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Old February 9th, 2007, 02:22 AM   #701
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Thanks Steve!!

I did hear that the Cordish Tower is moving ahead and we should hear good news by the summer. It seems like this site should be hopping by this summer with good news.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 02:28 AM   #702
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Great info Steven. Maybe I'll shoot an email over in another month and see if there are any changes.

I think a mass transit system would be huge for college students. Imagine students from places like Hopkins and Loyola and Towson taking mass transit down to Fells Point, Canton and Federal Hill? It would really enhance college life in Baltimore.

There was a mention of Cross Keys as a Rouse success in an article posted on here a page back. How do people on here feel about Cross Keys? I feel like it is very suburban with its gated community and that it pretty much disconnects itself from the rest of the city.
I stayed at the Cross Keys Inn the last time I was in Baltimore. It was certainly a good ways off from the rest of the city, but it was nice non-the-less. We were given shuttle service every day back and forth. I liked the area, personally.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 02:30 AM   #703
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I did hear that the Cordish Tower is moving ahead and we should hear good news by the summer. It seems like this site should be hopping by this summer with good news.
That's great! Can't wait for the Summer! But I'll enjoy the time in between the best I can. I'm sure this will be an overall exciting year.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 02:55 AM   #704
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ICON news.

http://www.iconatcanton.com:80/
The Link

The renders:






Dear Icon Supporters

We are pleased to inform you that the Icon development reached another
milestone last week with approval of the Project Master Plan by the Urban
Design and Architecture review Panel (UDARP). This clears the way for the
project to advance to the Planning Commission on February 22, 2007 at 3:00.
The drawings presented to the UDARP are now on the project website,
www.iconatcanton.com.

It is important that supporters of the Icon write letters and, if possible,
attend the Planning Commission meeting to voice your support.

Letters can be mailed, faxed or e-mailed to:

Robert Quilter
Architect II
Land Use and Urban Design
Baltimore City Department of Planning
417 E. Fayette St.
Baltimore, MD 21202-3433
FAX 410-244-7358
email: [email protected]

We will continue to keep you apprised of developments. Please contact me if
you have any questions, and thanks so much for your support!

Marco

Marco Greenberg
Vice President
Cignal Corp
2401 York Road
Timonium, MD 21093
410-561-4901 Phone
410-561-4905 FAX
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Old February 9th, 2007, 03:12 AM   #705
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So what if they aren't in office towers. We've got guaranteed winners in Tide Point, Fells Point, IHE, and Canton.
That's a bold statement and risky business imo. While the people on this forum are highly enthusiastic about residential over anything else, my fear is that all this residential building will be short lived especially if jobs, schools and crime are not addressed and pushed to a critical mass. Since you don’t have enough employment what will make the common people stay? They gotta pay for those tiny condos somehow? Employment is the backbone of a city, without it you’re nothing but a bedroom community.

Sometimes I cringe when I read about another residential project in Baltimore's downtown. Residential is very susceptible to deep declines much greater than office. Having them sparingly is fine but it's starting to reach a threshold; an imbalance of housing versus jobs. Baltimore's emphasis on housing over jobs in the past played a part in its decline. There is an enormous amount of rowhomes in Baltimore.

At least projects like Canton Crossing have a significant office component; the bioparks may be Baltimore's saving grace.

I am happy to read that ArcWheeler is finally considering an office component, while the bad side to this means that they’re considering the market more than I thought (which means the project will take longer for a ground breaking or possibly cancelled), it will be a better project because of the office component (higher quality design and perhaps even taller), this will be a true and great mixed use project if it is built.


Nothing does a better job of growing a population and making a place a destination than jobs, in particular white-collar jobs. A recent study said it best,

As noted by Edgar M. Hoover and Raymond Vernon in Anatomy of a Metropolis, the distribution of jobs in a metropolitan area influences the distribution of the population far more than the other way around.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 03:28 AM   #706
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wow!!!!!!!!!!! just when ya' thought developments in baltimore were dyin' off a bit, we get hit with all this GREAT news!!!!




so the tower in canton has been raised to 260 feet. that's really good news.



that email was also great to see. i was just convinced that cityscape had faded off into the abyss or somewhere. i'm glad to see that project's still around.



i have a good feelin' about one light street. stay tuned.........



