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Old February 2nd, 2007, 06:32 AM   #461
BalWash
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterSmith View Post
Mass transit is a two prong approach. Each prong should happen simultaneously. The first prong is building a system that is capable of moving the majority of people to where they need to go. The second prong is convincing people that mass transit is worth their time and money. A few American cities have accomplished the first prong (although of those that you listed only Boston really comes close. Maybe NJ, I'm not too familiar with there.) But arguably no US city has achieved the second prong. That doesn't mean it can't be done though. Quite a few European cities and probably a few Asian cities have had success in turning mass transit into a first choice for a large percentage of the population.

Truly, I think if Baltimore hopes to revitalize itself into its former self, a world-class mass transit system is an important asset. It's one of the few certain things we can do to separate ourselves from being just another American city.
I agree with that 100%.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 06:32 AM   #462
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I've said it before, and I'll say it again...Baltimore should take a page from Portland. Portland's transit authority recently sent its transportation plan to the feds for funding approval. The feds sent it back saying that it emphasized mass transit too much and didn't mention cars nearly at all. Portland told the feds to shove it. Portland is currently constructing a fourth line to its system, which opened in 1986. They just finished and opened a few days ago a new tram line. A fifth LRT line is in planning to beign construction in a year or two, and another tram expansion is also on the way. If I'm not mistaken, much of this was paid for by a gas tax....
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 06:33 AM   #463
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Originally Posted by baltimoreisbest View Post
At some point, the highways you build will hold more capacity than the roads that lead out of them.
But that sure as hell ain't stopping Virginia from widening/building Highways.

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Originally Posted by baltimoreisbest View Post
So then you have no additional capacity to build office, research, or residential space.
Now I know thats a LIE because they are planning to widen the Beltway in Virginia and Tysons Corner is planing for more MASSIVE DEVELOPMENT near the Highways.

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Please also keep in mind that Baltimore -- perhaps to its detriment -- has built tons of parking garages recently to accommodate vehicles. Lombard St. is essentially rows of garage space.
So what Atlanta, Charlotte, Miami, and Houston Downtowns/Midtowns/Uptowns have Massive Parking Garages probably more than Baltimore.

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At some point, you will recognize that better bus and rail are necessary to move people into and out of cities.
Yeah its always good to have mix uses of Highways and Transit.

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Originally Posted by baltimoreisbest View Post
Having more highways won't solve the problem that, if someone wants to park in downtown Baltimore, they'll pay in excess of $12.
Your full of BS because Highways do solve part of the Problem.

Its funny how Atlanta, Houston, Miami, Philadelphia, and Boston does not have as much traffic issues like the Baltimore and Maryland/DC Suburbs and thats because they have a good Network of East-West/North-South Highways and Mass Transit.

Until Baltimore and other parts of Maryland complete the old Highway Plans than Mass Transit won't Do a DAMN THING to resolve traffic issues because if it did then there would not soo much traffic in the NYC area where they Have THE BEST Mass Transit Systems in the Country if not the world.

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I also suggest, Harlem, that you tone down this liberal vs. conservative thing.
What you can't handle the truth that most(not all) Democrants in Maryland don't give a Damn about the Maryland voters/tax payers they're just puppets for the Maryland hating Hicks that wants to make Maryland a Third World State while wanting Virginia to continue to be the Business/Economic Mecca.

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As someone who comes originally from New York,
And I'm from Ireland.

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I can tell you, Baltimore City and Maryland impose far fewer regulations on companies as far as parking accomodations and other amenities go.
Thats why Fairfax County, Virginia has more Office Growth than the ENTIRE City of Baltimore.

Last edited by harlem87; February 2nd, 2007 at 06:39 AM.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 06:52 AM   #464
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For a brief interlude from the current rhetoric....I submit that 1209 N. Charles is essentially topped off.

It's nice to have that "full" closed-in experience there on Charles St. This gives us essentially 3 consecutive blocks of unbroken development on that street. It looks like the 1400 block will be developed by UB in the not to distant future (the new library I think). That will give us 4 consecutive blocks.

Unfortunately, I think Kingdon Gould, who I believe owns PMI parking is likely to hold onto all his Charles St parking lots farther south, until the land is worth a fortune and then sell. So development on the 800/900/1000 blocks may be a long time in coming.

