to the community, a green roof-top with benches that will provide a peaceful place to sit. “This will be the heart of the campus,” Ziger says, pointing to the toy-sized atrium on the tabletop. “It will be a tall, delicate, light-filled space that includes meeting places, cafes, corridors, and green spaces.”

Ziger’s vision is the result of nearly two years of work on the proposed expansion of the School of Nursing, and eventually the nearby Bloomberg School of Public Health. The two-phase project, to be built over the next decade, will create an urban oasis that uses progressive architecture to foster interaction between the School of Nursing and other vital institutions at Hopkins, including the Phoebe R. Berman Bioethics Institute and Bloomberg School of Public Health. Unlike some projects aimed at solving simple space problems, says Ziger, this expansion will create an environment where faculty, staff, and students can interact with colleagues from other institutes to provide a cross-pollination of ideas and experiences. “The architecture needs to speak to the aspirations of the institution,” Ziger says.

In the case of the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, those aspirations are indeed high. In its relatively short history as a degree-granting division of Johns Hopkins, founded in 1984, the School of Nursing has skyrocketed to the top of the nation’s nursing circles. Today, the school is ranked 8th nationwide for its National Institutes of Health grants, receiving more than $7 million for research each year. The school also is known worldwide for its excellence in teaching, research, and clinical practice.

But in order to continue this trajectory, says Dean Martha N. Hill, PhD, RN, FAAN, the school has no choice but to expand. In fact, Hill sees the expansion of the school’s physical space as so critical to its mission that she placed fundraising for the new building as her top priority in her annual State of the School Address last September. “Academic nursing is thriving at Johns Hopkins,” she said. “We have a lot of traction and a lot of potential.”

There’s no doubt the school has come a long way since the early part of the century when it was a diploma program known as the Johns Hopkins Hospital Training School. In those days, Hill admits, “the nurses got the basement of the hospital for classrooms when the doctors weren’t using them.” The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing became a degree-granting program in 1984, but it did not have its own building until more than a decade later. In 1998, after ten years of work by a cadre of dedicated volunteers, the $17.2 million Anne M. Pinkard Building opened its doors to faculty, staff, and students. “We had been scattered across the campus,” Hill says. “This building was designed to bring us together — to give us a home.”

But it wasn’t too long after moving into their new home that school administrators knew they would need more space. The reason was two-fold: First, the nation was in the midst of what would become a full-blown nursing crisis, with not enough registered nurses to staff hospitals nationwide. Second, health care was changing rapidly and there was a huge need for highly skilled nursing teachers, clinicians, and researchers. “The space becomes a limiting factor,” Hill says. “It’s the same old problem of the tail wagging the dog.”

Walter D. (Wally) Pinkard Jr., son of Anne M. Pinkard, and chair of the school’s National Advisory Committee, serves on the board of the Johns Hopkins University Trustees. As a member of the Board of Trustees’ Building and Grounds Committee, he is involved in a larger master-planning effort that involves the entire East Baltimore campus. From that vantage point, Pinkard says: “The space demands at Nursing are pretty self-evident. So I don’t think we have much of a choice. We have to find the money to get this thing done.”

The Baltimore architectural firm, Ziger/Snead LLP, was selected to do the master planning and design work because it is highly regarded as progressive. Among other projects, the firm has designed the addition to the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and the stunning Downtown Center of Hopkins’ Carey Business School on Charles and Fayette streets.

Pinkard says he is encouraged by the East Baltimore master plan because it is long-range and forward thinking. “Health care is changing dramatically,” Pinkard says. “The way care is delivered in the clinical setting relies very much on collaboration and teamwork.” That teamwork, he says, has to be fostered among the university’s health divisions.

