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Old March 7th, 2007, 10:45 PM   #1661
Javalady1
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Do you own Barista by any chance? The name made me think...
No. Think software...
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Old March 7th, 2007, 10:50 PM   #1662
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The real question is, why would you want a gate? Real cities don't work that way. It upsets me that that development has turned it's back so whole-heartedly on the street. And besides, who are you trying to keep out? Federal Hill residents?
I'm not from Baltimore and not familiar with Federal Hill when I came here. I didn't buy at Harborview for a gate and I certainly have no control over any developer (especially the one at Harborview). But I'll look for you when I'm making future decisions about my retirement investments.
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Old March 7th, 2007, 11:24 PM   #1663
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City picks Ray Lewis group as developer
Baltimore Business Journal - 2:18 PM EST Wednesday, March 7, 2007by Daniel SernovitzStaff

Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon tapped a development team including Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis to turn an 11-acre site in the city's Carroll Camden section of southwest Baltimore into a $200 million redevelopment site with offices, a recreational sports complex and retail space.

"The effort that has been put forth to make this project come together is overwhelming," said Lewis, who added the chance to create a home for his youth mentoring center at the site was one of the prime reasons he opted to take part in the project. "I'm trying to bring education and recreation together, to really give our kids in our city true hope again."


At the recommendation of the Baltimore Development Corp., the city's economic development arm which voted in December to back the project, Dixon picked Lewis's group over five others that also submitted proposals. Dixon made the announcement during a press conference at city hall Wednesday afternoon.

"This gateway initiative is really going to touch on many components of what the city wants to see down the road in the future," Dixon said.

The project area, which the city is calling Gateway South, is on Russell Street south of M & T Bank Stadium, north of Interstate 295 and I-95, and east of the Carroll Camden Industrial Park. M.J. "Jay" Brodie, president of the BDC, said it will cost the city about $13.3 million to acquire properties and prepare the site before selling it to Cormony for the project.

Lewis is an equity partner in the project, which is being led by Cormony Development. Cormony has proposed to build a 600,000-square-foot office building, a 35,000-square-foot Greyhound terminal to replace one it will be displacing as part of the project, 100,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space, and a 100,000-square-foot sports complex. The site will also include The Ray of Hope Center, a mentoring center Lewis has been planning to establish in the city once he found the right location.

"When you're blessed, you've got to give back ten-fold, and (Lewis is) a great example to many of us," Dixon said.

Sam Polakoff, managing director of Cormony, said he believes the project will greatly enhance the look of the area, which leads into the city from the Baltimore-Washington Parkway and from an exit off I-95.

"We've been given the opportunity to completely reshape and refine the southern gateway into the community," Polakoff said.

With Dixon's endorsement, Lewis and Cormony will now work with the city to finalize details of the plan and come up with a formal agreement. Brodie said he hopes the project's office space will combine with other projects, including the redeveloped Montgomery Park site and Canton Crossing, to make Baltimore City an even stronger sell for companies considering moving into the region.

"This is not the old industry of Baltimore, this is the new Baltimore of the 21st Century and this is going to be the calling card," Brodie said.
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Old March 7th, 2007, 11:24 PM   #1664
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Well, perhaps proposal was an inaccurate word. More like suggestion.
They were basicaly "shopping" the idea. And they had some very possitive feedback about it. Usually, some developer jumps on that opportunity as an invitation of some sort. Plus, I really like the idea of a high-rise on that spot intergrating the BCCC there as well, obviously.

A highrise on the BCCC site is an enormously long way off. The campus community went up in arms at the last Sun article. Check out the front page of www.bccc.edu which states that BCCC does not plan to sell its Harbor Campus Bard building. I no longer work for BCCC so I'm removed from what the community might have gotten up and arms about.

