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Old February 8th, 2007, 06:47 AM   #661
House3780
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Is this a current design picture for MICAs new dorm?? The green monster looked pretty ugly in the daytime shot but if its going to be translucent and lit up like theyre other building, I think it could look pretty cool coming down 83
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Old February 8th, 2007, 07:09 AM   #662
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Looks nice there.

I really want to see a shot from the North Ave side. I think they've posted on down on North, but I've not been able to get a look at it.

Nate
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Old February 8th, 2007, 08:26 AM   #663
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No...actually it was because Maryland failed to build a 16-lane expressway to provide access, tearing down the whole west side of downtown in the process. Instead, they built Camden Yards on the land.
While your being a shit head; your only proving me correct that corrupt politics and Maryland hating backwards country southern hicks have been trying to prevent Baltimore from being competative against Atlanta, Charlotte, Houston, Philly, and Boston.
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Old February 8th, 2007, 08:28 AM   #664
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Originally Posted by cgunna View Post
Harlem,

what exactly do you think is the difference between 'business,' 'economic' and 'revenue'
growth?
You tell me since you know so damn much??????
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Old February 8th, 2007, 08:30 AM   #665
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Originally Posted by harlem87 View Post
While your being a shit head; your only proving me correct that corrupt politics and Maryland hating backwards country southern hicks have been trying to prevent Baltimore from being competative against Atlanta, Charlotte, Houston, Philly, and Boston.
If you're trying to change people's opinions and influence their actions then I suggest that you alter your course to a a different tack. Name calling and frequent rants don't do much to convince. If you really want to help Maryland then I suggest you tone it down. If you don't tone it down, I'd bet there is a high probability that you will be banned, in which case you wont be able to influence anyone's opinions, or at least not at this venue.
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Old February 8th, 2007, 08:32 AM   #666
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While your being a shit head; your only proving me correct that corrupt politics and Maryland hating backwards country southern hicks have been trying to prevent Baltimore from being competative against Atlanta, Charlotte, Houston, Philly, and Boston.
Show us proof that corrupt politics was the reason the Provident Tower did not get built...
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Old February 8th, 2007, 08:34 AM   #667
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If you're trying to change people's opinions and influence their actions then I suggest that you alter your course to a a different tack. Name calling and frequent rants don't do much to convince. If you really want to help Maryland then I suggest you tone it down. If you don't tone it down, I'd bet there is a high probability that you will be banned, in which case you wont be able to influence anyone's opinions, or at least not at this venue.
Correct me if I'm, but is that supposed to be some sort of THREAT!?!?!?!?!?
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Old February 8th, 2007, 08:43 AM   #668
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Show us proof that corrupt politics was the reason the Provident Tower did not get built...
The city would not, under most circumstances, have been able to absorb all of the office construction of the late 80s and early 90s IN ADDITION TO the proposals we have here. Sure, the 80s had a runaway economy and a lot of speculative real estate, but that sort of borrowing couldn't be sustained -- and wasn't -- hence the recession of the early 90s.

Finally, Baltimore was never in a favorable position vis-a-vis other cities when it came to bank condolidation. The mid-size regional banks of the past are, for the most part, a memory, as most have yielded to mega-banks which are diversified financial institutions, doing everything from credit and commerical banking, to investment banking and real estate. A city like Baltimore is never going to benefit from consolidation; inevitably, banking capitals like New York do. We take what comes, and live...

Anyway, the whole world isn't banking. Banking has to finance SOMETHING, and that something is the range of industries we have in the metro area. So what if they aren't in office towers. We've got guaranteed winners in Tide Point, Fells Point, IHE, and Canton. Those spots blow Owings Mills out of the water. I'm sure downtown will see some modest office construction in the coming years, but as long as our empoyment figures for the traditional downtown hover at 100k, don't expect anything spectacular.

Which brings me to my final point... wouldn't MPT studios on the West Side be a brilliant driving force for that area? Right next to the arts attractions, proximity to the Hipp, where performances can be telecast, etc...
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Old February 8th, 2007, 08:51 AM   #669
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Correct me if I'm, but is that supposed to be some sort of THREAT!?!?!?!?!?
I'm not an administrator. I guess that makes you wrong/corrected?
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Old February 8th, 2007, 08:53 AM   #670
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Correct me if I'm, but is that supposed to be some sort of THREAT!?!?!?!?!?
The point is that you name-call without really allowing for constructive dialogue. You don't need to prove that you have an opinion that might be of worth... we can just have a regular conversation. The whole world isn't Crossfire.