As Ziger and Brady outline the master plan, they talk first about Phase One, to be started in 2008. It will include the four-story atrium to the east of the current Pinkard Building, which will connect to an eight-story building housing the nursing school and the Berman Bioethics Institute. The Berman Center will have an entrance on Jefferson Street, and occupy the top three floors of the building, while the School of Nursing will occupy the basement and the first five floors. The architects also hope to include elements that contribute to a sustainable environment such as the “green roof” concept that helps create cleaner air and healthier communities.


Phase One, to be started in 2008, will include the four-story atrium to the east of the current Pinkard Building, which will connect to an eight-story building housing the nursing school and the Berman Bioethics Institute.

For the School of Nursing, the new building will double the current space for offices, classrooms, and labs, providing 100,000 square feet of additional space. It will include: two state-of-the-art, 175-seat lecture halls; two 30-seat computer labs; small break-out rooms; classrooms; faculty offices; a new Dean’s Office; and a new suite for the school’s Center for Nursing Research.

As a result of the added space, Hill plans to expand existing programs as well as create new ones. For one, Hill plans to expand the clinical doctoral program, addressing the nation’s nursing shortage by educating graduate nurses to become expert clinicians. She also intends to enlarge the Center for Nursing Research, which conducts cutting-edge nursing research. What’s more, Hill expects to have new space to welcome scholars from around the world. “We want to be able to maintain and increase our national and international reputation,” she says. “To do that, we must have a stimulating environment that is an attractive go-to place.”

In Phase Two, which may be built within the next decade, the architects propose a second atrium, east of the new nursing building, that will connect the school to the planned public health building. The complex will be connected by bridges, skywalks, and atrium corridors.

Brady, who did much of the design work, points to the small-scale atrium that connects to the Pinkard building. “This will extend the school’s living and student space,” she says, “It will become one big, wonderful campus.”

It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement: The Pinkard Building will remain, with its huge windows, warm cherry trim, and welcoming decor. Yet when you walk into the building, you will be drawn into the large atrium that connects to the new building, hardly noticing that you are moving from one building to the other. Like the Pinkard Building, the new nursing building will circulate around a central staircase so that light from outside can stream inside, adding to the open, airy feeling.

Eventually, you’ll be able to walk through the nursing building to an atrium that takes you to the Bloomberg School. At a cafe, you may bump into faculty, students, or colleagues from nursing, bioethics, public health or the nearby School of Medicine or Hospital.

There will be plenty of green space. The School of Nursing’s garden will be moved to the south, allowing an increase in size and better sun exposure. “Our garden is a private, secluded sanctuary, almost a cloister,” says the Dean. “It will not only be kept, but it will be enhanced. It’s going to be a place where nurses and students can go to enjoy, to be refreshed. This will be a place where people can sit down and receive. We all must do that—take time to reflect, to replenish.

Priscilla Teeter, a 1951 graduate of the school, is excited about the plans for expansion and thrilled that her alma mater has the clout to claim its own research and teaching space. “It’s just marvelous to see how the School of Nursing has come into its own,” she says.

To date, the school has raised more than $15 million for the $42 million project. Two well-known philanthropic organizations—the France-Merrick Foundation, headed by Pinkard, and the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation— each have pledged $5 million.

Hill, who has deftly managed the school’s budget, paying off the mortgage last year, has no hesitations about jumping back into the fundraising fray.

“I can lie awake all night in an anxiety state over this,” she says. “Or I can say, ‘We’ve got one chance to do this, and to do it right. We’re not just doing this for today. We’re doing it for the next 50 years.’

“I ask myself: Is this the right thing to do? Is this the right time to do it? My answer: There’s no choice but to move forward.”
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Old May 18th, 2007, 05:26 PM   #3702
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1 STEP FORWARD:
36 Hours in Baltimore
The New York Times

I think only a New York paper could refer to us as small town. We are the 19th largest city in the nation on our own.
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Old May 18th, 2007, 05:27 PM   #3703
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Discovery Store closings

I hope it won't take too long to fill the soon to be empty and highly visible space in the Light Street pavilion.


