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Old January 18th, 2007, 09:46 AM   #1
LouisvilleJake
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Lafayette/West Lafayette, IN, Development News

Why the hell not? Lafayette is one of the faster growing communities in Indiana and it is a city that definitely has a special place in my heart.

Renaissance Place: What it is

Renaissance Place is a three-building development in downtown Lafayette.

It consists of the 140,000-square-foot Lafayette Bank & Trust Co. Building, which has six stories above ground and a basement; and an adjacent 92,000-square-foot, five-story structure that features retail and restaurant space on the first floor and four stories of residential condominiums.

A 310-space parking garage also has been built on the site.

Through a purchase agreement, the bank occupies 52,000 square feet within the building at 250 Main St. that bears its name and has an additional 20,000 square feet of space available for future growth.

Future occupants of the LB&T Building will include the commercial division of F.C. Tucker Lafayette/Realtors and a fitness club, which will be located in the basement and hopes to open by April.

Tenants that have been secured for the retail-condo building on the west end of the block include a sit-down restaurant, an upscale pool hall and several office users.

Formal announcements of those tenants and other potential clients will be announced on Feb. 7, during the annual State of Real Estate sponsored by F.C. Tucker/Lafayette Realtors.

A Downtown Renaissance
Journal & Courier


Five years after plans for Renaissance Place were first revealed, business is being conducted in a portion of the $25 million development.And work is continuing on retail and residential space in the project that sits in the heart of downtown Lafayette.

"Both our customers and our employees are very happy with the new location. It's everything we expected, and more," said Tony Albrecht, president and chief executive officer with Lafayette Bank & Trust Co. The bank is the project's first occupant.

Renaissance Place covers a square block bounded by Second, Third, Main and Ferry streets. The property previously included a two-story building that was torn down and a large parking area.

"It sure has changed the landscape," said Joe Bumbleburg, an attorney who had a bird's-eye view of the construction from his eighth-floor office in the adjacent Chase Bank building. "We looked out over a parking lot that was sometimes a festival site. Now it's all full.

"It is an attractive building. The construction sometimes screwed up production at our place. We spent a lot of time just watching the guy that ran the crane and put in the steel and slabs of concrete. He had the hands of a surgeon."

Earlier this week, Lafayette Bank & Trust, which was founded in 1899 and has 100 employees, completed a one-block move into the building at 250 Main St. The bank moved from its headquarters at Fourth and Main streets, an adjacent building and a drive-up banking facility a few blocks north at Fourth and North streets.

"We've picked up a building that makes it easier for customer access, via the parking garage we have at our disposal," said Albrecht. "It's already made our employees more efficient. We're in a condensed area. Most of the employees are physically more accessible to each other. "And from a confidentiality standpoint, this is an improvement for our clients when they're at the bank working with us."

A ribbon-cutting ceremony for Lafayette Bank & Trust, sponsored by the Lafayette-West Lafayette Chamber of Commerce, will be held Monday. A series of receptions for clients, business partners and community leaders will be scheduled in February.

The public first learned about Renaissance Place during the 2002 State of Real Estate, an annual update on the Greater Lafayette commercial and residential market, presented by F.C. Tucker/Lafayette Realtors.This year's State of Real Estate will be held Feb. 7 at Renaissance Place.

"I'm pleased. It's been a long, tough project. It's essentially done now," said Doug Mennen, president of Wex-ford Development LLC, which created the project. "I'm happy with it. I think it looks good. The contractors and the city have been great to work with. It's been a team effort."

Nineteen of the 36 condos in the second building have been sold and the first residents could be moving in by the end of February. "We're finishing out some units and hope to have a model up and running by next month," said Roberta Levy of F.C. Tucker/Lafayette Realtors. Levy is handling sales of the condos, which are designed to allow the owner to decide how the living space will be furnished.

"What's nice about that is that no two are going to be alike. Some people are putting in hardwood floors, some ceramic floors. It's really a very interesting idea."Prices for the remaining condos range from $238,000 to slightly more than $300,000.

Sean Richards owns Murky Waters, a coffee shop that sits across Main Street from Renaissance Place.He expects business to increase once people start living in the condominiums, working in the offices and shopping at the retail stores that will be part of the project.

"We've been anxiously awaiting it since they broke ground," Richards said. "I think it will definitely help the street traffic, and that will help us. I live downtown, and I'm really pleased with what's been done there.




