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Old May 29th, 2007, 07:25 PM   #3881
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Originally Posted by House3780 View Post
While I dont at this point favor or oppose the proposed law, Im not going to post suggestions based on my nostalgic feelings about Baltimore from way back when that have absolutely nothing to do with todays conditions (especially if i dont even live there anymore) nor post suggestions that only look good on the internet.
I think our points are comparable here, House - you're saying that we shouldn't propose solutions that look good on the internet, and we're saying that city councilpersons shouldn't propose solutions that only look good to constituents, but really have no hope of ever succeeding.

Baltimore's crime is horrendous and anything that may be able to help should be attempted. I, however, wouldn't throw Mary Pat Clarke's idea into the "may be able to help" category. I'm not so much against losing a piece of historic Baltimore as I am against wasting energy, time, money and hope on an idea that will not work, and is likely geared only towards exploiting support from constituents.

I understand your concerns about the challenges that Baltimore's police face everyday, but this idea and the troubles of other Baltimore politicians and organizations are pulled from the same basket - too much effort appeasing critics, too little effort solving problems.
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Old May 29th, 2007, 07:31 PM   #3882
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Yeah, its a big big mess, cause like you say, theyre only trying to appease whoever is breathing down their necks at the time. Im just saying, the police enforcement has been tried and has failed. Shes throwing out a new idea and while I think its too brash as it stands to ban the redevelopment of any and all abandoned properties at least its something fresh that can be worked with. Im all for more police presence too though.
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Old May 29th, 2007, 07:51 PM   #3883
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Im just saying, the police enforcement has been tried and has failed.
Unfortunately, that's so true. I guess if we had an ideal police force, enforcement alone would be sufficient, but either we don't have the numbers or the dedication or the penal system, or more likely all of the above, to satisfactorily contain crime.
To be perfectly honest, I don't see crime subsiding in the city until the middle class begins to move back into the city. Only then will the city have the money to adequately address this problem. Unfortunately, you can count on the middle class to stay in the suburbs until the school system is improved...really this is just a hellish circle, or as you put it, "a big, big mess" that could go on for a long time to come.
Fortunately, BRAC is perhaps the best opportunity the city has had in a long time to turn everything on its head and really put itself in the drivers seat.
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Old May 29th, 2007, 08:10 PM   #3884
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Once again Wada, no disrespect intended, but this is not the Baltimore you grew up in and you are looking from the outside in.

Its no where near as easy as you claim it to be. And your comment on enforcing loitering laws doesnt seem to take in to account the scrutiny the police force has been under by Baltimores citizens AND the ACLU for their enforcement of the current laws... specifically for searching and arresting people for those loitering laws. Their arrests are up considerably but because of over crowding jails and the difficulty of convicting anyone these days, enforcement of these loitering laws is not as easy as posting it on a forum.

So everyone here has to get over the man crushes and start thinking out of your 1950's Baltimore and Federal Hill mindsets. As soon as u have an abandoned store with ppl perpetually loitering outside of them no matter how many times they get arrested you would feel differently about this law. While I dont think the law is fair to everyone, Im not going to post suggestions based on my nostalgic feelings about Baltimore from way back when that have absolutely nothing to do with todays conditions (especially if i dont even live there anymore) nor post suggestions that only look good on the internet.

Last Tuesday/Wednesday morning 12 ppl were shot or stabbed, including one on water street. This is not the Baltimore you grew up in.

Go Blue Jays
I've tried to stay out of the crime discussion, but here is my two cents. By the way, it is just as bad in Washington as it is in Baltimore. There was a long article in the Post last week about the robbery spree that has been going on in Capital Hill (19 in a few days). And lest we forget the string of robberies and shootings on the Mall last year that caused a "Crime Emergency" to be declared in Washington that is still in effect.

With all due respect, many parts of Baltimore are fairly crime free. There were bad areas when I grew up just like there are now. The same things happened in the bad areas then as what happens in them now. Since my youth, some good areas in the city have gone bad, yet some bad areas have become good again. In Waverly, the houses cost $14,000 when I grew up (about $140,000 today) and not $1.4 million, so I doubt that I have a Federal Hill mindset.