NEW YORK (Hollywood Reporter) - Discovery Communications announced on Thursday that it will close its 103 stand-alone and mall-based retail stores, cutting 1,000 jobs, or 25 percent of the company's global workforce, in the process.
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Old May 18th, 2007, 07:02 PM   #3704
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Developer hopes to jump-start Station North
May 18, 2007 3:00 AM (8 hrs ago)

City Council President Stephanie Rawlings-Blake tours the new Station North town house development. BALTIMORE (Map, News) - City officials greeted the opening of an ambitious — if risky — town house project just a few blocks from Baltimore’s Pennsylvania Station on Thursday morning.

Station North, 33 multilevel town houses with balconies, large windows and attached garages, was touted by City Council President Stephanie Rawlings-Blake as a sign of renewal for an often-troubled neighborhood.

“Our proximity to D.C. is a great asset, and this project takes advantage of it,” she said. Building a cluster of homes averaging nearly $400,000 apiece just blocks from areas known for drug dealing was a risk worth taking to jump-start a neighborhood, developer James Campbell said.

“This is [a] catalyst for the rest of the area,” he said, noting that construction on a 100-unit apartment complex has just started down the street. (Haven't heard about this. What 100 unit complex are they talking about?)

“We’re urban developers,” he said. “We understand what needs to be done.”
Campbell said 11 units have been sold and nine are under contract. Five of those have been sold to people relocating from D.C.

City Councilman Jack Young, D-District 12, hailed the project as a fresh start for his district. “This is what the neighborhood needed,” he said. “I’m extremely happy.”
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Old May 18th, 2007, 07:42 PM   #3705
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Quote:
Originally Posted by probaltimore View Post
I hope it won't take too long to fill the soon to be empty and highly visible space in the Light Street pavilion.


NEW YORK (Hollywood Reporter) - Discovery Communications announced on Thursday that it will close its 103 stand-alone and mall-based retail stores, cutting 1,000 jobs, or 25 percent of the company's global workforce, in the process.
Even though the Discovery store was kind of cool this sounds like a good oppertunity to get some more retail to complement Urban Outfitters.
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Old May 18th, 2007, 08:13 PM   #3706
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Wow. A lot of development news today.
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Old May 18th, 2007, 09:12 PM   #3707
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Station North

The Station North Townhomes were a bit of a disappointment to me. Not in that I didn't want them to be there but in that they look sorta bland if not ugly.

I really don't like the whole 'urban townhouse' look they were going for.


All of that said, I am pleased that they are selling. Hopefully it will trigger the rest of Calvert street to be redeveloped. Right now, most of the houses in that block are being squatted on by speculators.

you know, the 'man do you have any idea how much this will be work in ten years' crowd.
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Old May 18th, 2007, 11:18 PM   #3708
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Hey everyone. I've been very sporadic posting, but I thought I'd pass on some info I've heard about downtown office leasing.

As I think we mentioned, Venable is working out a deal to take the remaining vacant 140,000 sf of 750 e pratt, bringing the building to full occupancy. Who knows what will happen to the Mercantile building, but I suspect that PNC won't reduce its space in the facility; mostly back-office functions in Hunt Valley will go as the merger proceeds. Perhaps the deficit could be made up with displaced tenants from the B&O building, should the hotel project actually materialize there.

UBS is looking to move out of its office on Light Street (the Legg Mason building) to 100 e pratt, and PriceWaterHouse is about to get out of 250 W. Pratt and sign at 500 e. Finally, CBRE is going to consolidate its operations to 250 w., leaving 14,000 in 500 e. I expect that will lease quickly, given the building's desirable location and age. I also bet the space in the Legg Mason building will be absorbed quickly -- perhaps by one of the smaller banks in the tower, which is cramped for space as it is?

Also, 111 s calvert is now over 90% leased, 1 south has less than 2 vacant floors, and 25 s charles has about one vacant floor. Only 1 full floor available in the Candler on Market Place.

