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Old February 23rd, 2007, 09:38 PM   #1261
getontrac
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Ikon

I'm for quality development and built out in Canton, but I'm not sure I like how the City has handled this. This reporting gives the immpression the City doesn't follow its own rules and the neighborhood's Master Plan. I'd have to examine this more carefully, but from a distance, it leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

Nate
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 09:50 PM   #1262
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterSmith View Post
Glad to hear about the Icon. Here's another rendering that I don't recall seeing before. Is the development on the right of the rendering already in existence? If so, what is it?

That building on the right is currently retail. The corner pictured currently houses a Blockbuster video and there is other retail along the east side of the housing units at ground level…much of it geared toward the arena. The entire streetscape along this block of Boston would change.

I stumbled along this site. You can’t take the comments too seriously from someone who cites: “a rowhouse…is a large apartment building occupying a full city block.”

There are some pretty offensive comments made here; I know several people who have added comments in defense of Baltimore.

While as a group, we can understand what these photos tell, and show…I guess you’d agree, we wish these visitors hadn’t seen this face of Baltimore.
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 10:32 PM   #1263
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I think she had a very bad tour guide . While Baltimore does have plenty of trash, there are plenty of hot spots as well.. who would take a visitor on a tour of the abandoned row homes?? Prolly a redskins fan
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 10:36 PM   #1264
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^Depends on who they are.

Some of our greatest neighborhoods are now abandoned. Giving tours to inform and/or impress requires knowledge of that person and intimate knowledge of a city.

Nate
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 11:02 PM   #1265
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One of the recommendations to renovate Pratt Street advocated tearing down the Pratt Street Pavillion. It sounded sacrilege. However, in today's "AM New York", a free paper handed out on the subways, they revealed a plan to knock down the South Street Seaport's Pier 17 building. This is a structure very similar to the Pratt Street Pravillion. The story was also confirmed on local news radio outlets. The manager of Pier 17 is General Growth, by some chance do they also manage the Inner Harbor Pavillion?

They want to put up a mulit-purpose high-rise and open up more of the waterfront to the public. I guess the days of these retail structures is fading like the old malls. But I recall in the Pratt Street proposal that they wanted to open up water views from Pratt Street. It sounded somewhat drastic, but here we have a similar proposal in New York.
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 11:15 PM   #1266
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It's the same one: General Growth. Could it really be, that the age of the "festival marketplace" is dead!?

It's all a cycle. As a colleaugue commented, next to go are the urban aquariums.
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 11:18 PM   #1267
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The person touring the city can't be taken seriously considering they don't even know what a rowhouse is. Do not be worried.

Great news on the Icon. Glad to see the city get that done and tell the NIMBY's to go home. A beautiful addition to our skyline.
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 11:27 PM   #1268
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Next on the menu: Baltimore
Lemongrass, Tsunami owners head north with cuisine, atmosphere

By KATIE ARCIERI, Staff Writer
On Valentine's Day, just after 5 p.m., Jody Danek and Gavin Buckley strode through the doors of Lemongrass, a popular Thai restaurant they own on inner West Street in Annapolis.

They were hard to miss: Mr. Danek, 38, sported gold highlights in his hair, and a black jacket accented by a blue-striped tie from Spain; Mr. Buckley, 44, was neatly dressed in a black jacket, his hair a fashionable mess.

Their image matches the chic restaurants they've opened on West Street over the past few years: Lemongrass, with minimalist decor; Tsunami, which serves up sushi and chopsticks at a stainless steel bar; and Metropolitan, popular for its upscale American fare and rooftop dining.

In addition to helping revitalize the once crime-ridden West Street, these restaurants have added glamour to the Annapolis dining scene and been successful to boot.

"You feel good when all your restaurants are full and you're like, 'OK, we picked three concepts that people like,'" said Mr. Buckley, an Australian native who still maintains the accent.

And now the pair is hoping to replicate their success in Baltimore.

Along with Tsunami Master Sushi Chef Stanley Hsu, they plan to open a 250-seat Lemongrass restaurant and a 180-seat Tsunami in May, about three blocks from the Inner Harbor.

Tsunami and Lemongrass will be tenants of the Tack Factory, a 40,000-square-foot warehouse, and former tack factory, on Bank Street.

They will stay open until 2 a.m.

The move will mark the third and largest Lemongrass restaurant. In addition to its 50-seat West Street location, the 70-seat Lemongrass Too opened last fall at Gateway Village in Parole. The Baltimore Tsunami will be the second location; its West Street site has 100 seats.

Other Tack Factory tenants include a personal training center, offering Pilates and massage, and an upscale hair salon.

Metropolitan is their highest grossing restaurant on West Street. Mr. Buckley said he and Mr. Danek are seeking a waterfront location in Baltimore for the concept.

Lemongrass and Tsunami built up a strong following on West Street with its Greenwich Village vibe, but it's Baltimore that could really put those restaurants on the map.

"We're believers in Baltimore," said Mr. Danek. "I've always felt Baltimore was the big city."

In addition to drawing young professionals and empty nesters, the two restaurants will play key roles in redeveloping the Tack Factory and the surrounding area of Baltimore, said Jim O'Hare, a partner with Bank Street Holdings LLC, which was set up to purchase the warehouse early last year.

"It's become less blue collar and less industrial and more white collar and service oriented," said Mr. O'Hare, who approached the two men last year. "What you're seeing is that there's really been a reverse of the flight out of the city. Now, people are coming back to live downtown."

Lemongrass and Tsunami are entering Charm City at a time when the dining scene has seen a resurgence of new restaurant concepts, said Licia Spinelli, vice president of marketing for the Restaurant Association of Maryland.

"The dining choices have just been growing and growing," she said. "The audience has also been growing."

While the new Lemongrass and Tsunami will focus on providing quality food, they also will be big on atmosphere.

Featuring cutting-edge decor, the Lemongrass setup in Baltimore includes a long bar and a 20-foot high Buddha statue, meditating in a large pond. As with the West Street location, servers will wear jeans and their signature brown T-shirts with a "KA POW!" patch. Ka Pow is Thai for basil, Mr. Danek said.

Past the Buddha will be a 100-seat mezzanine, with its own bar for private parties and "overflow" customers.

An interior courtyard, complete with natural-colored pod chairs where customers can relax and sip a cocktail, leads to the double doors of Tsunami and club music.

A U-shaped stainless steel bar and white tiles will make up the decor here. Sushi will be served until 1 a.m., catering to the late-night "industry" crowd, but open to everyone. Mr. Buckley said there also will be an oyster bar.

Jane and Marty Snider, Annapolis residents since 1972, braved the weather to celebrate Valentine's Day at Metropolitan on West Street.

They have watched the city's menu options change from traditional items of crab cakes and rockfish to more creative and flavorful dishes offered up by new restaurants such as Metropolitan, Tsunami and Lemongrass.

The couple particularly enjoy the "small plates" at Metropolitan, saying they like the freshness and quality.

The Sniders plan to visit the Baltimore Lemongrass and Tsunami.

"I think it's wonderful," said Mrs. Snider, a pomegranate martini before her. "They are young men who have really helped transform the restaurant scene in Annapolis. They have vision."
If this is the same building I'm thinking of, it's at the intersection of Bank Street and Central Avenue, across the street from the Canal Street Malt House. Great news for Little Italy but a bold move for this developer. The building is about 350 feet west of the Perkins Homes housing project.
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Old February 24th, 2007, 01:36 AM   #1269
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News on 10 Inner Harbor in Business Journal today

Article said 10 Inner Harbor has been redesigned and will not be 715 feet tall. Said it will be 150 feet taller than the current Legg Mason building. I thought the article said about 650 to 675 feet. My guess is it will be 50 stories.

They estimate that the project will start in 12 months and include 175 condo's ,hotel, apartments,etc..
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Old February 24th, 2007, 02:12 AM   #1270
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Why is it smaller now?
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Old February 24th, 2007, 02:53 AM   #1271
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fanofterps View Post
Article said 10 Inner Harbor has been redesigned and will not be 715 feet tall. Said it will be 150 feet taller than the current Legg Mason building. I thought the article said about 650 to 675 feet. My guess is it will be 50 stories.

They estimate that the project will start in 12 months and include 175 condo's ,hotel, apartments,etc..
The BBJ isn't infallible on its numbers; I've seen them wrong before. The LM building is over 500' tall -- perhaps 515'. So an extra 150' puts you at 665', perhaps as much as 675'. A condo tower has smaller floor-to-ceiling heights than an office tower. Say the average floor height is 10-11'. That's about 60 floors. Perhaps this is a downward revision of height somewhat, but I doubted it would ever rise much about 700'. Forty feet or so is a trivial difference.
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Old February 24th, 2007, 03:07 AM   #1272
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That website on Baltimore may be depressing, but heck, it's true. While it's natural for us urban fans to focus on glitz and skyscrapers, too many neighborhoods suffer from severely deteriorated infrastcture, inadequate amenities, and health problems. I think Baltimore has come to terms with it's deamons of race and class relations to a degree, but we still tend to be a segregated city - reticent to talk substantively about race. I am presently writing a thesis about race relations in the city's public housing and school systems during the New Deal, and while the city had a remarkable share of progressives who understood the crisis we were facing, many politicians paid lip service to their warnings, and ultimately bowed to tradition. Baltimore politics is liberalism moderated by conservatism and forbearance for "tradition." That is not to say that other cities haven't had the same problem. Boston came to terms with race disparity much later than Baltimore did, and paid the price of a tramautic 70's for it. But that does not diminish the fact that Baltimore has a long way to go in cultivating economically and culturally diverse neighborhoods. Downtown Partnership's report on the demographic compositon of downtown speaks to the heart of this problem: while the neighborhoods surrounding downtown are populated with mostly poor, mostly African American, uneducated people, downtown's residents are overwhelmingly white, predominately upper-middle-class, and highly educated. Partly because our downtown is so small and because it borders on some vastly different neighborhoods, the contrast is especially apparent. It will take all of our concerted effort -- and a lot of time -- to see that problem change for the better.
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Old February 24th, 2007, 04:30 AM   #1273
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^Yes, you are right. Though I think a lot of the politicians at the time thought that building the (LeCorbusier knockoff) projects really was a good thing.

Nate
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Old February 24th, 2007, 04:56 AM   #1274
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Well, McKeldin was a relatively progressive mayor, but within some important constraints. Sure, slum clearance and new housing construction was important, but location was a huge factor. Opposition was strong to building housing projects for African American occupancy in predominately white neighborhoods. Keep in mind that restrictive covenants were, in effect, constitutional until the Supreme Court ruled against the practice in 1948 with Shelley v. Kraemer. So the concensus in Baltimore was to build African American housing in areas where slums already existed, fulfilling the city's tacit commitment to slum clearance, while not creating a controversal project, or alternatively, the city would build on vacant sites where large populations didn't exist. That's where we got Cherry Hill Homes from -- despite warnings from engineers and housing department officials that building on a marshy site next to the city incinerator and without adequate existing public utilities was a seriously questionable use of public funds.
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Old February 24th, 2007, 05:07 AM   #1275
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^So I hear, Cherry Hill is one of the largest concentrations of public housing in the country.....

IIRC, some of the slum clearance was criticized because many of the neighborhoods were not that deteriorated and that renovating the existing housing would have been cheaper than building anew, esp. considering the quality of the new housing was not as good....long topic....

Nate
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Old February 24th, 2007, 05:27 AM   #1276
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Good news on the Icon!!! The building that houses the Blockbuster on Boston St. isn't two stories from what I can recall. The building in the rendering looks to be two stories with a lot of glass. So I'm wondering if they are going to knock that building down and start something new. Anyone know an expected start date?
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Old February 24th, 2007, 06:48 AM   #1277
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Quote:
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Good news on the Icon!!! The building that houses the Blockbuster on Boston St. isn't two stories from what I can recall. The building in the rendering looks to be two stories with a lot of glass. So I'm wondering if they are going to knock that building down and start something new. Anyone know an expected start date?
you're absolutely right; the blockbuster building isn't 2 stories. the rendering below has something that mentions a "2 story addition", so it looks like the blockbuster building is going to be eliminated altogether.
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Old February 24th, 2007, 09:09 AM   #1278
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The BBJ isn't infallible on its numbers; I've seen them wrong before. The LM building is over 500' tall -- perhaps 515'. So an extra 150' puts you at 665', perhaps as much as 675'. A condo tower has smaller floor-to-ceiling heights than an office tower. Say the average floor height is 10-11'. That's about 60 floors. Perhaps this is a downward revision of height somewhat, but I doubted it would ever rise much about 700'. Forty feet or so is a trivial difference.
The Legg Mason according to Emporis is 529 feet tall. However someplaces say it is 548 feet tall. So it would make the 10 Inner Harbor 679 to 700 feet tall.
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Old February 24th, 2007, 10:32 AM   #1279
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The Legg Mason according to Emporis is 529 feet tall. However someplaces say it is 548 feet tall. So it would make the 10 Inner Harbor 679 to 700 feet tall.
Every source I have seen for years has it at 529 feet tall, including World Almanacs dating back to the '70's. B of A tower has usually been listed at 509 feet.
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Old February 24th, 2007, 02:47 PM   #1280
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man, just when we thought we were getting at least a 700 ft. tall tower....
here we go again.......
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