i think 10IH's going to be taller than any one of us ever imagined.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 03:36 AM   #707
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And don't forget about the 4 seasons. It could become bigger and better as well.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 03:40 AM   #708
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Have to disagree a little

Really do not believe Baltimore has a large residential population downtown relative to its size. The town is growing with Hopkins, Univ of Maryland adding alot of employment. I think more attractive residential opportunities with a Target store, another Filene's type store and a movie theater would add more office jobs. The town would become more attractive to business.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Springer View Post
That's a bold statement and risky business imo. While the people on this forum are highly enthusiastic about residential over anything else, my fear is that all this residential building will be short lived especially if jobs, schools and crime are not addressed and pushed to a critical mass. Since you don’t have enough employment what will make the common people stay? They gotta pay for those tiny condos somehow? Employment is the backbone of a city, without it you’re nothing but a bedroom community.

Sometimes I cringe when I read about another residential project in Baltimore's downtown. Residential is very susceptible to deep declines much greater than office. Having them sparingly is fine but it's starting to reach a threshold; an imbalance of housing versus jobs. Baltimore's emphasis on housing over jobs in the past played a part in its decline. There is an enormous amount of rowhomes in Baltimore.

At least projects like Canton Crossing have a significant office component; the bioparks may be Baltimore's saving grace.

I am happy to read that ArcWheeler is finally considering an office component, while the bad side to this means that they’re considering the market more than I thought (which means the project will take longer for a ground breaking or possibly cancelled), it will be a better project because of the office component (higher quality design and perhaps even taller), this will be a true and great mixed use project if it is built.


Nothing does a better job of growing a population and making a place a destination than jobs, in particular white-collar jobs. A recent study said it best,

As noted by Edgar M. Hoover and Raymond Vernon in Anatomy of a Metropolis, the distribution of jobs in a metropolitan area influences the distribution of the population far more than the other way around.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 03:50 AM   #709
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The numbers say Greater Baltimore is on the move
CHRISTIAN S. JOHANSSON
Special to The Daily Record
February 8, 2007 6:27 PM
The past few years have been an exciting time to be in economic development in Greater Baltimore. Our work force continues to grow and our community is behind the investments in knowledge industries such as health care and technology. The Baltimore region is poised to raise its profile on the national stage, becoming a key destination for the most talented workers and dynamic companies.

Our numbers from this past year are telling the story. Maryland’s economy is growing and vibrant, with 36,400 new jobs added in 2006, according to Department of Labor statistics.

One of the most compelling stories is that Baltimore gained 400 jobs in 2006. This is the city’s first annual job gain since 2000 and it means people are coming back into Baltimore to work. Part of this is the renewed success of Baltimore’s tourism industry. Moody’s Precis Metro Report shows that leisure and hospitality employment has increased 4.2 percent since 2005.

Our region is a driving factor in Maryland’s economy. The increase of the labor force in the Baltimore area exceeded the entire state’s growth in 2006. The Baltimore region increased its labor force by 3.5 percent compared to a 1 percent increase statewide.

Due to the strength of our labor force, the most recent four-year data shows that the per-capita income in Greater Baltimore increased 17 percent — more than the 16 percent across Maryland and the 11 percent growth nationwide. Average earnings per job in the region have grown by 19 percent since 2000.

The work force in Greater Baltimore is shifting toward knowledge workers in the health care and technology sectors. While the overall employment growth in Greater Baltimore was 3.5 percent in the most recent four-year data, knowledge worker sectors have been seeing considerably higher growth. Employment in professional and technical services has grown 8 percent and educational services have grown 13 percent over that period.

Twenty of the top 25 employers in the Baltimore region are either in the fields of health care or technology. Employment in Greater Baltimore is dominated by employers such as Fort Meade, the Johns Hopkins University and Health System, the National Security Agency, Aberdeen Proving Ground, the University of Maryland Medical Systems, MedStar Health, Northrop Grumman and Lockheed Martin.

With initiatives related to the military base realignment and closure process and with the bio and tech parks under way at Johns Hopkins, the University of Maryland Baltimore, and the University of Maryland Baltimore County, our region is investing in our strengths and ensuring future success.

