daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments > DN Archives



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old May 5th, 2007, 11:29 PM   #1241
Tag_one
Registered User
 
Tag_one's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Nieuwegein/Holland
Posts: 695
Likes (Received): 6

Quote:
Originally Posted by NittanyBLUE2002 View Post
Definitely liked the black renderings. Someone else asked about a two-tone combo with black structuring and silver windows. That'd be interesting.

BTW, is there some sort of architectural rule that says all new glass buildings are required to project glimmering shades of bright blue or emerald green?

Glass is without a doubt the perfect exterior for the Spire, but I hope Chicago doesn't get "too glassy." I just love the raw power and classic clean designs of masterpiece 'scrapers like the Sears Tower, John Hancock and Aon Center. There is something to be said for purity and simplistic design, but the Spire truly blows my mind. Sure hope to see Calatrava's dynamic vision come to full fruition in the Windy City.
There's not really a rule or something. But it's the same as clothing and cars, colors and styles change all the time. At the moment bright blue and green are very hot.
Tag_one no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old May 6th, 2007, 12:40 AM   #1242
NoX
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 14
Likes (Received): 1

This building IS GONNA beautify Chicago!

And to those people who still believe a Squarish skyline with straight cuts is the true beauty..... Go play LEGO...
NoX no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2007, 03:20 AM   #1243
alsajano
Turista Virtual
 
alsajano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Bárcena PC
Posts: 2,322
Likes (Received): 0

Can have an affaire between the Chicago Spire and the Smurfit-Stone?

Quote:
Originally Posted by VikkyD View Post
Loved number 3.... with the flat roof.. this latest version is.. great, but... slightly more phallic. and... eh.
__________________
Bastante perdido.
alsajano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2007, 09:26 AM   #1244
FastFerrari
I double dog dare you!!!
 
FastFerrari's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: San Antonio, Texas - USA
Posts: 707
Likes (Received): 32

so wats the latest news on the spire....saw pics like the were ready to start excavation or drilling foundation holes....any city meetings or advertisments...pics....gimmie sumthan guys..
FastFerrari no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2007, 04:13 PM   #1245
Kngkyle
Registered User
 
Kngkyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Orlando
Posts: 610
Likes (Received): 21

Quote:
Originally Posted by FastFerrari View Post
so wats the latest news on the spire....saw pics like the were ready to start excavation or drilling foundation holes....any city meetings or advertisments...pics....gimmie sumthan guys..
Nothing stopping you from getting "sumthan" yourself. If you would have read the past couple pages you would know that the final approval is on May 9th. As for information, try searching Google news. http://news.google.com
Kngkyle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2007, 05:51 PM   #1246
Adrian Smith fan
BANNED
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 505
Likes (Received): 18

just 3 more days
__________________

Zefire liked this post
Adrian Smith fan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2007, 06:28 PM   #1247
exit_320
Registered User
 
exit_320's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 749
Likes (Received): 1

Tall building with a twist
Calatrava design carries Chicago's lofty aspirations
By WHITNEY GOULD
[email protected]
Posted: May 5, 2007

In its various incarnations, it has been likened to a drill bit, a swirling ball gown, a soft-serve ice cream cone, a licorice Twizzler and a birthday candle. Whatever metaphor you choose, Santiago Calatrava's proposed Chicago Spire is a twisting, shimmering symbol of both the Windy City's downtown renaissance and its global aspirations.

An artist's rendering shows the 2,000-foot spire, which would be the tallest building in North America if Spanish-born architect Santiago Calatrava's plan comes to fruition.

Architect Santiago Calatrava makes a presentation of his design of the Chicago Spire to the City of Chicago Planning Commission on April 19.

Buy a link hereAt 2,000 feet, the 150-story skyscraper would be the nation's tallest building, eclipsing Chicago's own 1,450-foot Sears Tower and muscling into the ranks of the world's most stratospheric towers in advance of the 2016 Olympics, which Chicago hopes to host.

Having cleared several bureaucratic and neighborhood hurdles, the proposal will go before the City Council on Wednesday.