However, what you might see is a long beaucratic process like Lockwood that results in something far less than what is desired. However, maybe the new BCCC president will change my expectations. I expect BCCC to remain in that location, in some capacity. Most employees do recognize the problems with that building and many wouldn't mind seeing it imploded. Whether or not BCCC has the wherewithal to navigate the State (DGS) processes to demolish the building and redevelop the parcel remains to be seen. Though I look forward to the recommendations.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 12:54 AM   #1665
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Originally Posted by Javalady1 View Post
I'm not from Baltimore and not familiar with Federal Hill when I came here. I didn't buy at Harborview for a gate and I certainly have no control over any developer (especially the one at Harborview). But I'll look for you when I'm making future decisions about my retirement investments.
hehe, sorry. It's not your fault. Developers just get on my nerves sometimes. Always frustrating us poor architects. I guess it just comes with the territory.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 04:37 AM   #1666
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I drove by the Four Season Site and saw some construction equipment but most of the lot is still used for parking.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 05:29 AM   #1667
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I know. I don't understand some people's obsession with cities like Atlanta and Charlotte. If you've ever been to those places you'll notice that, other than their new somewhat generic high-rise buidings, they have no real urban fabric or street life. They're downtowns mostly consist of these clusters of really tall buildings surrounded by brutal, windswept, hardscape plazas, or even worse, parking lots. They're mostly for built for show as you're driving through the city at 70 mph on the interstate (the most common method of travel). Other than that, you have really low density single-use development, criss-crossed by 8-lane highways and separated by vast swaths of "no-mans land" kind of spaces. Quaint urban neighborhoods of any substance are seriously lacking, and for me, those are the kind of places that I want to live in. Not to mention that they're completely landlocked. Anyway, I should know since that's exactly why I moved to Baltimore from the southeast...and I'm supposedly part of the highly coveted "young creative class" that every city's been clamouring for lately.

Atlanta? Charlotte? Nashville?

NO THANKS. You can keep 'em.
It's interesting to hear your perspective. I've spent such a long time hearing about how great places like Atlanta and Charlotte are. When I visit though, I always have to bite my tongue and not say...."Where's the city?"...There's a bunch of tall buildings and lots of suburbs but not much that I think of as city. I've been brainwashed by cities like Baltimore, Philadelphia, NYC to think that cities should be dense and have neighborhood businesses and have places that you can walk to, etc. Many of the new cities in the south have lots of neighborhoods that don't even have sidewalks so it's right to the SUV to go anywhere. I love living in a place where I can go a couple days without driving, can walk to stores for food and drink and even have a neighborhood bookstore. I just would not make a good full scale suburbanite.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 05:39 AM   #1668
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A highrise on the BCCC site is an enormously long way off. The campus community went up in arms at the last Sun article. Check out the front page of www.bccc.edu which states that BCCC does not plan to sell its Harbor Campus Bard building. I no longer work for BCCC so I'm removed from what the community might have gotten up and arms about.

However, what you might see is a long beaucratic process like Lockwood that results in something far less than what is desired. However, maybe the new BCCC president will change my expectations. I expect BCCC to remain in that location, in some capacity. Most employees do recognize the problems with that building and many wouldn't mind seeing it imploded. Whether or not BCCC has the wherewithal to navigate the State (DGS) processes to demolish the building and redevelop the parcel remains to be seen. Though I look forward to the recommendations.
The State process is not only long, but will drift in the wind of politics, much like the WTC, which was for sale and now is not. My guess is that the State wouldn't let it go unless the buyer was going to build a comparable sized facility as part of a larger complex. The location and a downtown education facility is quite desirable; it just that building that isn't. A developer would have to find a way to make it profitable to build something that includes a community college that probably would expect low rents.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 06:12 AM   #1669
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scando View Post
It's interesting to hear your perspective. I've spent such a long time hearing about how great places like Atlanta and Charlotte are. When I visit though, I always have to bite my tongue and not say...."Where's the city?"...There's a bunch of tall buildings and lots of suburbs but not much that I think of as city. I've been brainwashed by cities like Baltimore, Philadelphia, NYC to think that cities should be dense and have neighborhood businesses and have places that you can walk to, etc. Many of the new cities in the south have lots of neighborhoods that don't even have sidewalks so it's right to the SUV to go anywhere. I love living in a place where I can go a couple days without driving, can walk to stores for food and drink and even have a neighborhood bookstore. I just would not make a good full scale suburbanite.
Scando, I couldn't agree with you more. So many of the cities of the south east and south west don't really feel like cities to me. Give me BALTIMORE, Philly, Boston (love that town) NYC, Chicago, DC etc. any day over Atlanta, Charlotte, Houston, Dallas, and the like. I mean really, Charlotte?? Is a city judged on its tall buildings? Have any of its champions been there?? I have, and to quote 'somebody' ( I can't remember who said this...) there's not much there there.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 06:21 AM   #1670
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Why does dude compare Baltimore with those southern cities instead of cities in this region. Baltimore is not part of the southeastern region also Baltimore is coming up?
Looks like you are among the other southerners that failed American History.