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Old January 18th, 2007, 09:56 AM   #2
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U.S. 231 bypass plan stumbles on utility moving cost

It's likely the state will delay building the first section of a U.S. 231 bypass, says a state spokesman.

Debbie Calder of the Indiana Department of Transportation said difficulties over moving utilities have made delay likely. The state had intended to build a new part of U.S. 231 from South River Road to Indiana 26 this year.

But the cost of moving utilities along the route of the proposed U.S. 231 bypass, particularly those near the Purdue University airport, has turned out to be greater than the state expected.

Joe Mikesell, the Purdue senior director of engineering, utilities and construction, said the state had taken steps to purchase right of way from Purdue for the bypass. Then Purdue submitted an estimate on how much it will cost to move utilities out of the way of the new route.

"That's when things ground to a halt," he said. "And we found out through other channels that there was a budget problem."

Mikesell said the state likely had not taken into account how many utilities would have to be moved under its plans. If the bypass is not to interfere with planes coming from the airport, it can't be built over Airport Road and a set of railroad tracks, both of which lie in its path.

The state has thus planned to make a large cut in the ground and sink the road inside so it will go underneath the obstacles. That arrangement will entail moving more utilities than if the bypass were built at ground level, Mikesell said.

"The initial estimates appear to have been made on the assumption that there wasn't to be this large cut," he said.

David Buck, the West Lafayette city engineer, said West Lafayette officials had hoped to save money on a new sewer line by building it at the same time as the state built the U.S. 231 bypass. The delay may cause them to change their plans slightly, although he thinks there is a chance the two projects can still occur simultaneously.
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Old January 18th, 2007, 02:45 PM   #3
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How much does Purdue influence L/WL construction and economic acitivity? which of the two communities benefits most?
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Old January 18th, 2007, 04:21 PM   #4
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The planners in the Lafayette area are doing a great job focusing developmnet/redevelopment downtown. It is tough for small cities like Lafayette, Anderson and Muncie to get any significant investment downtown because those cities are so auto-oriented. However, with Purdue (and you would think Ball State for Muncie), Lafayette/West Lafayette just may prove successful like Bloomington.
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Old January 18th, 2007, 09:08 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwilson758 View Post
The planners in the Lafayette area are doing a great job focusing developmnet/redevelopment downtown. It is tough for small cities like Lafayette, Anderson and Muncie to get any significant investment downtown because those cities are so auto-oriented. However, with Purdue (and you would think Ball State for Muncie), Lafayette/West Lafayette just may prove successful like Bloomington.
I can certainly see good things are happening in Lafayette, but wouldn't Bloomington continue to have an edge over Lafayette because the IU campus directly runs into its downtown? IMHO, its the accessibility to downtwon from campus that really helps some of the great B10 college towns (Iowa City, Madison, Evanston, Bloomington, Ann Arbor)
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Old January 19th, 2007, 03:04 AM   #6
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I never thought I would see the day a Lafayette/West Lafayette developement thread would take shape. For those of you who are not familiar with the area, I did a photo thread from pictures I took a couple of years ago as a student. Here is the link:

http://skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=370729

From what I've been keeping up with in the Journal and Courier, the most exciting urban projects (other than Renaissance Place) are taking place between Purdue and N/S River Rd. Here's one I've been more excited about.

October 1, 2006
Headquarters below, apartments above
JOURNAL & COURIER

A large retail and residential complex is slowly working its way skyward in West Lafayette's Village.

Construction began a few months ago on the $25 million Chauncey Square development along North Chauncey Street.

To be the new headquarters for its owner, Fleischhauer Rentals, the building will provide 15,000 square feet of retail space on the first floor, topped by four stories of apartments.

"We're currently working on the foundation for phase II," said Fleischhauer general manager Andy Kingma. Phase I is still just a hole in the ground.

Workers are constructing the building around the schedule of the city's efforts to refurbish several underground utility lines in the area.

WHEN

Construction began in July. Kingma expects to begin placing structural steel in November. The entire project is slated for completion by August 2007.

WHERE

102 N. Chauncey St., or basically the entire block bound by Chauncey, Columbia, Salisbury and South streets.

WHAT'S INSIDE

The five-story building will include 128 apartments and first floor space for up to eight business tenants. It will also have a 480-space parking garage.

Fleischhauer Rentals will move into one of the business spaces. Two restaurants already have indicated their intent to open, but Kingma is witholding their identities for now.