Whether the vertiginous spire actually gets built - on a former dump site west of Navy Pier, where the Chicago River meets Lake Michigan - is another matter. Some Chicagoans are skeptical, noting that the developer, Garrett Kelleher of the Dublin-based Shelbourne Development Group Inc., has yet to reveal details about costs or financing.

Some real estate sources estimate construction costs could approach a staggering $2.4 billion. An earlier iteration of the building, floated by a different developer in 2005, failed to win financing. But city officials are upbeat.

"We have every reason to believe it will be built," says Connie Buscemi, a spokeswoman for Chicago's Department of Planning and Development.

The developer has said he expects to start construction this year, with completion by 2010.

"We have had more inquiries than we have condos," said Kim Metcalfe, a spokeswoman for Kelleher. She said that nibbles for the 1,200 living units are coming from as far away as Belarus, England, Ireland and Sweden.

Kelleher will put up 30% of the equity financing himself, with the Anglo Irish Bank taking the lead for 70%, an arrangement that is common in Europe, Metcalfe said.

A burst of new housing
The spire would become the instant star in a dizzying constellation of new housing development. For each of the last seven years, Chicago has built an average of 4,000 new condos and apartments downtown.

"And we expect the same level for the next several years," says Benet Haller, the city's director of urban design and planning.

Millennium Park, a sweeping downtown green space filled with blockbuster architecture and public art, is a major catalyst, sparking a projected $1.4 billion worth of residential development between the time the park opened in 2004 and 2014, according to a study for the city by real-estate consultants.

In this metropolis where the modern skyscraper was born 122 years ago, most of the new units are in tall buildings, including 40 towers of 50 stories or more built since 2000. Mayor Richard M. Daley, known for his emphasis on "green" architecture, has pushed developers to build taller and skinnier to promote density in the fight against sprawl and encourage innovative design. Calatrava's spire will incorporate numerous green features, including special glass to protect migratory birds and a system to recycle rainwater for landscaping.

"We want to be known not only for the history of the skyscraper but for cutting-edge architecture," Haller says.

Some in the design community, however, are less enthusiastic about the quality of many skyscrapers of recent vintage. "We built a lot of really ugly buildings very quickly," says architect Joe Valerio, a former Milwaukeean. Valerio thinks even the Calatrava spire would have been more elegant in its original, thinner guise, which had a drill-bit-like spire. (A second version was less tapered and had an almost flat top, which no one much liked.)

'Light and fluid' landmark
Still, the current version - slightly thicker, and softly tapered like a birthday candle, with each floor rotating slightly above the one below it - is winning mostly raves.

"It's the right building for this era: light and fluid and of landmark quality," says Philip Enquist, an architect with Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, the firm that designed Chicago's two tallest buildings from an earlier time, the Sears Tower (1974) and the John Hancock Center (1970). "It goes along with the Olympic wave," Enquist said, referring to the U.S. Olympic Committee's recent designation of Chicago as the American city that will bid for the 2016 Summer Games.

Donna Robertson, dean of the College of Architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology, says the tower will continue Chicago's "history of courageous architecture" and solidify Calatrava's presence in the Midwest. His only other commission in the region is his bird-in-flight addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum (2001).

"Now there will be a synergy for people coming to see a cache of Calatrava's work," Robertson says.

Even new urbanists, who generally prefer small-scale, street-friendly architecture over look-at-me showstoppers, have been won over.

"We're delighted any time you can get lots of people living close together," says former Milwaukee Mayor John O. Norquist, now CEO of the Chicago-based Congress for the New Urbanism.

Residents of Streeterville, the neighborhood where the tower will be located, worry about the project's traffic impact. But with primary access off Lake Shore Drive, not local streets, that problem should be eased, according to Haller, the planner.

Norquist credits Streeterville activists with helping to improve Calatrava's design, which originally envisioned a building somewhat cut off from its site and soaring above a plinth-like parking garage. Now the garage will be underground and the transparent, cathedral-like lobby of the building will overlook a public plaza. The developer has also pledged $9 million to create a 3-acre park just to the east.

"It's an example of how community agitators who take design seriously can make a building better," Norquist said.

