daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old March 8th, 2009, 07:51 PM   #461
Robosteve
Registered User
 
Robosteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 376
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
What's with the double shoulder marking? The roads look very well maintained though.
That isn't really a shoulder at all, but a bicycle lane. I think the double marking is to provide a bit of a gap between the cars moving at 100 km/h and bicycles which would obviously move much more slowly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Little tip; zoom the camera a bit in, usually 2x is already enough to not get the interior on it. The problem is that it might focus on the interior or the windshield instead of the landscape/road.
Oh, thanks. I'll try that next time.
Robosteve no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old March 8th, 2009, 09:37 PM   #462
Timon91
Error
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: just outside Germany
Posts: 5,783
Likes (Received): 46

How do they do that with the bike lane at an exit? As a bicyclist, do you just have to watch out for traffic and cross the exit lane in order to stay on the motorway bike lane?
__________________
My Flickr account.
Some of my photoseries: Northern Ireland, Prague, Boston, Alaska part 1, 2, 3, Smoggy Moscow, Warsaw, Wrocław, Kiev, Donetsk, Odessa and Chişinău.
Timon91 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 8th, 2009, 10:55 PM   #463
KIWIKAAS
Registered User
 
KIWIKAAS's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The Hague
Posts: 4,520
Likes (Received): 750

It's pretty weird but many freeways/motorways in Australia have bicycle access. To be fair you don't see many foolhardy folks using them.
Here's an example on Sydney's M7. Funny enough there is also a cycle way which runs the full length of the motorway as well as access to the motorway itsself.

KIWIKAAS no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 8th, 2009, 11:30 PM   #464
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,591
Likes (Received): 19378

In my opinion, there shouldn't be cycle paths directly on the road with a speed limit over 50 km/h.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 8th, 2009, 11:36 PM   #465
Timon91
Error
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: just outside Germany
Posts: 5,783
Likes (Received): 46

On my way to school I use a road where the speed limit is 60, and there is no separated bike path, but just a red strip on either side of the road. There is one small part, however, where the speed limit is 80, so there are separated bike paths on either side of the road.

Of course, a separate bike path is always better, but there is very little traffic on that road on my way to school, so it's not really a problem.
__________________
My Flickr account.
Some of my photoseries: Northern Ireland, Prague, Boston, Alaska part 1, 2, 3, Smoggy Moscow, Warsaw, Wrocław, Kiev, Donetsk, Odessa and Chişinău.
Timon91 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 8th, 2009, 11:40 PM   #466
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,591
Likes (Received): 19378

Yeah, 60 should be not much of a problem too, but I think in the Netherlands they set 50 as a limit for cycle paths on the main roadway. Kinda stupid because most rural roads are 60 km/h with few traffic.

I believe cycling is legal in some U.S. States on Freeways too. Kinda stupid.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2009, 04:56 AM   #467
Verso
Islander
 
Verso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ljubljana
Posts: 22,087
Likes (Received): 4749

Great pics!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Timon91 View Post
How do they do that with the bike lane at an exit? As a bicyclist, do you just have to watch out for traffic and cross the exit lane in order to stay on the motorway bike lane?
Here's a good example (incidentally it's also the Princes Highway ). Not everything is perfectly visible, but we can see a bike drawn on the hard shoulder (bicycle lane), a blue sign with bike and that white sign saying "bicycle crossing ahead", and the way you cross the entrance ramp - the shortest way, in width.
Verso no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2009, 07:02 AM   #468
Robosteve
Registered User
 
Robosteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 376
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
Here's a good example (incidentally it's also the Princes Highway ). Not everything is perfectly visible, but we can see a bike drawn on the hard shoulder (bicycle lane), a blue sign with bike and that white sign saying "bicycle crossing ahead", and the way you cross the entrance ramp - the shortest way, in width.
Yeah, I've seen those signs before. I've often thought they'd be quite dangerous; the speed limit on that section of road is 80 km/h so you have traffic accelerating down that ramp wanting to merge into moderately high speed traffic.

Just an aside about that picture; that's the northern terminus of the F6, facing south (you can see the sign indicating that it diverges from Old Princes Highway). For some reason, the northern half of the F6 is called Princes Highway, but the southern half is separate from the Princes Highway.