THE IMPACT

With Purdue University experiencing a shortage of on-campus housing this fall due to one of the largest freshman classes in its history, the development will provide additional housing near campus.

— Curt Slyder/[email protected]

journalandcourier.com
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Old January 20th, 2007, 05:34 PM   #7
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Quote:
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I can certainly see good things are happening in Lafayette, but wouldn't Bloomington continue to have an edge over Lafayette because the IU campus directly runs into its downtown? IMHO, its the accessibility to downtwon from campus that really helps some of the great B10 college towns (Iowa City, Madison, Evanston, Bloomington, Ann Arbor)
I agree. One thing that should help DT Lafayette is that the Wabash River flows right through there and is good-sized. That adds for some interesting views that aren't in DT Bloomington.
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Old January 20th, 2007, 08:33 PM   #8
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Nice photo spread, araman. That fountain at Purdue reminds me of a short, squat version of the "chopstick" war memorial in Singapore.

I've actually never been to downtown Lafayette. The problem with this city is that its principal gateway corridors, like all too many in Indiana, are fairly generic and ugly commercial strips. The US 52 bypass may be the most depressing road I've ever driven down.

I think there's big opportunity in Lafayette. Purdue has really stepped it up as an institution. If Lafayette can gain some synergies with the Indianapolis area (which is only an hour away) I think there's a lot economic development potential.
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Old March 4th, 2007, 11:05 AM   #9
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2 new hospitals, 1 question: Will health care get better?




Economics, reimbursement rates and surgeon contracts are the last things on patients' minds when they seek medical attention.

Sandy Formica wasn't thinking about any of that last month when she learned that she needed surgery for a defect in her heart.

But she started to when she realized that those issues would force her to travel to Indianapolis to have surgery with her cardiac doctor, Dr. Kenneth Stone.

"It would have been much more convenient if St. Elizabeth (Medical Center) would have allowed Dr. Stone to operate here," Formica said. "I could make the trip, but there are people who are a lot sicker than I was at that point. ... I was just very disappointed."

Stone is at the center of an ongoing conflict between Arnett HealthSystem and Greater Lafayette Health Services, organizations that once worked hand-in-hand but now are building competing hospitals.

The rivalry heated up in late January when GLHS, which owns St. Elizabeth and Home Hospital, ended a long-standing relationship with Arnett and contracted with an Indianapolis cardiology group for open-heart surgery.

Stone, an Arnett heart surgeon since 1988, was told he could no longer do open-heart in either Lafayette hospital.

Although Stone and his patients are feeling the adverse impact of the rivalry now, there are positive long-term effects, some believe. Within two years, Lafayette could have two new hospitals featuring state-of-the-art technology and directly linked to much larger health organizations in Indianapolis.

New hospitals

Arnett's crews on Wednesday will place the final steel beam on the 103-bed, $170 million Clarian Arnett Hospital, which is being built in partnership with Clarian Health Partners Inc. of Indianapolis. Anticipated opening is fall 2008.

GLHS, which is part of Mishawaka-based Sisters of St. Francis Health Services Inc., will begin construction of a 166-bed, $190 million hospital this spring with plans to finish it in 2009.

Both hospitals will feature private patient rooms, wireless equipment and convertible trauma rooms that will replace the traditional one-size-fits-all spaces.

"Competition is going to make us better," said Dr. Michael Skehan, Arnett's president and chief executive officer.

"We think competition drives the providers in town to improve the access, enhance the choice and improve the quality."

Terry Wilson, president and CEO of Greater Lafayette Health Services, is less sanguine about competition.

"The fact that (Arnett is) poised to take 40-some-percent of the patients out of our hospitals and take them to their own for-profit hospital within two years from now has an enormous impact on the viability of our hospitals.

"What they're doing has at the base of it the potential to close these two hospitals," he said, referring to Home and St. Elizabeth.

Consensus lacking

Bob Morr, vice president of the Indiana Hospital and Health Association, said the prevailing public policy since the 1980s is that competition is good in health care -- as it is in other sectors of the economy.

"Whether that holds true over time has yet to be determined. Does competition lower costs or lower the increase in cost and improve quality, or does it raise costs and lower quality? We don't know that yet," he said.

Morr said there's no consensus on the competition issue among leaders of the state's 170 hospitals. But new hospital and medical center construction has been prevalent in recent years without resulting in many closures, except in areas of declining population.