Lingering nervousness
In the background of all the buzz about the spire is a lingering, post-9/11 nervousness: Could the tower become a target for terrorists?

"Any work of iconic architecture could be seen as a terrorist target," admits Antony Wood, executive director of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. "But the corrective for that is to address the causes of terrorism," not to shrink from the urge to test the limits of human achievement with soaring buildings.

Besides, Wood says, Calatrava's tower won't remain the nation's tallest for long. "Someone," he says, "is probably making plans for an even taller one right now."

On JSOnline To see a video of Santiago Calatrava's Chicago Spire, click on www.jsonline.com/links
exit_320 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2007, 06:42 PM   #1248
pgold21
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 33
Likes (Received): 0

What's the music in the video? I think I saw it mentioned on another site but I can't find the link now. Anyone know it?
pgold21 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2007, 07:27 PM   #1249
ZZ-II
I love Skyscrapers
 
ZZ-II's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Near Ingolstadt in Bavaria
Posts: 33,504
Likes (Received): 6525

great video, but the music....no notion which orchestra that can be
ZZ-II no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2007, 08:44 PM   #1250
Frumie
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 717
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by pgold21 View Post
What's the music in the video? I think I saw it mentioned on another site but I can't find the link now. Anyone know it?
The music is Anton Dvorak's Symphony No. 9 "From the New World," the adagio movement.
__________________
You truly want peace? Be righteous.
Frumie no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2007, 01:34 AM   #1251
chicagogeorge
Registered User
 
chicagogeorge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: South suburban Chicago
Posts: 5,284
Likes (Received): 893

Quote:
Originally Posted by exit_320 View Post

Whether the vertiginous spire actually gets built - on a former dump site west of Navy Pier, where the Chicago River meets Lake Michigan - is another matter. Some Chicagoans are skeptical, noting that the developer, Garrett Kelleher of the Dublin-based Shelbourne Development Group Inc., has yet to reveal details about costs or financing.

Some real estate sources estimate construction costs could approach a staggering $2.4 billion. An earlier iteration of the building, floated by a different developer in 2005, failed to win financing. But city officials are upbeat.

"We have every reason to believe it will be built," says Connie Buscemi, a spokeswoman for Chicago's Department of Planning and Development.

The developer has said he expects to start construction this year, with completion by 2010.

"We have had more inquiries than we have condos," said Kim Metcalfe, a spokeswoman for Kelleher. She said that nibbles for the 1,200 living units are coming from as far away as Belarus, England, Ireland and Sweden.

Kelleher will put up 30% of the equity financing himself, with the Anglo Irish Bank taking the lead for 70%, an arrangement that is common in Europe, Metcalfe said.
Tomorrow the city council approves this project no doubt........Then we find out if Kelleher will use the European method of financing this tower by put his money down and getting financing without pre-construction sales......If this is to be believed, than we will witness the greatest skyscraper project in Chicago history. Actually scratch that, possibly the greatest the world has ever seen.
__________________

for the Pelasgians, too, were a Greek nation originally from the Peloponnesus
The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...assus/1B*.html

Macedonia, of course, is a part of Greece". Strabo, VII, Frg. 9
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...ragments*.html

But north of the gulf, the first inhabitants are Greeks called Epirotes....
Procopius
http://books.google.com/books?id=9m6...page&q&f=false
chicagogeorge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2007, 03:05 AM   #1252
Johnnydemattos
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 85
Likes (Received): 0

I still can´t believe they´ll build this thing. That shape looks very tricky, are there any building early stages pictures?