(When you're taking sick leave and awaiting MRI results for a possible torn rotator cuff, one tends to spend a lot of time posting, I've noticed!)

Nate
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 06:57 AM   #465
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Building a highway through a city is bad urban planning, for the most part. It depresses land values where it is built, creates dead zones that curtail development, and contributes to a dirtier inner city.
Does this look Dirty?????




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Can you imagine what New York would have been like if Lower Manhattan was covered with expressways -- particularly along the Chambers St. corridor -- as Robert Moses planned?
Like This:









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That doesn't mean that highways are all horrible, but we have better assets than roads -- e.g., the Northeast corridor, which needs our attention and decisive investment so that it can serve us for the next century.
Another set of BS talk to make Maryland less attractive for Business/Economic/Revenue Growth, its very funny how you Maryland haters would NEVER suggest the same BS for Virginia, because you people know that it will hurt Virginia's Business/Economic/Revenue Growth which you people want to see succeed against Maryland.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 07:02 AM   #466
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterSmith View Post
Mass transit is a two prong approach. Each prong should happen simultaneously. The first prong is building a system that is capable of moving the majority of people to where they need to go. The second prong is convincing people that mass transit is worth their time and money. A few American cities have accomplished the first prong (although of those that you listed only Boston really comes close. Maybe NJ, I'm not too familiar with there.) But arguably no US city has achieved the second prong. That doesn't mean it can't be done though. Quite a few European cities and probably a few Asian cities have had success in turning mass transit into a first choice for a large percentage of the population.

Truly, I think if Baltimore hopes to revitalize itself into its former self, a world-class mass transit system is an important asset. It's one of the few certain things we can do to separate ourselves from being just another American city.
No its not going to work without Building Highways.

If you can't look at Atlanta, Miami, Houston, Philly, and Boston as an example of having Both Higways and Transit in their cities that are 100x's attractive(Business/Economic/Revenue/Population Growth) than Baltimore then your lying to yourself and everybody else.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 07:06 AM   #467
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Originally Posted by getontrac View Post
^If we had the system we need, we'd KNOW the reason Legg Mason MAY want to leave would not be PARKING!

Nate
And the way you people are expressing your hatred against Baltimore(Highways, Upscale Development, Demolishing old Buildings to build more modern office towers) I can see why Legg Mason can possibly move south to Charlotte, NC where alot of the Banking HeadQuarters are located and doing very well.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 07:10 AM   #468
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Quote:
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I've said it before, and I'll say it again...Baltimore should take a page from Portland. Portland's transit authority recently sent its transportation plan to the feds for funding approval. The feds sent it back saying that it emphasized mass transit too much and didn't mention cars nearly at all. Portland told the feds to shove it. Portland is currently constructing a fourth line to its system, which opened in 1986. They just finished and opened a few days ago a new tram line. A fifth LRT line is in planning to beign construction in a year or two, and another tram expansion is also on the way. If I'm not mistaken, much of this was paid for by a gas tax....
Portland does not get much respect on the west coast, and if you really believe the BS that you post than you really do want Baltimore to fail as a City and not be able to attract Business/Economic/Revenue Growth.

Again why hasn't this been advised to city planners in Atlanta, Charlotte, Miami, Houston, Northern Virginia, Philly, or Boston which has both Mass Transit and Highways.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 07:48 AM   #469
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Originally Posted by harlem87 View Post
Does this look Dirty?????
Another set of BS talk to make Maryland less attractive for Business/Economic/Revenue Growth, its very funny how you Maryland haters would NEVER suggest the same BS for Virginia, because you people know that it will hurt Virginia's Business/Economic/Revenue Growth which you people want to see succeed against Maryland.
Look, I'm not against all highways. I support the InterCounty Connector in Maryland. Second, I am a New Yorker, born to parents who are urban planners, and try to inject whatever enthusiasm for planning they instilled in me. I was an econ major in college, and work in the financial services sector now. Finally, we're a part of this forum because we care about growing the City of Baltimore. Transportation, you correctly note, is holding us back. I bet that a reconstruction of the NEC tunnels under the city, expanding capacity, would enhance MARC service through the state and into DC, and would ensure a real connectivity between the metro areas. Bringing the NEC to a state of good repair and improving capacity are both long overdue projects that would help development a lot more than simply widening Charles St, or another of our major thoroughfares. A lot more businesspeople from NY, Philly, and DC ride Amtrak or a commuter service than drive into the city.