A blanket law about corner stores applied to the entire city will do nothing to help solve the crime problem we have. What cleaned up New York is that they enforced the laws that were already on the books. When a cop sees someone spit on the sidewalk up there, they stop, search, and ticket them. They do the same thing when they see people drinking in public, urinating in public, playing loud music, littering, loitering, etc.

By enforcing all the laws that were all ready enacted, New York got a large percentage of the guns off of the street due to the searches. As a result, the murder rate plummeted. An added benefit was that the decent people who actually lived in the city were happier because the streets stopped being toilets and the urban environment improved.

New York set up a ticket system so that the people aren't hauled in and booked in a jail setting. They get a ticket and a fine. If they don't pay it, then they get a warrant. It is just like traffic court. Consider it "quality of life court".

It seems to be a common sense approach to me and it has a proven track record because Boston and other cities have copied it and it has worked there too. For some reason, the powers that be in Baltimore have chosen not to use this approach. Perhaps when enough people are murdered, they will. We always seem to be 10 years behind the time.

In a city where over 1/2 of the police force, the police chief, and mayor are all African American, I see no problem with this approach when it is applied equally to all. If you don't commit the petty crime, you don't have to worry about being searched. And if you do commit the petty crime, well then you deserve to be taught some manners.

I'm well aware of the Murder on Gay Street this weekend. One homeless person stabbed another. I have to wonder, do you think they were drinking in public?
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Old May 29th, 2007, 08:15 PM   #3885
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The point of arresting folks for loitering is that the targets were SUPPOSED to be the hustlers who had the 9 or 10 convictions already but somehow kept getting off with probation.

The plan was to violate their probation with an arrest so they would have to do real time. It backfired because the cops ended up locking up the whole damm neighborhood. arrest a few relatively harmless kids and that plan quickly becomes public enemy #1.


EDIT****

Just read Wada's post. And it was a good one.

Thats exactly how it was supposed to work here. The 'New York Model.' if you will. It was just totally farced up in the execution.

And somehow our leaders recommend martial law???

Last edited by cgunna; May 29th, 2007 at 08:21 PM.
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Old May 29th, 2007, 08:34 PM   #3886
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Dellusional. Thats all that can be said. Homeless man stabbing a homeless man.. I guess thats ok right??? Do you know how pompous you sound by saying that??

140,000.. maybe if they can raise it 10 more grand they'll be immune to crime.

Values of home mean nothing. Cause you know what.. as soon as the crime seeps in to places like inner harbor east, whats going to happen.. those values are going to go down and you can set urself up a forum to discuss why a homeless man getting stabbed near your building actually affects more than JUST the homeless man. You can discuss why people are selling their homes and moving out.

And this time it wont be because of racially motivated block busting that happened in the 50's and 60's which you failed to recognize with your statement about how the city is not segregated. You are the self proclaimed history buff so you should know that Baltimore was majority white and then black families were moved in to homes on blocks of white families. Fearing their home values would fall, white families began moving out, black families moving in thus starting the great white exodus (columbia didnt start it, block busting did) thus making this current city BUILT ON segregation.

This time the exodus will not be just a white one, but a upper/middle class in general because people dont feel safe in their neighborhoods or because they dont have decent schools to send their kids to. The people in the suburbs thought they could escape crime by moving to rich exclusive neighborhoods but their folly which is much like yours is that they believe their money can buy their freedom from crime. But crime in some way or another will affect us all. And if the suburbs werent able to protect themselves from drugs and crimes, what makes you think building 400,000 dollar condos in the FBIs #2 rated most dangerous city in the nation will do. Do you think criminals are going to think o wait, this is the waterfront, I read about this on skyscraper city. These homes are expensive, lets take our illegal activities elsewhere. Yeah man, I heard wada spent a lot of money on this home.. let me go somewhere else so I dont disturb his sleep.

Yes some areas are ok. Why dont you start thinking about the ones that arent (the majority). Maybe even consider a homeless mans life.