AMBITIOUS!
Johnnydemattos no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2007, 03:42 AM   #1253
Kngkyle
Registered User
 
Kngkyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Orlando
Posts: 610
Likes (Received): 21

Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagogeorge View Post
Tomorrow the city council approves this project no doubt........Then we find out if Kelleher will use the European method of financing this tower by put his money down and getting financing without pre-construction sales......If this is to be believed, than we will witness the greatest skyscraper project in Chicago history. Actually scratch that, possibly the greatest the world has ever seen.
Not tomorrow, Wednesday.
Kngkyle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2007, 03:57 AM   #1254
LosAngelesMetroBoy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Baghdad/Miami/Los Angeles
Posts: 317
Likes (Received): 26

not to rain on anyones parade or anything, i think its a cool project, just looks like a giant 2000 foot tall *****
LosAngelesMetroBoy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2007, 04:27 AM   #1255
Hanshin-Tigress
BANNED
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: 和歌山市(Wakayama);Orlando
Posts: 1,744
Likes (Received): 110

Quote:
Originally Posted by LosAngelesMetroBoy View Post
not to rain on anyones parade or anything, i think its a cool project, just looks like a giant 2000 foot tall *****
There are twisting dildos?? jk
__________________

Zefire liked this post
Hanshin-Tigress no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2007, 04:34 AM   #1256
wickedestcity
BANNED
 
wickedestcity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,566
Likes (Received): 26

heres the direct link : http://www.brightcove.com/title.jsp?title=769453130
__________________

Zefire liked this post
wickedestcity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2007, 06:25 AM   #1257
madeinttown
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 9
Likes (Received): 0

id like to see the glow in the dark version render. anyone up to the task? the first glow in the dark scyscrapper! and no, 'lighted' buildings dont count. its facade has to be made of the limish plastic stuff.
madeinttown no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2007, 05:38 PM   #1258
Green Jello
Registered User
 
Green Jello's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Chicago, IL U.S.A.
Posts: 356
Likes (Received): 23

Article from a Milwaukee paper this weekend:

http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=601629

Quote:
Tall building with a twist
Calatrava design carries Chicago's lofty aspirations
By WHITNEY GOULD
[email protected]
Posted: May 5, 2007

In its various incarnations, it has been likened to a drill bit, a swirling ball gown, a soft-serve ice cream cone, a licorice Twizzler and a birthday candle. Whatever metaphor you choose, Santiago Calatrava's proposed Chicago Spire is a twisting, shimmering symbol of both the Windy City's downtown renaissance and its global aspirations.

An artist's rendering shows the 2,000-foot spire, which would be the tallest building in North America if Spanish-born architect Santiago Calatrava's plan comes to fruition.

Architect Santiago Calatrava makes a presentation of his design of the Chicago Spire to the City of Chicago Planning Commission on April 19.

At 2,000 feet, the 150-story skyscraper would be the nation's tallest building, eclipsing Chicago's own 1,450-foot Sears Tower and muscling into the ranks of the world's most stratospheric towers in advance of the 2016 Olympics, which Chicago hopes to host.

Having cleared several bureaucratic and neighborhood hurdles, the proposal will go before the City Council on Wednesday.

Whether the vertiginous spire actually gets built - on a former dump site west of Navy Pier, where the Chicago River meets Lake Michigan - is another matter. Some Chicagoans are skeptical, noting that the developer, Garrett Kelleher of the Dublin-based Shelbourne Development Group Inc., has yet to reveal details about costs or financing.

Some real estate sources estimate construction costs could approach a staggering $2.4 billion. An earlier iteration of the building, floated by a different developer in 2005, failed to win financing. But city officials are upbeat.

"We have every reason to believe it will be built," says Connie Buscemi, a spokeswoman for Chicago's Department of Planning and Development.

The developer has said he expects to start construction this year, with completion by 2010.

"We have had more inquiries than we have condos," said Kim Metcalfe, a spokeswoman for Kelleher. She said that nibbles for the 1,200 living units are coming from as far away as Belarus, England, Ireland and Sweden.

Kelleher will put up 30% of the equity financing himself, with the Anglo Irish Bank taking the lead for 70%, an arrangement that is common in Europe, Metcalfe said.
A burst of new housing

The spire would become the instant star in a dizzying constellation of new housing development. For each of the last seven years, Chicago has built an average of 4,000 new condos and apartments downtown.

"And we expect the same level for the next several years," says Benet Haller, the city's director of urban design and planning.

Millennium Park, a sweeping downtown green space filled with blockbuster architecture and public art, is a major catalyst, sparking a projected $1.4 billion worth of residential development between the time the park opened in 2004 and 2014, according to a study for the city by real-estate consultants.