However, I'm not against highways in general. Now that you've made your point, and I've made mine, let's call it a night, and move onto something different in the morning. I'll drink to that.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 07:54 AM   #470
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harlem87 View Post
And the way you people are expressing your hatred against Baltimore(Highways, Upscale Development, Demolishing old Buildings to build more modern office towers) I can see why Legg Mason can possibly move south to Charlotte, NC where alot of the Banking HeadQuarters are located and doing very well.
Where did you pull out of thin air that Legg Mason would move to Charlotte? If anything, they would relocate to suburban MARYLAND or to NY, both places where the company has existing operations. You are correct to say that Charlotte has a good banking industry. Baltimore doesn't. Part of the issue might be transportation, but I'd submit that a much longer history of the city and our state will explain our conundrum. The state has pretty high corporate taxes and attempted some credit card reforms in the 80s that backfired with a lot of relocations. As a state and city, we also haven't taken advantage of our home grown resources (e.g., Hopkins) enough to really create a whole host of complementary industries around research and medicine. And finally, deregulation of the banking industry (generally a good thing) led to more consolidation. Consolidation always favors big cities like NY, and in Charlotte's case, in part by luck of the draw, and in part by good government planning. Maryland needs to do better. You are correct. But by no means is Legg Mason looking to go to a state it has never operated in. I can tell you that, for sure.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 08:07 AM   #471
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Originally Posted by harlem87 View Post
Does this look Dirty?????


As someone who lives in Atlanta half the year I can honestly say that the pictured I-75/85 highway through Atlanta is an aweful addition to the city. It completely divides the entire downtown area (including midtown).
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 08:21 AM   #472
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As someone who lives in Atlanta half the year I can honestly say that the pictured I-75/85 highway through Atlanta is an aweful addition to the city. It completely divides the entire downtown area (including midtown).
But that does not stop you from driving on it every week.

It doesn't mater how you word it; Atlanta is 100x's better than Baltimore when attracting Business/Economic/Revenue Growth and it has better Highway/Mass Transit planing than Baltimore.

You can't deny it and if ya are then thats just a sign of delusion.

Again building only mass transit and not highways is not a Good Recipe for attracting Business/Economic/Revenue Growth it will do only the opposite which complements the Maryland Bashers dislike for More Development throughout Baltimore and the Maryland/DC suburbs.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 11:58 AM   #473
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Highways are nice, harlem, but as said, it "divides" the cohesiveness of the overall city contectivity and experience. I like to look at San Francisco as a good example/model as to "how" a city should work/run/feel. It's wonderful because of the numerous mass transit options, not because of major highways carving up the city's fabric. The idea for Baltimore, business/residential/tourism-wise is to get people to the next place as quickly and smoothly and efficiently as possible. And along those routes, make the experience one that is convenient as well.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 12:02 PM   #474
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Legg Mason says it won't leave city after lease expires
But money manager declines to reveal if it will stay in tower
By Paul Adams and Jill Rosen
Sun reporter
Originally published February 2, 2007

Legg Mason Inc. said yesterday that it will not leave Baltimore after the lease on its office expires in 2009, but declined to say it is committed to staying in the signature tower that bears its name.

The money manager's comments came after a city official said yesterday that the mayor's office and economic development officials have been working with the company for more than a year to make sure it stays in town.

Legg and its roughly 1,000 employees are part of a cornerstone in the downtown business community, and its name is a prominent feature of the city's skyline. Its departure from the office tower at 100 Light St. would leave a sizable hole in what is the city's tallest building at 35 stories.

"We're committed to Baltimore," said Mary Athridge, a spokeswoman for Legg. "The intention was always to stay in Baltimore."

Concern about Legg's plans after 2009 grew this week when the company amended its corporate bylaws to strike wording that says the firm's headquarters must be in Baltimore. The new language says the headquarters will be at "such place as the board of directors may designate."