Finally, understand that a lot of factors belie the city's current economic status, and that a series of relatively recent decisions did not make Baltimore the way it is today. I could give you the whole economic and social history of the city going back to the turn of the century, and even then it's difficult to discern what particular decisions led to the trajectory that was our history. It's complicated.

Should Baltimore be more competitive with Philadelphia and our suburban areas? Yes. How? Better transit, yes. More self-generated business entrepeneurship, better schools, a lot of things are ingredients in a city's renaissance.

I don't know where I'm going here, I'm tired, lol. I spent the day in the Baltimore City Archives -- unheated, mind you -- doing my research on McKeldin. I want a bed, hot chocolate, and a thermos next time I have to be at the archives...
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Old February 8th, 2007, 09:10 AM   #671
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The city would not, under most circumstances, have been able to absorb all of the office construction of the late 80s and early 90s IN ADDITION TO the proposals we have here. Sure, the 80s had a runaway economy and a lot of speculative real estate, but that sort of borrowing couldn't be sustained -- and wasn't -- hence the recession of the early 90s.

Finally, Baltimore was never in a favorable position vis-a-vis other cities when it came to bank condolidation. The mid-size regional banks of the past are, for the most part, a memory, as most have yielded to mega-banks which are diversified financial institutions, doing everything from credit and commerical banking, to investment banking and real estate. A city like Baltimore is never going to benefit from consolidation; inevitably, banking capitals like New York do. We take what comes, and live...

Anyway, the whole world isn't banking. Banking has to finance SOMETHING, and that something is the range of industries we have in the metro area. So what if they aren't in office towers. We've got guaranteed winners in Tide Point, Fells Point, IHE, and Canton. Those spots blow Owings Mills out of the water. I'm sure downtown will see some modest office construction in the coming years, but as long as our empoyment figures for the traditional downtown hover at 100k, don't expect anything spectacular.

Which brings me to my final point... wouldn't MPT studios on the West Side be a brilliant driving force for that area? Right next to the arts attractions, proximity to the Hipp, where performances can be telecast, etc...
I agree with that assessment...I was just calling Harlem out to provide proof of his assertion.

Didn't one of the 3 proposals for the Convention Center hotel include production space, or some sort of soundstage? Wasn't Will Smith involved with that one?
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Old February 8th, 2007, 09:13 AM   #672
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I admire those of you with the patience to try and reason with someone who is unwilling. I'm looking forward to the return of a respectful forum -- one way or another.
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Old February 8th, 2007, 09:17 AM   #673
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Usually, if you ignore people like that, they will go away. Maybe that time has arrived. We should no longer amuse him.
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Old February 8th, 2007, 01:35 PM   #674
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Hey guys, I just found this great site aimed toward tourist. It does our fair city proud! Check it out for yourselves. http://www.baltimore.world-guides.com/
this is nice. i like the way they put it together. it going to give baltimore a great deal of positive exposure.
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Old February 8th, 2007, 01:38 PM   #675
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Originally Posted by House3780 View Post


Is this a current design picture for MICAs new dorm?? The green monster looked pretty ugly in the daytime shot but if its going to be translucent and lit up like theyre other building, I think it could look pretty cool coming down 83
i like this view of the MICA dorms better than any other we've seen. looks better at night.
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Old February 8th, 2007, 03:41 PM   #676
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For downtown, a thriving 2006
$1.9 billion worth of development projects is most in many years; employers optimistic
By Jamie Smith Hopkins
sun reporter
Originally published February 8, 2007

Development projects under way last year in downtown Baltimore totaled nearly $1.9 billion, more than the area has seen for years, according to a report scheduled for release today.

Much of that - about $1.6 billion worth - is still under construction, the nonprofit Downtown Partnership of Baltimore said in its annual State of Downtown report.

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The construction work includes five hotels and nearly 1,500 apartments, condominiums and townhouses, more activity than experts remember since a recession began in 1990 and definitely the most since the group issued its first comprehensive report in 2000.

On top of that, if developers' plans come to fruition, work will begin downtown on nearly $2.8 billion in construction between now and 2010, according to the report.

"The challenge is managing growth now," said Kirby Fowler, president of the Downtown Partnership. He said the expected increase in the number of workers and residents will create demand for better traffic management, public transit and schools.

A building boom doesn't always play out the way developers expect. The increase in downtown construction could increase vacancies downtown if it outpaces demand, said Richard P. Clinch, director of economic research with the University of Baltimore's Jacob France Institute. But the rise in activity is good news for the city, he said.