THIS IS NOT THE BALTIMORE YOU LIVED IN. Lets wait till you move in to the city. If you had kids, Id like to see whether you'd put them in the public schools or not.

Urban development goes way beyond tall buildings and density. If you dont have people feeling safe or schools to send your kids to all you are going to have are a bunch of empty "talls" which is what this city will find out if it doesnt handle crime and education.

Last edited by House3780; May 29th, 2007 at 08:46 PM.
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Old May 29th, 2007, 08:39 PM   #3887
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I value the homeless person's life as much as anyone's. I used it as an example because the news said alcohol was involved. If you are homeless and drinking, then you are doing it on the street - OBVIOUSLY.

What is your solution to the problem hot shot? You're good at criticizing everyone else. Put forth some ideas.

P.S. I grew up in the 60's and 70's damn it!

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Old May 29th, 2007, 08:52 PM   #3888
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Quote:
Originally Posted by House3780 View Post
Dellusional. Thats all that can be said. Homeless man stabbing a homeless man.. I guess thats ok right??? Do you know how pompous you sound by saying that??

140,000.. maybe if they can raise it 10 more grand they'll be immune to crime.

Values of home mean nothing. Cause you know what.. as soon as the crime seeps in to places like inner harbor east, whats going to happen.. those values are going to go down and you can set urself up a forum to discuss why a homeless man getting stabbed near your building actually affects more than JUST the homeless man. You can discuss why people are selling their homes and moving out.

And this time it wont be because of racially motivated block busting that happened in the 50's and 60's which you failed to recognize with your statement about how the city is not segregated. You are the self proclaimed history buff so you should know that Baltimore was majority white and then black families were moved in to homes on blocks of white families. Fearing their home values would fall, white families began moving out, black families moving in thus starting the great white exodus (columbia didnt start it, block busting did) thus making this current city BUILT ON segregation.

This time the exodus will not be just a white one, but a upper/middle class in general because people dont feel safe in their neighborhoods or because they dont have decent schools to send their kids to. The people in the suburbs thought they could escape crime by moving to rich exclusive neighborhoods but their folly which is much like yours is that they believe their money can buy their freedom from crime. But crime in some way or another will affect us all. And if the suburbs werent able to protect themselves from drugs and crimes, what makes you think building 400,000 dollar condos in the FBIs #2 rated most dangerous city in the nation will do. Do you think criminals are going to think o wait, this is the waterfront, I read about this on skyscraper city. These homes are expensive, lets take our illegal activities elsewhere. Yeah man, I heard wada spent a lot of money on this home.. let me go somewhere else so I dont disturb his sleep.

Yes some areas are ok. Why dont you start thinking about the ones that arent (the majority). Maybe even consider a homeless mans life.

THIS IS NOT THE BALTIMORE YOU LIVED IN. Lets wait till you move in to the city. If you had kids, Id like to see whether you'd put them in the public schools or not.

Urban development goes way beyond tall buildings and density. If you dont have people feeling safe or schools to send your kids to all you are going to have are a bunch of empty "talls" which is what this city will find out if it doesnt handle crime and education.
you are taking issue with the wrong people.
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Old May 29th, 2007, 08:58 PM   #3889
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To say this city has nice areas and not acknowledge the many bad areas is ignorance

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/loc...tory?track=rss


Amid a bloody week in which 17 city residents were shot - four fatally - Mayor Sheila Dixon announced yesterday that she will selectively increase police officer overtime and move some surveillance cameras to higher-crime areas.

......

There have been 75 more non-fatal shootings this year than there were last year at this time, an increase of 37 percent, according to city police statistics. The number of homicides is up, with 114 killings this year, compared with 104 at this time last year.

Recent victims include Jasman Elmore, 18, of the 800 block of W. Lexington St. He was a victim of a triple shooting Wednesday night at the 2300 block of Frederick Ave. Four others were shot, but not killed, that day in other incidents around the city.

Another recent homicide victim was Curtis Taylor, 22, of the 1200 block of Bloomingdale Road, who also died Wednesday. He was one of four people shot Tuesday evening on Mount Royal Avenue, near Guilford Avenue, a few blocks from Baltimore's Pennsylvania Station. Five others were shot in other incidents that day.