As these sectors grow, they continue to lower the unemployment rate. Unemployment in the region has been steadily decreasing since 2003, with the 2006 number at 4.2 percent — below the national average of 4.6 percent. Of the seven jurisdictions in the region, four had less than 4 percent unemployment: Howard County, 2.8 percent; Carroll County, 3.0 percent; Anne Arundel County, 3.4 percent; and Harford County, 3.6 percent. Baltimore County stood at exactly 4 percent.

With growing employment in industry sectors that demand highly educated workers and unemployment continually decreasing, it is of the utmost importance to have an education system that can dependably fill the pipeline with new talent. Greater Baltimore is already well known for our excellent universities and community colleges, but our public schools have not always received the same accolades.

It may come as a surprise to you that Expansion Management Magazine has ranked Greater Baltimore third out of all the major metropolitan areas in the United States for our public school districts. We have been fighting the negative perception of our public schools for decades and can now see that the work of our community to provide a better public education is being recognized.

This education ranking has put the Baltimore region ahead of such metro areas as Minneapolis-St. Paul, Philadelphia, Dallas, Boston and Seattle, to name a few. These areas are known for their strong knowledge worker economies, and we compete against them in attracting new business.

The facts and statistics tell the story of a region on the move. Greater Baltimore is positioned for growth and prosperity in knowledge industries such as health care and technology. The region’s strengths and potential will soon be national news.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 03:50 AM   #710
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Alex. Brown is not

Be careful about biotech. Most of these companies have yet to show profits; they are operating on subsidies, venture capital, and speculation. At some point, government incentives and incubators notwithstanding, this baby has to fly on its own or crash. A lot of other regions are also spurring their own biotech operations, and while we may have Hopkins, others have Carnegie Mellon, MIT & Harvard, Stanford, and formidable competitors. I wouldn't write Baltimore off on this one, but I wouldn't hedge a bet on something with a slim probability of return. Many biotechs simply run out of cash before they produce a medicine, and then it's only one medicine....
I agree with you, it's risky and I wish Maryland would diversify but can they? On the other hand like any other industry there is risk but people will always need medical care far more than information systems or anything else, the greatest problem with the biotech industry is time but this is a young industry and as they progress they will be able to research and produce at a quicker pace, but if you happen to hit that big one watch out! Maryland should really focus more on Biomedical devices as a "quick-in".

The good news is that Maryland has the third largest cluster in the country. In addition, Maryland Biotechs had a stellar year in venture capital for 2006, different from the dotcom years of very speculative investments. Investors are cautious while increasing investment in MD biotechs which is good news, not only that but a lot of the venture capital are from other regions in the country. No longer are they dependent on family and friends.

A lot of Maryland Biotechs reached phase III study and have submitted for FDA approval last year. The industry is finally maturing, I think last year was somewhat of a turning point, and there was a lot of top management shuffle. The Biotech industry is something that Maryland is very good at and that is why I support it. It comes naturally to us but we should be doing much better with the assets we control.

No other state can claim NIH, FDA, HHMI, JH, UMD, Institute for Genomic Research, CARB, UMBI and a multitude of other institutions. Maryland was meant to be #1 but we are faltering while other states are trying to catch up and the reason for this is because we don't work together. All the counties see each other as enemies. Baltimore should be working very closely with Montgomery County but of course "the D.C. area is avoidable". It's just going to take us that much longer (and we may never reach the top) if Baltimore/Washington doesn't work together with a strong marketing effort.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 03:54 AM   #711
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Nice Hopkins Development.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 04:02 AM   #712
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This education ranking has put the Baltimore region ahead of such metro areas as Minneapolis-St. Paul, Philadelphia, Dallas, Boston and Seattle, to name a few. These areas are known for their strong knowledge worker economies, and we compete against them in attracting new business.
this really says alot for charm city. i haven't been to dallas, but i've been to seattle, minn-st.paul, philly, and boston and education in these places are booming, and this report is saying that we're AHEAD of these places????? wow, we must be doing something right. that's for damn sure. keep up the work, b'more!!!!!!!!!
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Old February 9th, 2007, 04:06 AM   #713
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Quote:
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No other state can claim NIH, FDA, HHMI, JH, UMD, Institute for Genomic Research, CARB, UMBI and a multitude of other institutions. Maryland was meant to be #1 but we are faltering while other states are trying to catch up and the reason for this is because we don't work together. All the counties see each other as enemies. Baltimore should be working very closely with Montgomery County but of course "the D.C. area is avoidable". It's just going to take us that much longer (and we may never reach the top) if Baltimore/Washington doesn't work together with a strong marketing effort.
Don't forget USAMRID and Howard Hughes. I completely agree with what you wrote about cooperation.