Clearly, the Pratt Street corridor is doing very well. Granted, we're mostly shuffling around tenants, but each time, there's a little net absorption, because they're leasing more than before. I think PriceWaterHouse currently occupies only 20,000 sf, for example.
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Old May 19th, 2007, 04:14 AM   #3709
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“This is [a] catalyst for the rest of the area,” he said, noting that construction on a 100-unit apartment complex has just started down the street. (Haven't heard about this. What 100 unit complex are they talking about?)

WADA, I think this is the building near Penn Station that Azola is re-habbing into condos.
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Old May 19th, 2007, 05:05 AM   #3710
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OH SNAP!!!!!!!
http://www.turnerdevelopment.com/
updated
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Old May 19th, 2007, 06:24 AM   #3711
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Quote:
Originally Posted by probaltimore View Post
I hope it won't take too long to fill the soon to be empty and highly visible space in the Light Street pavilion.


NEW YORK (Hollywood Reporter) - Discovery Communications announced on Thursday that it will close its 103 stand-alone and mall-based retail stores, cutting 1,000 jobs, or 25 percent of the company's global workforce, in the process.
This isn't too surprising. The Discovery store concept was new 15 years ago, but in recent years it seemed like fewer people were interested and gimmicky electronics are everywhere now. When they shrunk the Harborplace store to give up space to Urban Outfitters, it seemed inevitable that the store there was on measured time. I guess this concept has run its course.
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Old May 19th, 2007, 06:39 AM   #3712
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpav View Post
Even though the Discovery store was kind of cool this sounds like a good oppertunity to get some more retail to complement Urban Outfitters.
Since they shrunk the store, it's not much of a space. It's main asset seems to be that people walk through it to get to the rest of the building. It seems perfect for tourist items, but there are already enough of those.
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Old May 19th, 2007, 07:03 AM   #3713
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OH SNAP!!!!!!!
http://www.turnerdevelopment.com/
updated
pat turner is the kind of developer that i can respect. i'm almost certain that we're going to see THIS project, along with naing's tower, start to take shape before 10IH and 300EP does. that westport rendering is really starting to take shape.
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Old May 19th, 2007, 08:08 PM   #3714
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Crime in Charm City

I read a disturbing story on today's SUN Website entitled "Bolton Hill Struck with Muggings". I didn't want to post the whole story, you can read it for yourselves. The article recounts nine muggings in that area within the past few weeks, mostly at gunpoint. It centered on a wedding rehersal party of seven people standing on a street corner when a youth came buy on a bicycle and pointed a gun at one of the women, took the loot and split. Fortunately no one was physically harmed. Also in the SUN I recently read of a women shot through the front door of her home in the area around Camden Yards. These people have already decided to flee the city.

Baltimore's future is hanging precariously on by its finger tips. When these stories get around people start to get get edgy. It won't take much for panic to set in and people will split for safer areas. These little hoodlums have the power to completly destroy the city. Once the perception of insecurity sets in and residents flee, the prices of homes drop and investments ceases. Homeowners will not want to loose the value of their property, so how long before those who feel they can get value on the homes become the first to go? Then the flood gates open and the value of homes plummet. If these crimes are not immediately addressed, there will be de-investment all over town.

You can count on Baltimore's "hometown newspaper" to do what it needs to do and play this up. Its in business to sell newspaper first. Also I am sure the local TV news will get wind of this. It can set off a panic.

Tough questions need to be asked of city officials. This is an election year, these candidates better come up with some ideas to head this off. The best that can be done now is to catch these thugs and punish them severly. But we know that will not happen. If apprehended, the courts will let these poor youths off easy; they'll be released to the custody of some uncaring relative.
I don't support the idea that Wada Guy exposed yesterday. We can't punish a whole community for the sins of the lawless, but more police on the streets would be a good start.