Killed Tuesday in separate incidents were Alexander Rose, 23, who was shot in the 2300 block of E. Fayette St., and Adrian Smith, 23, shot in the 200 block of E. 21st St.

We need other people to be outraged with us," Dixon said. "I don't think anyone wants to live in the midst of violence and murder and killings. Nobody does. We need to hear from them."

People who live in the first block of Gorman Ave. - near the scene of a shooting early yesterday morning - sat on front steps yesterday and worried about safety.

"You can't walk out here without being ... shot at," said Twinkle Scott, 22, holding her six- month-old boy on her hip. "This summer is coming, and there are going to be bodies dropping left and right."

Although everyone had heard about yesterday's nonfatal shooting, nobody said they knew who aimed the gun at a 22-year-old. He was struck in the right arm and shin when leaving a bar about 1:40 a.m. and was in good condition yesterday, said Officer Nicole Monroe, a police spokeswoman.

Deon Johnson, 13, said he heard gunshots. He said he wishes a police camera were on every block.

With his grandmother, LaTanaya Scott, looking on, Deon explained that the cameras would help solve crimes. He said such assistance is needed because most people, including himself, would never "snitch" to a police officer about a crime. "If someone tells the police and then that person finds out, they might get killed," he said. Adults nodded.

When Deon was 4, he said, his father was shot and killed.

Down the street, Janet Robertson was preparing for the funeral of her son, Alvin Parson, 22. He died at Maryland Shock Trauma Center on Saturday, nine days after two people rammed him with their car. Her son's death had been considered an accident but is now being investigated as a homicide.

When asked if she felt safe in her neighborhood, she paused for a while and said: "No."


Theyre prolly just poor though right?? Who cares right??

Whether you care or not, whether you feel as though they deserve it or not.. what happens to them will somehow affect you. Abandon these neighborhoods now and it will affect you later.

Four shootings happened along Mt Royal Avenue. How do you think this will affect MICA and UB students. Current ones will not want to live in the city after graduation or may choose to transfer. Future ones may be too scared to come.

And what about the recent pharmacy grad student shot in her home. What she said.. "I should have a tshirt.. "I came to Baltimore and all I got was a bullet in my neck." How do you think that impression will affect the people who find out her story. What do you think will happen to the value of her neighborhood when people realize they arent safe despite not having poor people as neighbors.
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Old May 29th, 2007, 09:19 PM   #3890
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still waiting for your solution....
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Old May 29th, 2007, 09:21 PM   #3891
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Making the problems better.. I think this city has 3 major problems all of which feed off of each other.. Poor education system, Drugs, Crime.

It would be incredibly tough and take many individual things, but all three must be attacked at once.

If we improve our schools but dont deter crime and drugs, what good is that education if the student is too afraid to go home or school, or gets killed or gets caught up in drugs.

What good will it do the kid if there is less crime but he cant get a good enough education to where he can make enough money to provide for himself to stay away from crime.

I think this has to be kept in mind before any initiatives. If one fails, all will eventually fail.

More motivated teachers are needed. Ones that dont give up on the students before the semester even starts. More police presence is needed so kids can get to and from their homes while feeling safe.

Other forms of education are needed.. specifically the harm of drugs and guns, AND what I think might be most important of all.. education on the possibilities that come with an education.

This one may seem weird but I can tell you as a person who grew up in Walbrook where at least 2/3 of the homes are boarded up, at least 1/2 the people my mom knew growing up died of aids from drug abuse, and where the majority of people sell or do drugs... People dont have much view of the outside. They dont know other things are possible. I tell you the truth I didnt know what was possible till I went to College park and visited friends out in potomac. Didnt even matter that I had seen something like it on tv. This was real and in my face. Its hard for people to dream big when they dont have much around them to aspire towards. This is why im very big on tearing down abandoned homes. Why do you think hospitals put windows in every room now. It wasnt always this way. Why do u think they decorate hospitals with flowers and paintings. Because a persons environment affects how a person is going to feel.