I find wherever I go I'm surrounded by medical institutions. Right now, I live literally across the street from the CDC and in between 2 hospitals!
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Old February 9th, 2007, 04:27 AM   #714
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I stayed at the Cross Keys Inn the last time I was in Baltimore. It was certainly a good ways off from the rest of the city, but it was nice non-the-less. We were given shuttle service every day back and forth. I liked the area, personally.
You were up in my neck of the woods (I'm a little further out Falls Road). It's a great area to live in. You can be downtown in 10 minutes, have light rail right in the neighborhood and have lots of local retail. Also what's unique about Falls Road is that it has very little in the way of dense, tacky suburbs outside the city. There's even an intact circa 1800 rural village inside the beltway right at an old crossroads that is decorated with lots of horses. Floods, parks and ownership patterns have conspired to make it much like a country road that goes right into the center of the city. Below Hampden, it's almost like a tunnel that takes you into Dickensian Baltimore past scary old brick industrial buildings that date back 150 years. There's even a waterfall and flowing rapids on the Jones Falls down there right in the middle of the city. Sometimes I 83 zooms right overhead, but in summer it gets lost in the trees.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 04:27 AM   #715
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Mondawmin Mall rebirth is sign of new life in city

Mondawmin Mall’s impending face-lift is the latest in a chain of events breathing of new life into the city of Baltimore.

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Michael Olesker, The Examiner
Read more by Michael Olesker
Feb 7, 2007 3:00 AM (1 day ago)
Current rank: # 411 of 17,148 articles

BALTIMORE - Jim Rouse, who gave us Harborplace, Columbia and Cross Keys, also gave us Mondawmin Mall. The last one is not often mentioned with the first three. They are heady triumphs, while Mondawmin’s history is mixed. But there’s talk, on its 50th birthday, that the old girl’s getting a face-lift, and it’s part of a good-news trend for Baltimore.

It’s also another slap at those who once said American cities were dying. Cities don’t die. Parts of cities die, while other parts are reborn, and the cycle goes on. Maybe now it’s Mondawmin’s time, and maybe some of that new life will spread elsewhere in West Baltimore. In America, we’ve learned over the last half-century (sometimes to our consternation), if you want to follow the economic future, you follow the shopping mall.

The man has been gone a decade now, but developer Jim Rouse’s photograph is still on display at Mondawmin, the mall he built in 1956. That’s him next to Gov. Theodore McKeldin on Opening Day, walking down a winding staircase above a reflecting pool with shooting fountains. Hundreds of dressed-up people gather to applaud them — and applaud what they imagined to be the endless sunny future.

But the sunlight lasted only a few ticks of the clock for Mondawmin, and then it went away. The mall, down where Liberty Heights Avenue, Reisterstown Road and Gwynns Falls Parkway merge, was practically crushed in the 1960s stampede to suburbia. Shoppers vacated, and so did quality shops. Instead of high-end retailers, the new tenants were government welfare offices, parole and probation offices, U.S. Army recruiters. Some of them are still there.

But new tenants are also be arriving. As part of a reported $70 million makeover, Mondawmin’s owners, General Growth Properties, announced the addition of Target and Shopper’s Food Warehouse to the mall. You bring in stores of this size, you’re making a couple of statements: We think there’s money here. We think there’s social stability here.
If thats all they have to offer is a Target and Shoppers then that is not what is define as a MASSIVE Revitalization of a city mall.