Anyway, if you look between the carriageways, you can see a reserve for the freeway to continue into the Sydney metropolitan area - it was initially planned to go all the way to the CBD, but the innermost land has now been put to other uses. However, considering that this part of the F6 was built in 1975 without extension in either direction since then, I don't think we're going to see any new sections built anytime soon.
Robosteve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2009, 06:23 PM   #469
Robosteve
Registered User
 
Robosteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 376
Likes (Received): 1

Image set: Mount Ousley Road - Wollongong to Bulli Tops

Date: Sunday, 8th March, 2009
Time: 17:00 (approx.)

Route (15.9 km):


Total images for this route: 18

--------------------

1. Climbing the steep ascent out of Wollongong.



2. Further up the road.



3. A (very blurry) "Trucks & Buses Use Left Lanes" sign.



4. It's amazing that they managed to fit a 2x3 road through this steep terrain.



5. Mount Keira Lookout signage.



6. Picton Road (State Route 88) trumpet. SR88 is one of several east-west routes connecting the Hume and Princes Highways.



7. We continue straight on National Route 1, with 73 kilometres to Sydney. Annoyingly, our signage makes no distinction between destinations that are directly on the road ahead and those which are along other routes; Sutherland and Sydney lie directly on route 1; Appin and Campbelltown, however, are on SR69.



8. Further along Mount Ousley Road.



9. The Illawarra Escarpment has some great scenery.



10. This picture is too blurry for you to see the sign clearly, but the speed limit here is 100 km/h.



11. Lots of trees around this area.



12. This is a very pleasant drive.



13. Approaching a TOTSO, which is particularly annoying as the only reason it's a TOTSO is because of the way they painted the lane markings on the road. (In case it's too blurry to read, that sign says "Sydney / via NR1 / left lane / 2km")



14. NR1 exits to the left, SR69 begins here if you continue straight.



15. This picture was so blurry I tried to apply image sharpening to improve visibility, but it didn't work out too well. Nonetheless, you can just make out a new lane starting on the left up ahead. I don't understand why they didn't just make the new lane start on the right so that the two NR1 lanes would stay as NR1.



16. We take the NR1 exit towards Sydney. SR69 is a beautiful drive, but there just isn't time to drive all around Sydney in a day.



17. A very blurry freeway entrance. The speed limit on this section of F6 is 110 km/h.



18. On the northern part of the F6, where I put the camera down for a while again.




I've got one more image set to post, which is the biggest of them all, so I'll leave that for another day.
Robosteve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2009, 06:26 PM   #470
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,591
Likes (Received): 19378

I get a bit claustrofobic feeling by that road. Maybe it's because of the concrete barriers, trees and lack of a shoulder and further obstacle distance. I often have this feeling too in Belgium and Italy. Kinda like subjective traffic safety.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2009, 06:42 PM   #471
Verso
Islander
 
Verso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ljubljana
Posts: 22,087
Likes (Received): 4749

It does make a bit claustrophobic feeling (but only if you drive fast, I suppose), but the scenery is therefore absolutely brilliant!
Verso no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2009, 04:56 AM   #472
Robosteve
Registered User
 
Robosteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 376
Likes (Received): 1

Image set: MR6/MR5/MR1/SR29 - Heathcote to Forestville

Date: Sunday, 8th March, 2009
Time: 18:00 (approx.)

Route:


Total images for this set: 91

Some of these pictures are very blurry, particularly after the first few as the camera's battery died and I had to take pictures with my mobile phone instead. The weather didn't help towards the end, either, so I apologise for the blurriness, particularly in the last twenty or so pictures.


1. Let's take a more scenic route than the Princes Highway through southern Sydney. This is the start of Metroad 6, Sydney's newest metroad route, which at its southern extremity is known as Heathcote Road. The road we are turning off is still the Princes Highway, but is now Metroad 1 instead of National Route 1, and has a speed limit of 50 km/h.



2. Somewhat blurry distance sign, as well as an "End Roadwork" sign despite there being no sign of any roadworks anywhere. I see a lot more "Roadwork Ahead" and "End Roadwork" signs than I do actual roadworks these days.



3. Heathcote Road starts as 2+2.



4. Now it narrows to 1+1.



5. Another very scenic road.



6. Metroad 6 is one of only four Sydney metroads to still have sections of 1+1, the other three being MR2, MR3 and MR9.



7. Now we get 2+1 to climb this slope. Hopefully one day they'll build a high-level bridge over this area to connect the Princes Highway with the 2x2 section of New Illawarra Road, which we will drive on a bit later.