But anyways, Ive taken too much time from work today. It takes a lot more than this.. I believe this all started with one particular law that might work towards it.. My whole point is, when we're considering these laws which are being made to help us to our common goals of peaceful society, lets not consider them for selfish, nostalgic reasons or reasons that just involve height and density because Urban Development (which is why i AM talking to the write people) is more than these. Just as with the citizens of canton opposing the icon is within their rights as THEY are the people who actually live there.. people in waverly have every right to NOT want those corner stores because THEY are the people who actually live there
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Old May 29th, 2007, 09:33 PM   #3892
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PS, ive got no bitterness or resentment towards anyone here. I just get real heated when I feel strongly about something. And like many of you Ive got a lot of love for Baltimore having been born and raised here.

Its just that sometimes I feel as though Im the only one concerned with ALL of Baltimore. I hated growing up in Walbrook. I used to hate all criminals and everyone in that area actually. I like many of you probably do now felt that they chose to be the way they were. If they wanted differently they could make it so.

But having been there and being on the outside now, I can see that there are some opportunities NOT afforded to them that others get. What this means is, some people DO make the choice to make a better life for themselves, but their path is much harder than for someone with more money or in a better neighborhood, AND it is harder just to make that choice (whereas in some areas, its not a choice, its just the normal thing to do). Sure it would be nice if they wanted to help us help them or help themselves, but I think abandoning them isn't the answer either.

Building 400,000 dollar plus condos and slowly pushing the poor out (which is what it seems the city is trying to do) isnt the answer. Thats at least what I feel.
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Old May 29th, 2007, 10:32 PM   #3893
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Who doesn't feel srongly about crime? I was born and raised here too. In fact, I lived all but 12 of my 50 years in Baltimore City. I've lived in good neighborhoods, and bad ones. I've resided in Waverly (60's & 70's), Reservoir Hill (70's & 80's), Bolton Hill (90's), and Mt. Vernon (now). So I suspect my credentials are as good as yours when it comes to being a concerned Baltimorean.

You can't have it both ways. On one hand you say that most of the city is bad. On the other hand you say that cleaning up a few areas and building $400,000 condos is pushing people out. What is supposed to be done? Leave the bad areas bad? Discourage private investment? The vast majority of the residential construction downtown has been done with private money not public money. We are, after all, still a capitalist country. If someone wants to build a building and make a profit they can.

Regardless, you have to have a certain amount of people living in Baltimore who choose to pay a lot more in taxes than what they take in services. Those are the ones who foot the bill for those who take a lot more in services than what they pay in taxes. If everyone were poor, it would be rather difficult to have programs to address poverty issues.

But that aside, I hardly think the poor have been forgetten in this city. Baltimore has spent billions of dollars of affordable housing since the 50's. Hollander Ridge, all the public housing complexes, all the HUD complexes that went up in the 70's, etc. That doesn't even count the thousands of elderly units and thousands of scattered site public housing units that are in just about every neighborhood. But for some reason, it seems as though the life of a subsidised housing unit is less than 25 years before it is abandoned. It has spent even more on social programs like Head Start, drug treatment, Job Corps, etc.

You are correct - people do have choices. I have opted to raise myself to a level where I could affort a $400,000 condo. And since I was born here and attended Waverly Elementary, Northern Parkway Jr. High, and Northern High school, I make no appology for being able to do that. Nor do I feel as though I am pushing anyone out of Baltimore.

I can't think of one opportunity given to me by the government that anyone else hasn't had. My parents, on the other hand, made sure that I didn't get involved with drugs and crime and that I got a good Baltimore City Public School System education (if you don't count spelling).

I don't for a minute regret that there are $6 million dollar houses being built. If anything, I only want to work harder to be able to afford one of them because I sure as hell can't now. But I admire those that can and I certainly don't complain about them being able to. I just think that they must be a little bit smarter than me.