I am anti-gun. I believe that anyone who commits a crime with a gun needs to be sentenced to twenty-five years. I don't care if the criminal is twelve years old or 112, there is no justification for pulling a gun on anyone. So sentence guidelines need to be established and enforced. There should be no defense to this; in other words, using a gun in the commission of a crime would be a "strick liability felony". The judges would have no discrestion on sentencing. I think this would cause the predator to think twice before using a gun.

Sorry to be harsh today, but things in the city seemed to be progressing. Now this stuff begins again. If not addressed the scenario I outlined above will begin to play out.

Whew, I feel better now.

Last edited by Gsol; May 19th, 2007 at 11:19 PM.
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Old May 19th, 2007, 08:51 PM   #3715
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I saw that article too. Apparently Baltimore is not the only city experiencing an increasing crime rate this year. Several of the major news outlets released a story about Philly's crime rate this year. At least they're getting the national exposure instead of Baltimore.
I think in the past year or two many Baltimoreans who are abrest of the city's encouraging growth have become optimistic that crime in the city will decline as a result, but unfortunately it is not so cut and dry. Crime in Baltimore is organized and entrenched; in many respects the drug trade is business-like. As such, you more likely than not do not sink a business simply by moving in a competitor. The czars of Baltimore's drug trade are going to fight for every block and corner in the city. It is the obligation of the city, and also its residents to fight back. I do not blame a mugging victim for leaving the city, but the city evidently cannot survive if this becomes a common response to crime.
I agree that Baltimore needs to step up its efforts and be harsher on criminals. I think the city needs to invest greater in alternative schools and juvenile detention centers. Most of Baltimore's criminals are home-grown. They are vulnerable to the same negative influences in the detention centers that they are in the streets. The city also needs to crack down on corrupt police. This is a touchy issue, I'm sure, because the police force is already want of talent as it is, but we cannot allow cops to profit by letting crime flourish.
At the moment, I , unfortunately, do not see any immediate relief on the issue of crime.
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Old May 19th, 2007, 09:30 PM   #3716
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These stories are unfortunately nothing new.These Mini crime waves are often caused by a handful of criminals until the perps are gotten off the street.What is troubling however was a story the other day about a report from the Justice Department about the alarming rise of gang activity all over the country.I feel we may be in for a upward trend of crime nationally and our local leaders will really have their work cut out for them.
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Old May 19th, 2007, 09:48 PM   #3717
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the recent councilperson proposal of instituting "martial law" is interesting. I know there are serious civil liberty concerns but at some point you have to take drastic measures....

The crime problem is difficult to crack. Do you fix the schools, tackle the drug problem, or just heavy handed law enforcement?

I would love to see the city clean house of police top brass. I see zero innovation. Pay for the best management/officers and flood the streets with officers for 5 years. It may cost 200 million but it will set the tone.
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Old May 19th, 2007, 09:55 PM   #3718
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Didn't MOM now Gov OM talk up having state police deployed here in the city? what ever came of that?
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Old May 19th, 2007, 11:32 PM   #3719
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the recent councilperson proposal of instituting "martial law" is interesting. I know there are serious civil liberty concerns but at some point you have to take drastic measures....

The crime problem is difficult to crack. Do you fix the schools, tackle the drug problem, or just heavy handed law enforcement?

I would love to see the city clean house of police top brass. I see zero innovation. Pay for the best management/officers and flood the streets with officers for 5 years. It may cost 200 million but it will set the tone.
They should decriminalize drugs. We lost that battle. Just go after violent felons, get them off the streets.

Last edited by Gsol; May 20th, 2007 at 01:48 AM.
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Old May 20th, 2007, 03:31 AM   #3720
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They should decriminalize drugs. We lost that battle. Just go after violent felons, get them off the streets.
If it were that easy I'd be all for it.


But realistically, the only way I see getting out of this is through more jails and a lot of money thrown at the police.
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