The day they add Nieman Marcus, Bloomingdales, Nordstroms, Saks 5th Avenue, Macy's, and other upscale stores then they can say that Mondawmin's Mall has received an Major Upgrade.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 04:31 AM   #716
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this really says alot for charm city. i haven't been to dallas, but i've been to seattle, minn-st.paul, philly, and boston and education in these places are booming, and this report is saying that we're AHEAD of these places????? wow, we must be doing something right. that's for damn sure. keep up the work, b'more!!!!!!!!!
When you start counting, there are about 20 colleges in the immediate metropolitan area including 2 law schools, 2 medical schools and numerous graduate programs. JHU and UMD alone would be significant but when you add in places like Towson, UB, Goucher, UMBC, Morgan, etc, this town has a lot of college students. If you remember back when Towson was pretty small, the idea that it now has 19000 full time students is hard to believe. What we need to focus on is keeping some of those students here after they graduate.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 04:35 AM   #717
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I agree with you, it's risky and I wish Maryland would diversify but can they? On the other hand like any other industry there is risk but people will always need medical care far more than information systems or anything else, the greatest problem with the biotech industry is time but this is a young industry and as they progress they will be able to research and produce at a quicker pace, but if you happen to hit that big one watch out! Maryland should really focus more on Biomedical devices as a "quick-in".
The case for the medical business is even more compelling when you consider the demographic shift that for several decades will have a large proportion of the population being aging baby boomers. As they move into retirement, they will move from BMW's into insulin pumps, etc
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Old February 9th, 2007, 04:59 AM   #718
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wow!!!!!!!!!!! just when ya' thought developments in baltimore were dyin' off a bit, we get hit with all this GREAT news!!!!




so the tower in canton has been raised to 260 feet. that's really good news.



that email was also great to see. i was just convinced that cityscape had faded off into the abyss or somewhere. i'm glad to see that project's still around.



i have a good feelin' about one light street. stay tuned.........



i think 10IH's going to be taller than any one of us ever imagined.
I think 10 IH will be taller than we think too Mason...I'm still leaning toward 750-800 ft.

As for the ICON tower. What was the original height that was proposed? wasn't it in the upper 290' ft range? If so then 260 ft is awesome!
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Old February 9th, 2007, 05:28 AM   #719
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I think 10 IH will be taller than we think too Mason...I'm still leaning toward 750-800 ft.

As for the ICON tower. What was the original height that was proposed? wasn't it in the upper 290' ft range? If so then 260 ft is awesome!
the original was 295'
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Old February 9th, 2007, 05:45 AM   #720
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Originally Posted by Silver Springer View Post
That's a bold statement and risky business imo. While the people on this forum are highly enthusiastic about residential over anything else, my fear is that all this residential building will be short lived especially if jobs, schools and crime are not addressed and pushed to a critical mass. Since you don’t have enough employment what will make the common people stay? They gotta pay for those tiny condos somehow? Employment is the backbone of a city, without it you’re nothing but a bedroom community.

Sometimes I cringe when I read about another residential project in Baltimore's downtown. Residential is very susceptible to deep declines much greater than office. Having them sparingly is fine but it's starting to reach a threshold; an imbalance of housing versus jobs. Baltimore's emphasis on housing over jobs in the past played a part in its decline. There is an enormous amount of rowhomes in Baltimore.

At least projects like Canton Crossing have a significant office component; the bioparks may be Baltimore's saving grace.

I am happy to read that ArcWheeler is finally considering an office component, while the bad side to this means that they’re considering the market more than I thought (which means the project will take longer for a ground breaking or possibly cancelled), it will be a better project because of the office component (higher quality design and perhaps even taller), this will be a true and great mixed use project if it is built.


Nothing does a better job of growing a population and making a place a destination than jobs, in particular white-collar jobs. A recent study said it best,

As noted by Edgar M. Hoover and Raymond Vernon in Anatomy of a Metropolis, the distribution of jobs in a metropolitan area influences the distribution of the population far more than the other way around.
Actually, I was talking about the office space developed at each of these sites. Tide Point is almost entirely office...Under Armour and Advertising.com are there. These sites afford large floorplates for efficient office configurations and free parking. The distinction I was trying to make was between a traditional downtown "tower" versus an urban office park. Tenants are increasingly favoring the latter, and liking it in Baltimore. Tide Point is an awesome development, and is far more interesting than bland Owings Mills....that is, as long as ocean water levels don't rise.

But generally, I share your sentiment about becoming a bedroom community. Of course we can use a stronger business base, and you're very right to address the importance of balancing residential and office development to create a somewhat self-sustaining community.

Last edited by baltimoreisbest; February 9th, 2007 at 06:02 AM.
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