And while there's some concern over Arnett adding a for-profit hospital to the community that's been served for 130 years by the not-for-profit GLHS hospitals, Morr said his group has not seen any difference in the "breadth of services or the commitment to the community" in areas with both types of hospitals.

Skehan is confident the hospital competition will be good for the community, but he said it would be better if done in tandem with collaboration on specialty, lower-volume services.

Wilson said he tried to collaborate with Arnett until the physicians decided to build their own hospital. Also, he said attempts by two hospitals to work together to "divide up the market" might violate federal antitrust regulations.

Patients' views

John Strubel of Rossville just wants to see the two sides reach some sort of agreement.

"Competition is good for industries and everything, but I guess when you get to the medical profession there should be some sort of way to get along," he said.

Karla Bahler of Wolcott agreed, saying, "I wish they wouldn't be so political."

Strubel believes patients care most about having a good relationship with their doctor -- wherever the physician is.

He said hospital leaders should spend more time figuring out ways to get the best care for patients in a local setting, so that residents don't think they must go to Indianapolis or elsewhere for quality care.

Some patients weren't sure how it would work when Dr. Bob Kolla and a team of heart surgeons with the Indianapolis-based CorVasc group took over cardiac care at GLHS.

Kolla, who has moved to Lafayette and is house hunting, has been doing heart surgery for 14 years. He is backed up by other CorVasc surgeons who come to Lafayette when he is not on duty.

Wilson said the hospitals signed with CorVasc to ensure the continued success of the GLHS heart program. He declined to elaborate because of litigation. Stone sued GLHS in early February, claiming breach of contract.

Craig Dobbins, 56, of West Lafayette was scheduled for bypass surgery Feb. 6. He had to make a decision quickly about having surgery at St. Elizabeth or going with Stone to Indianapolis.

Either way, there were unknowns.

"We decided to do it here because it was more conven-ient," he said.

Dobbins is feeling well and doesn't think the quality of medicine has suffered from the hospital conflict. But, he said, "It would be nice if the people could get along better than they seem to be getting along."

Creating a team

Kolla is staying above the fray of the cardiac care debate and is focusing on putting his stamp on the heart program at GLHS.

"I was looking to get to a place that could see a next generation of heart care," he said. "The (hospital) people here have embraced the ideas I've brought ... and that's the basis for creating a team."

He and other physicians will help design the new hospital, ensuring that the facility is streamlined for patients' care and speedy recovery.

Similarly, Dr. James Bien, chief medical officer at Arnett Clinic, is looking forward to the efficiency and modern technology anticipated at the new Arnett hospital and existing medical centers.

"It's much more than just a new building," he said. "We're trying to create an integrated system of care."

Morr said there are no clear answers yet on how the hospital competition will play out.

Many other doctors, and residents, are hopeful that the current strife will produce better medical care in the long run.

"Time will tell," Morr said. "Does the competition serve the citizens well or not? The free market answer is that the market will dictate."

'Something's got to be done'

For the family of Gary Payne, those answers will come too late. Payne, 61, had a heart attack in his Lafayette home on Jan. 26 and was stabilized at St. Elizabeth.

Stone, the family's surgeon of choice, told them he couldn't do the surgery in Lafayette and ultimately was too busy to do the procedure at all.

So Payne transferred to Indianapolis on Jan. 30 to have surgery with a physician recommended by Stone.

Payne never made it to surgery. After developing an infection, he died Feb. 7, said his mother, Della Payne.

Through it all, Payne's family members struggled to stay by his side, 60 miles from home.

"It was horrible going back and forth, and especially in this weather," Della Payne said.

The night before Gary died, Interstate 65 was partially shut down due to a winter storm, and the family had to take a lengthy detour to reach Indianapolis.

The situation left a bad impression that will stay with the family for years, Della Payne said.

"Something's got to be done about health care here in Lafayette," she said.
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Old March 4th, 2007, 11:25 AM   #10
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Just wait (till 2026) for Ind. 26 repairs

Without improvements soon, county planning officials fear Indiana 26 on the east side of Lafayette will become plagued with potholes and heavier traffic.

The Indiana Department of Transportation's long-range project list puts improvements of Indiana 26 off until at least 2026, about 50 years after the road was last paved.

"There is a lot of congestion there," said Doug Poad, Tippecanoe County Area Plan Commission senior transportation planner. "But not only is congestion the problem, the condition of the pavement is."

Poad and John Thomas, APC assistant director for transportation, said they will ask county and city leaders to put pressure on INDOT to move the project up the list.