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Old May 30th, 2007, 01:04 AM   #3894
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Dan Rodricks had a good column on Sunday that basically called the city to task for not filling police vacancies and obsessing too much about avoiding overtime. More police on the street is one thing that has been shown to reduce crime rates.
The emphasis on homicide rates etc gives some of us tunnel vision as to how bad things can be here....
Things can be bad all over...what follows is a story from the Washington Post..

Fatal D.C. Club Shooting Prompts Closing, Questions

By Allison Klein and Amy Gardner
Washington Post Staff Writers
Monday, May 28, 2007; Page A01

A District man was fatally shot outside a swanky club on Washington's Southwest waterfront early yesterday before police shot his alleged killer in another outbreak of violence that is again bringing scrutiny to the region's night scene.

The shooting near H2O Restaurant & Lounge has prompted D.C. Police Chief Cathy L. Lanier to use her emergency powers and shut down the club for four days. It was the third time she has temporarily closed a club this year.

Such violence at a club as prominent as H2O -- which hosted a fundraiser last week for Sen. Barack Obama, a Democratic presidential candidate -- is eliciting more calls for nightclub reform. "We're in a terrible condition in these places, particularly late at night," said D.C. Council member Jim Graham (D-Ward 1). "It's sadly not surprising, and tragically so."

Nightspots in the District and Prince George's County have been under pressure in recent months after several people were shot in or near the establishments. In the District, a 17-year-old was killed in January, prompting public outcry and proposed legislation aimed at stemming the bloodshed. In Prince George's, county officials briefly ordered nine nightclubs shut down last month, saying they were magnets for violent crime. On Saturday morning, a man was shot outside one of those clubs after a fight.

The earlier D.C. violence prompted Graham to write the Youth Protection Bill, which would place greater restrictions on nightclubs that serve alcohol and allow patrons under 18. The bill is pending, following hearings earlier this year that brought a close examination of the city's thriving music scene.

At H2O yesterday, the shooting started after a party hosted by light middleweight boxing champion Floyd Mayweather. Nelson Able Jr., 39, of the 500 block of Webster Street NW, was killed about a block from H2O, which is in the 800 block of Water Street SW, police said.

The man who allegedly shot him, Rashod Holmes, 26, turned his gun on a police officer, who shot and wounded Holmes, according to police. Holmes is expected to survive.

The shooting occurred as the club was closing about 3 a.m., when Able and Holmes were arguing inside H2O, police said. Bouncers threw them out, and Holmes went to his car and got a handgun, police said.

Holmes then shot Able in the head, killing him, police said. A D.C. police officer working an overtime security detail at the club saw the shooting, authorities said.

The officer ordered Holmes to drop his gun, but Holmes turned and pointed it at the officer, police said. The officer shot Holmes in the left eye and groin, authorities said.

Holmes, of the 500 block of Shepherd Street NW, has been charged with second-degree murder while armed.

Investigators said they do not know what the men were arguing over but said it was a neighborhood dispute that probably started before the men got to the club.H2O owner Abdul Khanu said Lanier's emergency closure was unnecessary because he voluntarily canceled a party at H2O last night. Khanu said he did everything he was supposed to do, including ejecting the two men who were arguing and hiring police officers for safety.

"It is unfortunate that this happened outside like that," Khanu said. "I don't want the neighborhood to have these kinds of incidents."

The club, which has been open since 2003, often attracts political and entertainment stars. In addition to the Obama fundraiser Wednesday, entertainers Patti Labelle and P. Diddy and former president Bill Clinton have made appearances.

Police said the spot was "not a problem club." This year, police responded to seven crimes such as assault and robbery associated with H2O. Last year, there were about 25 crimes reported, police said.

Saturday night, before he was killed, Able had gone out to party with Washington's trendy crowd.

For more than 20 years, his mother, Linda Green, hadn't allowed herself to go to bed at night until she knew her son had arrived home safe. Shot twice, arrested on drug charges more than once, Able was still living the life of an aimless kid -- and it scared her to death, Green said.

So when the telephone rang at 4 a.m., she knew the news wasn't good. Green, 57, a District native, spoke angrily of the growing problem of gun violence at nightspots.