8. A bit further up the hill.



9. Approaching the first of several TOTSOs along the route of MR6.



10. The TOTSO itself.



11. MR6 is now known as New Illawarra Road.



12. New Illawarra Road is a fairly typical example of an Australian highway.



13. Passing the Lucas Heights nuclear research centre.



14. Heading towards Menai.



15. 60 km/h speed limit for the Menai area.



16. Personally, I don't think important thoroughfares should have roundabouts at minor junctions, but I suppose I could consider myself lucky I don't live in the UK.



17. This is where the new 2x2 splits off from the old 1+1. The new road was built as part of the Bangor Bypass project, and is planned to be extended further south in the next few years. Apparently, it's very important to remind people which direction they are travelling on this part of the road.



18. Bangor Bypass signage on the new road.



19. This section of 2x2 is quite a nice road, but you would think they would build a pedestrian bridge instead of having pedestrian traffic signals on a road like this.



20. The end of the new road, where it joins the existing Alfords Point Road. You can see signage for Menai Town Centre here, which is strange as this is within the Sydney metropolitan area, so you'd think it would simply be signed "Menai".



The above sign has the top cut off because there's a bit of a delay between pressing the "Capture" button on my phone and it actually taking the picture; there are a few more cases of this happening in later pictures, too.

Last edited by Robosteve; March 13th, 2009 at 06:20 AM.
Robosteve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2009, 05:20 AM   #473
Robosteve
Registered User
 
Robosteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 376
Likes (Received): 1

21. Alfords Point Road has a median consisting of two white lines painted on the road.



22. But it's surrounded by some nice greenery.



23. Passing under a local access road.



24. Descending towards the newly duplicated Alfords Point Bridge.



25. The bridge itself.



26. We are on the old bridge; southbound traffic uses the new one. This road used to be 2+1, with the middle lane switching direction depending on time of day; now it's 2x(2+e).



27. The northern approach is still single carriageway, but a second carriageway is soon to be built.



28. Further up the northern approach.



29. Grade separated interchange with a local road.



30. Now back to 2x2, but with a 70 km/h limit (it was 80 before).



31. I was trying to get a distance sign here, but by the time my phone took the picture I was past it. Still, here you can see that this section of MR6 (Davies Road) has properties fronting onto it, an annoyingly common feature of Sydney's arterial routes.



32. Further along Davies Road.



33. MR5 motorway (M5) signage on what is now Fairford Road (still MR6).



34. We want to turn right onto the M5.



35. Waiting for a green light.



36. On the M5 motorway itself.



37. An exit ramp.



38. Sydney is now just 22 kilometres away. One good thing about Sydney's signage is that many major roads have signage to the airport, even when quite far away from it.



39. Approaching the MR3 junction, which was once the eastern terminus of the M5 motorway - MR5 used to simply make a left turn and become a duplex with MR3 for a while. For some reason, the MR3 shield on this sign is not coloured blue.



40. 1km until the exit, with D5 now signed as well as MR3. D5 is a detour route for vehicles too high for the M5 tunnel.

Robosteve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2009, 05:43 AM   #474
Robosteve
Registered User
 
Robosteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 376
Likes (Received): 1

41. The MR3 exit itself, which is where the M5 used to end.



42. Passing under King Georges Road on the relatively new M5 east.



43. Speed limit 90 km/h.



44. The M5 east.



45. 18 km to Sydney.



46. Approaching a right hand exit.



47. 80 km/h speed limit.



48. The exit itself.



49. The entrance to the M5 tunnel, with 16 km to go until we reach central Sydney. You can see the bicycle lane turning off the motorway here; bicycles are not allowed in the tunnel.



50. Inside the M5 tunnel, which along with the westbound tunnel makes Australia's longest twin road tunnels (4.6 km long, I think).



51. Very blurry reassurance sign in the tunnel. I don't really see the point of a reassurance sign here; there has been no opportunity to exit since the last distance sign.



52. Approaching the Princes Highway exit, which by this point has become SR66 - perhaps in reference to the fact that it was once supposed to run parallel to the F6 freeway.



53. SR66 Princes Highway exit.



54. Airport exit signage.



55. The end of the M5 tunnel.



56. Bridge over the Cooks River.



57. With 12 km to Sydney, we enter another, much shorter tunnel.



58. "Sydney" signage has now been superseded by "City" signage.



59. 70 km/h speed limit, for some reason. This isn't a lowered speed limit to accommodate special conditions; the limit here is always 70.