Maryland and DC will always be part of the South.

I would compare Baltimore to DC but there is one thing that DC has that other cities don't have and thats being the Nations Capital.

Maryland would be better off today if DC remain as part of Maryland.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 06:24 AM   #1671
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Originally Posted by MountVEE View Post
I know. I don't understand some people's obsession with cities like Atlanta and Charlotte. If you've ever been to those places you'll notice that, other than their new somewhat generic high-rise buidings, they have no real urban fabric or street life. They're downtowns mostly consist of these clusters of really tall buildings surrounded by brutal, windswept, hardscape plazas, or even worse, parking lots. They're mostly for built for show as you're driving through the city at 70 mph on the interstate (the most common method of travel). Other than that, you have really low density single-use development, criss-crossed by 8-lane highways and separated by vast swaths of "no-mans land" kind of spaces. Quaint urban neighborhoods of any substance are seriously lacking, and for me, those are the kind of places that I want to live in. Not to mention that they're completely landlocked. Anyway, I should know since that's exactly why I moved to Baltimore from the southeast...and I'm supposedly part of the highly coveted "young creative class" that every city's been clamouring for lately.

Atlanta? Charlotte? Nashville?

NO THANKS. You can keep 'em.
Getontrac is that you...........
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Old March 8th, 2007, 06:25 AM   #1672
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It's interesting to hear your perspective. I've spent such a long time hearing about how great places like Atlanta and Charlotte are. When I visit though, I always have to bite my tongue and not say...."Where's the city?"...There's a bunch of tall buildings and lots of suburbs but not much that I think of as city. I've been brainwashed by cities like Baltimore, Philadelphia, NYC to think that cities should be dense and have neighborhood businesses and have places that you can walk to, etc. Many of the new cities in the south have lots of neighborhoods that don't even have sidewalks so it's right to the SUV to go anywhere. I love living in a place where I can go a couple days without driving, can walk to stores for food and drink and even have a neighborhood bookstore. I just would not make a good full scale suburbanite.
You should be the next runner up for an Oscar.....
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Old March 8th, 2007, 06:31 AM   #1673
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Scando, I couldn't agree with you more. So many of the cities of the south east and south west don't really feel like cities to me. Give me BALTIMORE, Philly, Boston (love that town) NYC, Chicago, DC etc. any day over Atlanta, Charlotte, Houston, Dallas, and the like. I mean really, Charlotte?? Is a city judged on its tall buildings? Have any of its champions been there?? I have, and to quote 'somebody' ( I can't remember who said this...) there's not much there there.
Wow this line of acting is top notch.

Whats next, Baltimore has best Subway System in the world.

Or better yet the Orioles just won the World Series.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 06:42 AM   #1674
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Looks like you are among the other southerners that failed American History.

Maryland and DC will always be part of the South.

I would compare Baltimore to DC but there is one thing that DC has that other cities don't have and thats being the Nations Capital.

Maryland would be better off today if DC remain as part of Maryland.
It doesn't have that much to do with being part of the Confederate South. An accident of geography mainly spared us from that fate, even though I pass by statues of Lee and Jackson every day. Cities like Phoenix, LA, etc never were part of "The South" but are part of the mid 20th century car based suburban "cities". Cars won't last forever though and roads get worse each year so I get to gloat every day when I get to work and find exhausted co-workers grousing about their 1 1/2 hour commute when mine was 9 minutes. Maryland might better off with DC, but that water went over the dam about 200 years ago.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 06:45 AM   #1675
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Wow this line of acting is top notch.