Athridge said the change - one of a number of streamlining measures - was to bring the bylaws in line with that of other corporations, which typically do not specify a headquarters location.

The bylaws had not been changed in many years and were due to be updated, Athridge said.



Andy Frank, deputy mayor for neighborhoods and economic development, said the Baltimore Development Corp. has been working with Legg for more than a year to address any concerns it might have about staying downtown. He said that with the lease set to expire in 2009, the company "needs to make some decision soon."

"This is a high priority for everyone right now," said Frank, a former BDC vice president who recently was named deputy mayor. "I'm confident that at the end of the day they're going to keep their headquarters in Baltimore."

Frank added that the city is doing everything it can to retain Legg, but he declined to comment on the specifics of what, if anything, the city might be offering the company as inducements.



BDC officials did not return telephone calls this week. A representative of the real estate firm that owns Legg's building did not respond to a phone message yesterday.

City officials said last March that they hoped a 10-story parking garage being developed by the tower's owners would be enough to keep Legg from considering a move from its current location. Parking has long been a concern for tenants in the building. The new garage will have space for 500 cars.

M.J. "Jay" Brodie, president of the BDC, said at the time that the organization had been in discussions with Legg about its space requirements since before the firm announced in 2005 that it was entering a $3.7 billion deal to swap its brokers for Citigroup Inc.'s asset management business. Brodie said the company is going through the kind of assessment that is typical of companies with leases that are set to expire in a few years.

Kirby Fowler, president of the Downtown Partnership, said yesterday that it is routine for city economic development officials to check in with companies whose leases are due to expire, and to work with them on retention issues.

He added that Legg is likely just keeping its options open, as companies often do in similar situations.



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Old February 2nd, 2007, 03:14 PM   #475
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Where did you pull out of thin air that Legg Mason would move to Charlotte?
if i were you, i wouldn't have even responded to harlem saying this, baltimoreisbest. it's not worth the time nor the effort.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 03:43 PM   #476
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Goods news about Legg. Maybe it states it in the article, I just kind of skimmed it, but if they are going to stay in the city, I can't imagine why they wouldn't stay in the current tower. Unless they are downsizing or expanding it doesn't make sense, right? I hope it's not the former.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 04:11 PM   #477
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I really like the old rendering of 300 E. Pratt that is on the BDC website than the new rendering. I think it was you Wada that asked how many SF Lockwood Place is. I looked it up and it is a total of 90000 SF. So the new 300 E. Pratt doesn't seem like it will have a very large retail impact which sucks. I believe it was only 40000 SF of retail.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 04:27 PM   #478
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I don't know if anyone else notices this but one thing i think they can inprove downtown is the flags on the fronts of buildings. Most buildings have empty flag poles or a ratty flag with mold on it all tangled up. Is it that hard to have someone go out in the morning and untangle it. The Flag wants to fly that what it was made to do. The BofA building is a good example, they had nice long thin red flags for a while but then they where gone all the sudden. This improves the visual experience downtown. Sorry but this is one of my pet peeves.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 04:47 PM   #479
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I don't know if anyone else notices this but one thing i think they can inprove downtown is the flags on the fronts of buildings. Most buildings have empty flag poles or a ratty flag with mold on it all tangled up. Is it that hard to have someone go out in the morning and untangle it. The Flag wants to fly that what it was made to do. The BofA building is a good example, they had nice long thin red flags for a while but then they where gone all the sudden. This improves the visual experience downtown. Sorry but this is one of my pet peeves.
i agree with this. it'll make the downtown look more professional. the visual part is very important.
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Old February 2nd, 2007, 05:05 PM   #480
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I really like the old rendering of 300 E. Pratt that is on the BDC website than the new rendering. I think it was you Wada that asked how many SF Lockwood Place is. I looked it up and it is a total of 90000 SF. So the new 300 E. Pratt doesn't seem like it will have a very large retail impact which sucks. I believe it was only 40000 SF of retail.
Actually, 40,000 SF is very close to the square footage of the site footprint. So, if all the retail were to be on ground level, it would wrap the entire building and consume the entire 1st level.

I think this is a pretty good amount, truth be told!

Nate
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