After years of construction largely involving hospitals and universities, a diverse mix of projects are under way downtown, Clinch said. He attributes that to regional change: Suburban land is harder to come by, and what remains costs more than it used to, making the city more competitive.

"At some point, these things do become self-reinforcing," said Clinch, who was not involved with the Downtown Partnership report. "You're reaching a critical mass."

Downtown's economic health matters to the rest of the city and the region because it is a key employment center. About a quarter of Baltimore's 375,000 jobs are downtown, according to the Downtown Partnership, which includes the central business district, the Inner Harbor, the west side and Mount Vernon in its calculations.

The number of jobs downtown held essentially steady last year, the group said, dropping by about 225, a decrease that the group characterizes as statistically insignificant because of wiggle room in the estimate resulting from data-collection issues such as businesses that decline to participate.

The report finds that private-sector employers added nearly 1,300 jobs last year, but government cuts of 1,500 jobs overwhelmed that gain. The biggest job increase was in education services, closely followed by the accommodations and food-services sector.

More businesses opened downtown than closed or left. One of the newcomers, the software company Metastorm Inc., moved its headquarters, with about 40 people, from Columbia to new Inner Harbor office space in April and has been delighted by the variety of hotels and restaurants within walking distance. The company, which has about 160 employees overall, often has investors, customers and potential clients coming in for meetings.

"From a business perspective, being located in the heart of a city is a good thing," said Laura Mooney, Metastorm's senior director of corporate and product marketing.

Downtown employers have high expectations for the near future. They told the Downtown Partnership that they plan to add more than 6,000 jobs this year. The group says that might be overly optimistic, but increases on that scale were posted in 2005, an unusually good year.

"Some huge projects started in '06," said Bob Aydukovic, vice president of economic development for the Downtown Partnership. "This is going to start playing into the employment rolls this year and into 2008."

Some of the construction is transforming old offices into hotels and residences, which is having a ripple effect. The group found that office vacancy rates dropped to about 11 percent at the end of last year, compared with 13 percent a year earlier, and that rents inched up. Class A space, the highest-quality offices, rented for $25 to $30 a square foot, up from $24 to $28 at the end of 2005.

In another apparent ripple effect, development is expanding, touching neighborhoods that were long ignored. In communities near downtown, nearly $900 million in construction projects were completed or under way last year, and about $3.7 billion worth were planned, according to the report.

Among the projects is the huge mixed-use community planned by developer Patrick Turner in Westport, south of downtown.

"The prosperity is spreading from the heart of downtown outward," Fowler said.

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Old February 8th, 2007, 03:42 PM   #677
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Mondawmin Mall rebirth is sign of new life in city

Mondawmin Mall’s impending face-lift is the latest in a chain of events breathing of new life into the city of Baltimore.

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Michael Olesker, The Examiner
Read more by Michael Olesker
Feb 7, 2007 3:00 AM (1 day ago)
Current rank: # 411 of 17,148 articles

BALTIMORE - Jim Rouse, who gave us Harborplace, Columbia and Cross Keys, also gave us Mondawmin Mall. The last one is not often mentioned with the first three. They are heady triumphs, while Mondawmin’s history is mixed. But there’s talk, on its 50th birthday, that the old girl’s getting a face-lift, and it’s part of a good-news trend for Baltimore.

It’s also another slap at those who once said American cities were dying. Cities don’t die. Parts of cities die, while other parts are reborn, and the cycle goes on. Maybe now it’s Mondawmin’s time, and maybe some of that new life will spread elsewhere in West Baltimore. In America, we’ve learned over the last half-century (sometimes to our consternation), if you want to follow the economic future, you follow the shopping mall.

The man has been gone a decade now, but developer Jim Rouse’s photograph is still on display at Mondawmin, the mall he built in 1956. That’s him next to Gov. Theodore McKeldin on Opening Day, walking down a winding staircase above a reflecting pool with shooting fountains. Hundreds of dressed-up people gather to applaud them — and applaud what they imagined to be the endless sunny future.

But the sunlight lasted only a few ticks of the clock for Mondawmin, and then it went away. The mall, down where Liberty Heights Avenue, Reisterstown Road and Gwynns Falls Parkway merge, was practically crushed in the 1960s stampede to suburbia. Shoppers vacated, and so did quality shops. Instead of high-end retailers, the new tenants were government welfare offices, parole and probation offices, U.S. Army recruiters. Some of them are still there.