Whats next, Baltimore has best Subway System in the world.

Or better yet the Orioles just won the World Series.
I'm not a good actor, my preference is a matter or personal preference and honestly I don't really care a whit whether you believe it or not. As for your other two statements, hope springs eternal. The O's have made it a couple times before and it didn't take as long as it did for Boston.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 07:12 AM   #1676
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I've been to Atlanta and I don't see it. I don't see what's so great about it. Like you guys said, there is no there. There is no cental downtown. No density. It all looks too planned. And what is so wonderful about Buckhead! It's certainly no Georgetown or Connecticut Ave. I bet they have some killer suburban neighborhoods. It helps to be a big media center. You can give yourself props all the time.

Charlotte is a wannabe city. You guys ever fly over it? There is nothing to it. It's downtown looks like Towson only with 2 tall skrapers.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 07:45 AM   #1677
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I've been to Atlanta and I don't see it. I don't see what's so great about it. Like you guys said, there is no there. There is no cental downtown. No density. It all looks too planned. And what is so wonderful about Buckhead! It's certainly no Georgetown or Connecticut Ave. I bet they have some killer suburban neighborhoods. It helps to be a big media center. You can give yourself props all the time.
Atlanta has its upsides, but overall its no DC or Baltimore. Buckhead (known as the "Beverly Hills of the South") is essentially 2 malls and some highrises. You can find the same levels of expensive shopping in the more urban environments of Georgetown, Chevy Chase and Bethesda. Living in Atlanta 7 months of the year isn't all bad, the clubs are intense and I've got a fake ID to get into them (I'm only 18 ).
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Old March 8th, 2007, 09:08 AM   #1678
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Originally Posted by k25150 View Post
I've been to Atlanta and I don't see it. I don't see what's so great about it. Like you guys said, there is no there. There is no cental downtown. No density. It all looks too planned. And what is so wonderful about Buckhead! It's certainly no Georgetown or Connecticut Ave. I bet they have some killer suburban neighborhoods. It helps to be a big media center. You can give yourself props all the time.

Charlotte is a wannabe city. You guys ever fly over it? There is nothing to it. It's downtown looks like Towson only with 2 tall skrapers.
Ah....density!!! Would you rather be here...a few talls surounded by parking lots...


or here...a dense city with a vibrant downtown?

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Old March 8th, 2007, 09:09 AM   #1679
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It doesn't have that much to do with being part of the Confederate South. An accident of geography mainly spared us from that fate, even though I pass by statues of Lee and Jackson every day. Cities like Phoenix, LA, etc never were part of "The South" but are part of the mid 20th century car based suburban "cities". Cars won't last forever though and roads get worse each year so I get to gloat every day when I get to work and find exhausted co-workers grousing about their 1 1/2 hour commute when mine was 9 minutes. Maryland might better off with DC, but that water went over the dam about 200 years ago.
So basically your saying that Maryland is better off being anti-Business/Growth while NOVA continues to reap from the Business Growth within the last few decades that is now employing well over 50% of the Maryland Commuters and Ranked the number 1 Employment Mecca of the Mid-Atlantic.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 09:12 AM   #1680
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I've been to Atlanta and I don't see it. I don't see what's so great about it. Like you guys said, there is no there. There is no cental downtown. No density. It all looks too planned. And what is so wonderful about Buckhead! It's certainly no Georgetown or Connecticut Ave. I bet they have some killer suburban neighborhoods. It helps to be a big media center. You can give yourself props all the time.

Charlotte is a wannabe city. You guys ever fly over it? There is nothing to it. It's downtown looks like Towson only with 2 tall skrapers.
I DARE YOU ACTORS to go to the SouthEast Thread and post this if you Really Believe the Bull Shit that your stating.
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