"They need to know that putting off construction of 26 until 2026 is too far down the line," Thomas said. "We're going to have gridlock."

Thomas said traffic is expected to increase from about 44,000 cars a day now to 55,000 by 2030, and the road's condition will deteriorate.

He said drivers can expect more potholes, bumps, accidents and longer drive times.

The INDOT plan calls for adding two lanes to Indiana 26, lengthening turn lanes, adding more turn lanes and improving intersections between Interstate 65 and Sagamore Parkway. Residents and businesses along the road said that work is badly needed.

"Oh no, we need it now," said Joyce Lamberson of Lafayette when she heard INDOT's time frame. "We've got big potholes now."

Thomas and Poad said the intersection at Sagamore Parkway is usually listed as the most dangerous in the county. Before changes were made at Creasy Lane, that intersection was in the top five.

Douglas Snouwaert, a manager at Game X Change on Indiana 26, said the road produces a lot of accidents.

"It seems like there's quite a bit of sirens," he said. "I definitely notice a lot of accidents."

Jenny Bonner, Lafayette city engineer, said she's looking forward to working with regional officials to ask INDOT to move the project up the list.

"The capacity on that road is exceeded already. It's needed widening for a while," Bonner said. "We're only going to grow. I can't see how much more traffic can go on that road."

INDOT creates a project importance list for major projects based on a complex equation that includes a number of factors: cost effectiveness, the highway's importance, amount of congestion, the amount of accidents, jobs created and input from local officials.

Debbie Calder, INDOT's Crawfordsville spokeswoman, said no one was available Friday to say how or if a project could be moved up the list of importance.

Thomas said it would be almost impossible to get the work started before 2016 because eight projects are already in the works or being planned for the county before then.

But INDOT has no major projects slated for Tippecanoe County between 2016 and 2020. If that doesn't work, Thomas said he'll ask INDOT to put one of the Interstate 65 widening projects in the area on hold to get the Indiana 26 project done between 2021 and 2025.

Businesses along Indiana 26 said the road's condition likely doesn't keep customers away. But Kurt Curry, a Lafayette resident, said he tries not to drive there.

"In the afternoon it's terrible," Curry said. "I avoid it at all costs."
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Old March 4th, 2007, 08:33 PM   #11
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Its been almost a year since my last trip to my beloved Lafayette, but I do remember the Arnett hospital is going out by 500E and McCarty. Do you know where the Greater Lafayette Health Services hospoital is going or if there are any renderings available?

As far as 26 goes, I agree that its in great need of imrpovement, especially for how important the road is to Lafayette. I really like the visual improvements they made to 52 North of 26 during my last year at Purdue in 2005. Right now, 26 needs these types of visual improements far greater than capacity increases.
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Old March 10th, 2007, 08:14 PM   #12
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Crews top off Arnett's skeleton



Crews top off Arnett's skeleton
Skehan: It will be wonderful

By DOROTHY SCHNEIDER
[email protected]

Construction crews finished the skeleton of the new Clarian Arnett Hospital Wednesday during a ceremony attended by medical and political leaders.

Dozens gathered to watch the final steel beam, adorned with signatures and flags, be placed atop the $170 million hospital-in-progress at the intersection of McCarty Lane and County Road 500 East.

But while Dr. Michael Skehan, Arnett's president and CEO, acknowledged the milestone, he said his vision for a regional health system will not revolve around the four-story building.

"We're going to concentrate on not just putting people in the hospital," he said. "It will be a wonderful building and a wonderful system."

The new Clarian Arnett Hospital, a collaboration between the local Arnett HealthSystem and Clarian Health Partners of Indianapolis, is set to open in fall 2008.

Meanwhile, Greater Lafayette Health Services plans to begin this spring to build its own new hospital on Creasy Lane, between McCarty Lane and Indiana 38. The new facility will replace Home Hospital and St. Elizabeth Medical Center.

Dozens of Arnett and Clarian staff members attended Wednesday's beam placing ceremony and were joined by local leaders, including state Sen. Ron Alting, R-Lafayette, Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski and West Lafayette Mayor Jan Mills.

Skehan said the hospital will be a focal point -- especially since it will be visible from the nearby Interstate 65 -- but only one element of the medical care Arnett HealthSystem will provide across the region.

With the final beam in place, construction crews with F.A. Wilhelm of Indianapolis will spend the next few months enclosing the structure.