"The purpose of the club has lost its meaning," she said. "It's a social outing, not the OK Corral. The kids would rather shoot than talk. It's just so out of control
__________________
We wanna live in a dirty old town
Building it up, tearing us down
With our head in the clouds and our feet on the ground
We wanna live - dirty old town
Dirty old town

David Byrne
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Old May 30th, 2007, 02:22 AM   #3895
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I second that. I watched the first quarter of the game on ESPN, what I detected from the coverage was a sentiment toward Duke. This was backedup by a friend of mine who watched the entire coverage, and was further confirmed by the story in the NY Times.

This was more than a sporting event. It was also a news story, coverage focused on the fired coach, the players and Duke's reputation. What I take away from all I've seen and read is a news story about Duke's vindication. My friend who watched the entire ESPN coverage, said the image was that Duke really was the victor, and Hopkins was treated as an aside.

Anyway it was in Baltimore, we saw a filled stadium (in the lower stands) and very enthusiastic fans. Unfortunately we didn't see much of the city. Usually the play-by-play guys praise the city; didn't hear much of that. Baltimore should be the permanent venue since, unlike the other places, all the activity is downtown. You don't have to travel from your hotel to the event, its all centrally located. The game, hotel, restaurants and bars are all accessible by foot.

Now cough up the bucks to put the Lacrosse Hall of Fame downtown. This should be a no brainer.
I agree with with ideas to stage the lacrosse game and HOF in B-More, that would awesome to be able to see it every year. Also ESPN does have a permanent sentiment towards Duke, especially Dick Vitale, during the telecast of Maryland-Duke Basketball game the whole time MD was winning all the announcers would talk about is how Duke is getting brand new facilities. It was very annoying that they would be blatantly subjective.
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Old May 30th, 2007, 03:41 AM   #3896
Bastian
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How LONG is this crime talk gonna go on??? I come on this board to be uplifted by the learning about NEW additions to the BUILT environment. This forum is about BUILDINGS. If you wanna talk about crime, take it somewhere else like Jamie said a couple of pages back.

For real guys...STOP.

At this rate it'll will NEVER END.

This is the DEVELOPMENT FORUM.
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Old May 30th, 2007, 03:50 AM   #3897
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[QUOTE=Bastian;13443474]How LONG is this crime talk gonna go on??? [QUOTE]

3 posts hunh?
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Old May 30th, 2007, 03:55 AM   #3898
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lol...yeah i'm more of a reader....not much of a commenter.

quiet type, I guess.

You get my point though right?
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Old May 30th, 2007, 05:40 AM   #3899
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Quote:
Originally Posted by House3780 View Post
The police get mixed signals.

Baltimore over the past few years have beefed up enforcement of the no loitering laws. Arrests are way up but convictions havent followed them. And now the ACLU is on their backs as well as many community leaders, saying the arrests are unwarranted and unconstitutional.

So the police ask, well what do you want us to do? If we arrest them you say its unconstitutional. If someone gets murdered on that corner next week, we didnt get the job done.

Look at the case of the kid on the dirt bike. They arrested a 6 year old for breaking the law. The mayor and citizens were outraged and said the police should have used better judgment.

If the kid had been allowed to ride that bike and got in to an accident the police would have been blamed for not enforcing the law.

Things are a whole lot easier to explain and workout on paper/internet than they are in real life. Please remember this.

The solutions to the city's problems aren't politcally correct. That is why they try to close corner stores, hold rediculous gun buy-back schemes, and blame the cops for everything. It's much easier this way. No one is offended.

People's sensitivities are more important than common sense and right and wrong. Non-facts and a world of fantasy make the idiots and the non-thinkers feel better. Only methods, thoughts and new programs matter. Results, solutions and success do not.

As long as politicians and bureaucrats gain power from this entrenched politially correct society, there will never be results.
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Old May 30th, 2007, 06:10 AM   #3900
Tricia_Lvs_Baltimore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bastian View Post
lol...yeah i'm more of a reader....not much of a commenter.

quiet type, I guess.

You get my point though right?
Yes. Loud and clear.
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