But new tenants are also be arriving. As part of a reported $70 million makeover, Mondawmin’s owners, General Growth Properties, announced the addition of Target and Shopper’s Food Warehouse to the mall. You bring in stores of this size, you’re making a couple of statements: We think there’s money here. We think there’s social stability here.

“We’re bullish on the neighborhood,” says General Growth spokesman Jim Graham. “We think there’s lots of disposable income in the area, and we like the demographic trends.”

It hasn’t always been that way. By the 1970s, some of the mall’s shops were hangouts for major drug dealers. One of the city’s best narcotics cops of the era, Ron Sallow — who’s now associate director of the state’s insurance fraud division — tailed the career heroin dealer Nathaniel “Junior Bunk” Johnson into one of the mall’s little clothing stores one day. The owner of the store spotted Sallow. They’d known each other for years.

“What are you doing here?” the owner asked.

“I’m getting ready to bust that guy over there,” whispered Sallow, pointing to Johnson.

“Well, could you wait until he buys some stuff before you bust him?” said the owner. “He’s one of my best customers.”

Here’s one of the ironies of Jim Rouse. When he was bringing life back to downtown Baltimore with Harborplace, he became known as one of America’s great urban champions. Cities are fun, he declared, ignoring much of the surrounding evidence. And, sure enough, his vision and his enthusiasm contributed enormously to downtown Baltimore’s rebirth.

But across the preceding years, Rouse was building some of the very suburban shopping malls that were pulling so many people out of the city, and out of their old gathering places.

The shopping mall has become an American symbol. It’s where the middle class goes to spend its money. If Mondawmin’s coming back, it’s one more hint of the city’s continuing renaissance.

Middle class people arrive and commercial development follows them. Cities don’t die. Parts of them die, and parts are reborn. Which parts? Sometimes you just follow the money.

Michael Olesker is an award-winning newspaper columnist, author of three books and former commentator on local radio and television. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Old February 8th, 2007, 04:09 PM   #678
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Originally Posted by MasonsInquiries View Post
i like this view of the MICA dorms better than any other we've seen. looks better at night.
Ive been bullish on that building since day one. I love the design and know that it will be a great addition to our building stock.
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Old February 8th, 2007, 05:00 PM   #679
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You know, I was thinking the same thing this afternoon on my way home. I've been working up in Hunt Valley for the last three weeks and the last few days I've been taking the Maryland Ave exit off 83 south through downtown. U of Baltimore's new university center adds so much to that area. Breath of fresh air!
I totally agree. I think blending old architecture with new makes for a vibrant cityscape. This is something European cities do so well.
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Old February 8th, 2007, 06:01 PM   #680
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Study: Downtown bursting with business

BALTIMORE - Downtown is the place to be in Charm City, says a new study that has just been released. In 2006, more than $280 million in projects were completed in downtown Baltimore, and an additional $1.5 billion is under way and scheduled for delivery in 2007-2008, according to the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore Inc.

These figures support the $67 million that was spent on planning and carrying out construction projects currently under way in downtown. More than $7.5 million of the money came from private and capital investments.

The numbers are reported in an annual economic analysis by the nonprofit Partnership for its 2006 State of Downtown Baltimore Report. The report was made public today.

With so much money being invested in development, the number of jobs has remained steady for 2006 at more than 97,000. This consistency helps support the fact that the downtown is growing, and the 7,000-job increase that occurred in 2005 is a trend, and not a fluke.

“A lot of the projects under construction are going to be mixed-use with an office component,” said Robert M. Aydukovic, vice president of economic development for the Downtown Partnership.

Broken into groups, the Partnership slices the downtown management area into four sectors — Mount Vernon Cultural with 17,654 employees; Westside with 28,017 employees; City Center with 29,213 employees; and the Inner Harbor with 22,253 employees.

As part of its analysis of the economy, the Partnership also commissioned its Outlook 2012 report compiled with help from The Goldseker Foundation. The four-part study looks at resident profiles, growing businesses, retail strategies and housing demand in downtown Baltimore.

The study estimates the downtown can absorb 7,000 new residential units during the next six years, which will cater to the 17,000 new workers expected to come to the city in the coming five years. The new workers are expected to find jobs in expanded hospitals, the University of Maryland Baltimore BioPark and in businesses related to military expansion.

The spin-off economic impact has been estimated at around $3 billion.

“We realize the quality of life and how things work is important,” said J. Kirby Fowler, president of the Downtown Partnership.

Read the State of Downtown Baltimore report and Outlook 2012.
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