Ken Wilson, who oversees the mechanical, electrical and plumbing at the site, said some of the building's glass exterior will start going up next month. He said once the structure is enclosed, likely by October, the building's heating and cooling systems will be in place and work will continue regardless of the weather.

Alting applauded Clarian and Arnett for building what he said is a "first-class, world-class hospital. ...

"We're happily and graciously awaiting the opening."
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Old March 10th, 2007, 08:17 PM   #13
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Its great to see so much life and development in Lafayette! I used to live there, and it feels much larger than 50'000 people.
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Old March 11th, 2007, 03:01 AM   #14
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Well, add to that WL alone which has nearly 30k, and then all the Purdue students which don't get counted in Greater Lafayette's population statistics since they are technically still residents of their own hometowns, and we have well over 100k. Then, there are all the people who live in subdivisions outside the city limits, and you end up with a fairly sizable area.

Density always helps to make a place look bigger too, and last time I checked West Lafayette was still up there among the densest (if not the densest) city in Indiana, with Lafayette being denser than most as well, especially around the inner city.
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Old March 11th, 2007, 04:43 AM   #15
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Isn't the IU med school in Indy the only public med school in state? Has there ever been talk of a med school for Purdue? Purdue may be unusual for a school of its caliber for not having either med or law schools. I realize it is the land grant in state, but its most similiar Big Ten peer, MSU, has both.
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Old March 11th, 2007, 07:41 AM   #16
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IU and Purdue do a good job of not having overlapping specialty programs. Indiana doesn't have an engineering school, for example. Purdue would be well advised to focus on doing what it currently does even better, as opposed to trying to be all things to all people.
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Old March 11th, 2007, 12:43 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
Isn't the IU med school in Indy the only public med school in state? Has there ever been talk of a med school for Purdue? Purdue may be unusual for a school of its caliber for not having either med or law schools. I realize it is the land grant in state, but its most similiar Big Ten peer, MSU, has both.
I think IU has the medical schools, but there are new branches all around Indiana.

From http://www.medicine.iu.edu/body.cfm?id=225&oTopID=225

"Following admission to the IU School of Medicine, a freshman may be assigned to one of the following centers:

* IUSM-Medical Sciences Program at Indiana University, Bloomington

* IUSM-Evansville at the University of Southern Indiana

* IUSM-Fort Wayne at Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne

* IUSM-Lafayette at Purdue University

* IUSM-Muncie at Ball State University

* IUSM-Northwest at Indiana University Northwest

* IUSM-South Bend at the University of Notre Dame

* IUSM-Terre Haute at Indiana State University"

The acronyms for these are awful! "I attend IUSMBSatUND..." hahahaha


BUT, I dont think any other university in the state has a medical school; The University of Southern Indiana was gunning last year for an engineering school (in addition to Purdue) but I don't know what came of that.
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Old March 11th, 2007, 02:29 PM   #18
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Has the line between liberal arts/med/law etc. at IU and engineering/agriculture/tech related field, etc. at Purdue become more blurred as it has at such institutions as U-M and MSU?

I would imagine it has. Isn't there far more overlap in curricula at Indiana's two flagship public universities than ever before?

and, if so, couldn't even a law school become part of the Purdue mix along with medicine if the need arises?
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Old March 12th, 2007, 08:54 AM   #19
LouisvilleJake
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Purdue is also home to the state's Veterinarian School and the state's main School of Pharmacy.

Purdue will never have a med school or a law school - those are the realm of IU, and IU serves those needs perfectly well for the state.

Likewise, IU will not have an engineering program, pharmacy program, or veterinary program - Purdue serves those needs well.

Both schools need to focus on their respective strengths and not get too much overlap. Both schools offer a liberal arts education - but IU has the much stronger reputation in that field.
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Old March 12th, 2007, 01:29 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LouisvilleJake View Post
Purdue is also home to the state's Veterinarian School and the state's main School of Pharmacy.

Purdue will never have a med school or a law school - those are the realm of IU, and IU serves those needs perfectly well for the state.

Likewise, IU will not have an engineering program, pharmacy program, or veterinary program - Purdue serves those needs well.

Both schools need to focus on their respective strengths and not get too much overlap. Both schools offer a liberal arts education - but IU has the much stronger reputation in that field.
Is it safe to say the following:

• Indiana's two flagship public universities are more peer-like in their ranking than most states? IU and Purdue have similiar academic reputations?

• Michigan's flagships, U-M and MSU, offer far more curriculum overlap than IU and Purdue do?
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