In this metropolis where the modern skyscraper was born 122 years ago, most of the new units are in tall buildings, including 40 towers of 50 stories or more built since 2000. Mayor Richard M. Daley, known for his emphasis on "green" architecture, has pushed developers to build taller and skinnier to promote density in the fight against sprawl and encourage innovative design. Calatrava's spire will incorporate numerous green features, including special glass to protect migratory birds and a system to recycle rainwater for landscaping.

"We want to be known not only for the history of the skyscraper but for cutting-edge architecture," Haller says.

Some in the design community, however, are less enthusiastic about the quality of many skyscrapers of recent vintage. "We built a lot of really ugly buildings very quickly," says architect Joe Valerio, a former Milwaukeean. Valerio thinks even the Calatrava spire would have been more elegant in its original, thinner guise, which had a drill-bit-like spire. (A second version was less tapered and had an almost flat top, which no one much liked.)
'Light and fluid' landmark

Still, the current version - slightly thicker, and softly tapered like a birthday candle, with each floor rotating slightly above the one below it - is winning mostly raves.

"It's the right building for this era: light and fluid and of landmark quality," says Philip Enquist, an architect with Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, the firm that designed Chicago's two tallest buildings from an earlier time, the Sears Tower (1974) and the John Hancock Center (1970). "It goes along with the Olympic wave," Enquist said, referring to the U.S. Olympic Committee's recent designation of Chicago as the American city that will bid for the 2016 Summer Games.

Donna Robertson, dean of the College of Architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology, says the tower will continue Chicago's "history of courageous architecture" and solidify Calatrava's presence in the Midwest. His only other commission in the region is his bird-in-flight addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum (2001).

"Now there will be a synergy for people coming to see a cache of Calatrava's work," Robertson says.

Even new urbanists, who generally prefer small-scale, street-friendly architecture over look-at-me showstoppers, have been won over.

"We're delighted any time you can get lots of people living close together," says former Milwaukee Mayor John O. Norquist, now CEO of the Chicago-based Congress for the New Urbanism.

Residents of Streeterville, the neighborhood where the tower will be located, worry about the project's traffic impact. But with primary access off Lake Shore Drive, not local streets, that problem should be eased, according to Haller, the planner.

Norquist credits Streeterville activists with helping to improve Calatrava's design, which originally envisioned a building somewhat cut off from its site and soaring above a plinth-like parking garage. Now the garage will be underground and the transparent, cathedral-like lobby of the building will overlook a public plaza. The developer has also pledged $9 million to create a 3-acre park just to the east.

"It's an example of how community agitators who take design seriously can make a building better," Norquist said.
Lingering nervousness

In the background of all the buzz about the spire is a lingering, post-9/11 nervousness: Could the tower become a target for terrorists?

"Any work of iconic architecture could be seen as a terrorist target," admits Antony Wood, executive director of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. "But the corrective for that is to address the causes of terrorism," not to shrink from the urge to test the limits of human achievement with soaring buildings.

Besides, Wood says, Calatrava's tower won't remain the nation's tallest for long. "Someone," he says, "is probably making plans for an even taller one right now."
Also contained this video:
http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=599062
Green Jello no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2007, 11:47 PM   #1259
CrazyAboutCities
Registered User
 
CrazyAboutCities's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Seattle, Washington
Posts: 8,549
Likes (Received): 240

Love the video!

If "someone" is possibly making the plan for next tallest one... I wonder where it would get built... Chicago? New York City? or else?
CrazyAboutCities no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2007, 11:55 PM   #1260
Green Jello
Registered User
 
Green Jello's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Chicago, IL U.S.A.
Posts: 356
Likes (Received): 23

Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyAboutCities View Post
Love the video!

If "someone" is possibly making the plan for next tallest one... I wonder where it would get built... Chicago? New York City? or else?
Obviously the smart money is on Dubai. They just seem to want to compete with themselves.
Green Jello no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
chicago, santiago calatrava, spire, tallest, tower

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu