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Old March 1st, 2007, 05:58 PM   #1461
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You can say that again! They're not our rival, just our bitches.
[email protected]!$#K DUKE!
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Old March 1st, 2007, 06:23 PM   #1462
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GO TERPS!!! All hail the man in my avatar!

Im going to Senior Day against NC State on Saturday. I actually get to watch the game from a suite for the first time. Should be great.
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Old March 1st, 2007, 06:30 PM   #1463
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Saw a preview of the gateway south project this morning. I think its hideous and will be looked at years from now as a big mistake. So disappointing..
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Old March 1st, 2007, 06:32 PM   #1464
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^Sensibility may yet prevail...(somehow)

Nate
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Old March 1st, 2007, 06:39 PM   #1465
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Saw a preview of the gateway south project this morning. I think its hideous and will be looked at years from now as a big mistake. So disappointing..
link? rendering? I'd like to see it.

is this the project Ray Lewis is involved in?
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Old March 1st, 2007, 06:43 PM   #1466
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It's been up before.

If someone reposts: Spare yourself! Run now! Don't look directly into its eyes!

Nate
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Old March 1st, 2007, 06:56 PM   #1467
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Does anyone know anything about the renovation of one of those old apartment buildings on Reisterstown Rd in front of Druid Hill Park?

I wonder what kind of pricing they will have, whether they're market rate, or income bracket with limitations, or what.

I'm really glad to see it fixed up. It's such a nice architectural strecth of Baltimore, between Druid Park Drive and Fulton Ave.

Nate
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Old March 1st, 2007, 07:42 PM   #1468
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link? rendering? I'd like to see it.

is this the project Ray Lewis is involved in?
Don't get me wrong. I love the programming and use, but I am not a fan of the site layout and the look of the project. it looks (and I know it isnt) lie a haphazardly thrown together mish mosh of buildings. The worst part IMO is the netted driving range towareds the water. Come in off of 395 and you see a big net? Is that the gateway we want to present... Not a fan. but if its built, I guarantee I will be using the sporting facilities with my son because at age 1.5 now, he will be ready to play once its built.
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Old March 1st, 2007, 08:47 PM   #1469
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Originally Posted by waj0527 View Post
link? rendering? I'd like to see it.

is this the project Ray Lewis is involved in?
waj, please forgive me for this.......

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Old March 1st, 2007, 09:08 PM   #1470
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Design team picked to revamp downtown's Pratt Street corridor
Baltimore Business Journal - 1:31 PM EST Thursday, March 1, 2007by Daniel

A panel of prominent city leaders has voted unanimously to hire architectural firm Ayers Saint Gross to help Baltimore with its vision for a reinvigorated Pratt Street, one complete with a trolley system, gateway-style water fountains and a new civic plaza. "The Ayers Saint Gross plan was ambitious but also practical," said Kirby Fowler, president of Downtown Partnership of Baltimore Inc., one of the city groups overseeing the process. "The team itself seems inspired and passionate about the project."

The firm's selection follows what has been a year-long process for several city agencies aimed at making the key downtown Baltimore artery more friendly to pedestrians and a stronger environment for businesses to operate from. "It is a gateway into our city and ought to be our prime pedestrian thoroughfare," Fowler said. "There are several blocks that are just not engaging for pedestrians."

The roadway has seen some degree of progress in recent years, driven by a handful of private development projects that have been completed or are in the works. One of the more visible developments has been the Lockwood Place retail project, where a Best Buy electronics store has opened and other national companies, including P.F. Chang's China Bistro and Filene's Basement, are also slated to open later this year. The Capital Grille restaurant and the Baltimore Examiner newspaper are other relatively new entries to the streetscape, which in slated include a new convention center hotel and a redesigned Verizon Building with ground-floor retail and restaurants.

Downtown Partnership, the Baltimore Development Corp., and the city's transportation and planning departments began meeting last March to consider ways to build upon those successes and create a more consistent pedestrian experience spanning the entire length of the roadway. From a list of six teams that submitted proposals in October, the Ayers Saint Gross team and three others were picked to make formal presentations of their plans during a public meeting Feb. 20.

The Tide Point architectural firm has proposed a variety of innovative options for Pratt Street, including a trolley system to run from President Street to Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, water fountains to serve as gateway entrances to the city's downtown from either end of Pratt Street, and new so-called "in-fill" structures of as high as three stories to serve as pavilions or building additions. Fowler said the trolley system is one that city leaders, including members of the Downtown Partnership and the Greater Baltimore Committee, have been considering for some time.

Fowler said not all the components of the Ayers Saint Gross plan will be implemented, and that the panel only voted to pick the Baltimore architectural firm to work with the city on a more thorough analysis of Pratt Street. "These are just conceptual plans, and the judges did not necessarily select a plan to be implemented fully; the judges selected a team to work with us block by block," he added.

Al Foxx, director of the city's transportation department, said in a statement he believes Ayers Saint Gross's vision for the roadway will make it more pleasing for those passing along Pratt Street. "The envisioned redesign of this gateway will make this important street more of an integral part of the Inner Harbor experience," Foxx said.

The Ayers Saint Gross team will now meet with city officials to formalize a contract for the project, which Fowler said could take six years to fully implement, and will then work on identifying funding sources and prioritizing which projects should be undertaken and in what order.

Fowler said city property owners, businesses and members of the public will be invited to participate in the process as it moves forward.
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Old March 1st, 2007, 09:21 PM   #1471
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waj, please forgive me for this.......

Yuck. Thats terrible. It looks cheap.

I'm usually one to say that things look better when built opposed to renderings. Remember I said the Hilton may actually turn out to be ok looking. This on the other hand isnt a marked improvement over what was there.
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Old March 1st, 2007, 11:12 PM   #1472
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Wada, thanks for the BBJ. Maybe I could rustle up a Newberry Magazine sometime for you.

BTW, here is an answered e-mail to my question concerning 10 IH.

"Steve,


I wrote the BBJ's most recent piece on 10 Inner Harbor for the Heavy Hitters section.


The source for that was John Voneiff of Arc Wheeler.


The company is in the process of reworking designs and the tower will not be as tall as originally planned.


John's information is on the company's Web site."

Heather Harlan Warnack

Special Projects Editor

Baltimore Business Journal


--------

There you have it.
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Old March 1st, 2007, 11:28 PM   #1473
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Could 2 seperate towers increase the FAR?
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Old March 1st, 2007, 11:35 PM   #1474
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If it's occupying the same lot I'd say that it would be less.
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Old March 1st, 2007, 11:45 PM   #1475
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^If the design improves significantly, I wouldn't care too much.

The original design was ho-hum. A more interesting 50 story building would be fine with me.

Nate
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 12:37 AM   #1476
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^If the design improves significantly, I wouldn't care too much.

The original design was ho-hum. A more interesting 50 story building would be fine with me.

Nate
i absolutely agree. this building is going to be in the foreground of the city's skyline, so it best be interesting and well-designed. i can't wait for it to take the curse off of that hideous red tower that is on charles street and a part of the intercontinental. that building should be imploded. i was looking at it the other day and it appears as though it was intended to have balconies, but they were never built? if you look at the windows, they have banks of smaller windows that end on a taller, door sized window.
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 01:37 AM   #1477
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i absolutely agree. this building is going to be in the foreground of the city's skyline, so it best be interesting and well-designed. i can't wait for it to take the curse off of that hideous red tower that is on charles street and a part of the intercontinental. that building should be imploded. i was looking at it the other day and it appears as though it was intended to have balconies, but they were never built? if you look at the windows, they have banks of smaller windows that end on a taller, door sized window.
I used to live at Harbor Court, in what was called the "north" tower. (It's "L" shaped in plan, so they figuratively grouped the three together from an "east", "south" and "north" tower.) As far as I know, the tower condominiums weren't intended to have balconies.

But you are correct: the windows are oddly shaped. My understanding for this is they wanted to provide more views out of the building. The tower is rather dark and heavy, anything standard probably would have created an even more dark and insidious appearance....on the inside and outside.

But what a beautiful view: especially of the skyline. Since the base of the "north" tower rests a wee bit west of Charles Street as it runs through the heart of the city, I had a straight shot/view up through the CBD to the Washington Monument from my living room and dining room.
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 01:50 AM   #1478
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Heartbreaking news about 10 IH. Maybe itll flip back the other way and be the same height or taller? Please? Someone?
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 02:03 AM   #1479
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Ehe....I'm not a supertaller guy. We need some very talls. But this location isn't the one where it would look or operate best.

The old design wasn't especially exciting, or interesting. If they come back with something, eye-popping, that'll do a lot more for our skyline and out-of-towners perception than a few extra floors.

Quality, not quantity, is best in the long term.

In 30 years time, if we have 5 or 6 600-750 footers, I'd be fine with that if they all looked good. I don't feel the need to be NYC, Chicago, or Tokyo, Shanghai, Jakarta, and all those "new" Asian cities. I'd die happy and proud of Baltimore's downtown if that's all we ever got out of skyscrapers.

We definitely need more than now, but was anybody THAT enamored with the old design?!

Nate

Last edited by getontrac; March 2nd, 2007 at 04:50 AM.
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 02:45 AM   #1480
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Agreed. Good architecture beats height for this building. It will be very prominent on the skyline because of its location, not its height, so let's make it a good one! (No hats, please)

I thought this article makes a great recommendation as to how we can simultaneously fight crime/drug dealing in the city and revitalize distressed neighborhoods. I will be writing to both the author and to Sheila Dixon to support this measure!

Mike Mitchell: How to permanently revitalize Baltimore City neighborhoods

Mike Mitchell, The Examiner
Read more by Mike Mitchell
Mar 1, 2007 3:00 AM (16 hrs ago)
Current rank: # 607 of 19,075 articles

BALTIMORE - The house posed one of the greatest construction challenges we had ever tackled.


With three sides and an illegal addition, it needed work. It had also sat vacant for years, so everything was falling apart.

Thanks to a construction staff who handled the project with skill, the former eyesore stands as a beautiful new home. A Chesapeake Habitat homeowner occupies it — with 10 other Habitat homeowners living in or soon to move into homes nearby in Washington Village/Pigtown. As research and common sense shows they will help to create a more vibrant neighborhood with higher property values where residents care about their houses and neighbors.

While fixing homes is an important step in revitalizing neighborhoods, more forceful tools must be used to ensure newly refurbished neighborhoods stay that way. These public policy tools exist, but they will not make an impact unless Mayor Sheila Dixon decides to organize her agency resources to maximize them. Enforcing just one of them, the Drug Nuisance Abatement Law, has the ability to convert hazardous properties into livable homes and will help resolve the abandonment problem. But it will take Dixon, the Baltimore City police and the Housing Department to achieve this vision.

Under the Drug Nuisance Abatement Program neighbors and community associations can call police to report suspicious activity around a home.

If the police raid the home and find evidence of drug trafficking, the owner of the home can be brought to court under drug nuisance laws. A landlord may then be ordered to clean up the property and evict problematic tenants. If owners continue to disregard the law, their property can be seized, and if the property is abandone it can be redeveloped into affordable housing. Baltimore City enforces the law occasionally, but not consistently.

Cities that have made concentrated efforts to remove abandoned housing have seen dramatic reductions in the crime rates of affected neighborhoods. For instance, Richmond, Va., focused its effort on seven neighborhoods with high levels of abandoned homes. Within three years, crime dropped 19 percent in those areas, compared with falling 6 percent across the city.

We know small levels of disorder, such as an unrepaired broken window in an abandoned home, will eventually escalate into bigger issues and possibly to serious crime.

A study in Austin, Texas, found that blocks with abandoned buildings generated “3.2 times as many drug calls to police, 1.8 times as many theft calls, and twice the number of violent calls” as blocks without abandoned buildings. In addition, 12,000 fires break out in abandoned buildings nationally each year, most of which are the result of arson, causing 6,000 injuries to firefighters.

Researchers have found that homes 300 feet away from an abandoned property can lose nearly $7,000 in value. If one abandoned home can do this much damage to the surrounding property values, then an entire block of abandoned homes can destroy a neighborhood.

The issue of abandoned housing is vital to Baltimore, as the city has one of the highest rates of abandoned housing in the nation. Prior to Mayor O’Malley’s launch of Project 5000 in 2002, the city ranked fourth nationally in total number of abandoned properties, according to the 2000 U.S. Census. Through the program, the city has won titles to 6,100 abandoned properties and returned 1,000 properties or lots back to the marketplace.

Certainly, there are many ways to fight abandonment, such as fighting mortgage foreclosures and providing repair programs, but enforcing the Drug Nuisance Abatement Program has never been so necessary. Otherwise, other three-sided, formerly vacant homes being readied to grow the number of homeowners and the tax base will remind drug dealers that Baltimore is their home, not ours.

Mike Mitchell is the executive directors of Chesapeake Habitat for Humanity. He can be reached at [email protected].

http://www.examiner.com/a-592297~Mik...hborhoods.html
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