60. The end of MR5, and also the end of the motorway. We are, in fact, on the orbital, but about 7 km of the orbital is not officially classified as motorway or freeway.

Robosteve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2009, 06:07 AM   #475
Verso
Islander
 
Verso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ljubljana
Posts: 22,087
Likes (Received): 4749

Great pics again! It really feels like driving through forests all the time. Though, it comes to mind, are there many traffic accidents on such high-speed roads in Australia, involving wild animals running sudenly from forests onto the roads?
Verso no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2009, 06:08 AM   #476
Robosteve
Registered User
 
Robosteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 376
Likes (Received): 1

61. Entering the Airport tunnel on MR1 General Holmes Drive. This tunnel passes directly under the North-South Runway, and if you're lucky when you drive past here you can sometimes see planes taking off or landing.



62. Whichever moron designed this overhead signage deserves to be shot. It gives the mistaken impression that the third lane carries traffic onto MR1 to the city, which is incorrect; only the left two lanes do that.



63. The beginning of Southern Cross Drive (which now carries the MR1 route), while General Holmes Drive provides access to the airport.



64. On Southern Cross Drive, where twin viaducts carry it over General Holmes Drive and Mill Pond Road.



65. Further along Southern Cross Drive, we have been joined by another lane where traffic from the airport enters the road via Mill Pond Road.



66. More of Southern Cross Drive.



67. This is one of the nicest parts of the orbital to drive on, even though it is not officially a freeway.



68. There used to be an at grade junction in this vicinity, which was removed around the time the Eastern Distributor was built so that the orbital would be free-flowing.



69. Signage indicating the start of the Eastern Distributor.



70. The left two lanes here become South Dowling Street, and the right lanes become Eastern Distributor. MR1 follows the Eastern Distributor.



71. Entering the first and very short Eastern Distributor tunnel. The orbital becomes a motorway again here.



72. Redfern / Bondi exit.



73. This part of the Eastern Distributor is constructed as a cutaway section in the middle of South Dowling Street.



74. More of the cutaway roadway.



75. And a bit further along.



76. The entrance to the main Eastern Distributor tunnel, which is a double decker tunnel. We are entering the top deck; to the right in this picture is where the lower deck exits the tunnel southbound.



77. Inside the Eastern Distributor tunnel. The exit seen here provides access to the Cross City Tunnel westbound and to William Street eastbound.



78. Approaching the toll plaza for the Eastern Distributor. The overhead viaduct carries a railway line.



79. The end of the Eastern Distributor, where it connects seamlessly onto the Cahill Expressway. There is a land bridge overhead.



80. We have finally reached Sydney CBD, pictured here from the Cahill Expressway.


Last edited by Robosteve; March 13th, 2009 at 06:13 AM.
Robosteve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2009, 06:32 AM   #477
Robosteve
Registered User
 
Robosteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 376
Likes (Received): 1

81. Inside the Domain Tunnel. This was Sydney's first motorway tunnel, construted using the cut and cover method in the early 1960s.



82. Sydney Harbour Tunnel (still MR1).



83. Exiting the Harbour Tunnel onto the Warringah Freeway (MR1).



84. Welcome to Australia's widest freeway; a total of sixteen lanes at its widest point.



85. This signage is unfortunately too blurry to read, but I thought I'd post it anyway as it shows just how many lanes there are to sign for.



86. Signage indicating the Miller Street exit (formerly SR26, now has no route number).



87. Miller Street exit.



88. We take the Brook Street exit.



89. Waiting for a green light on Brook Street.



90. Flat Rock Drive, a section of 2+2 connecting Brook Street with Alpha Road. This was built at the same time as the second section of the Warringah Freeway in the late 1960s as a temporary solution to the increase in traffic flow the freeway was expected to bring. As the freeway was never completed, this 2+2 (along with a couple of parallel streets) is now a permanent solution to the traffic brought to this area by a 2x5 freeway.



91. On the Roseville bridge, part of Warringah Road (SR29). This high-level 2x3 bridge connects Chatswood and the city with Forestville, Frenchs Forest and Terrey Hills. It is one of only two road bridges across Middle Harbour, the other being a four lane drawbridge that the government claims to be too expensive to upgrade or widen.



That's all for now, but I've been taking some odd pictures here and there when I've been on the bus and such that I'm going to organise and post sometime.
Robosteve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2009, 06:47 AM   #478
Robosteve
Registered User
 
Robosteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 376
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
Great pics again! It really feels like driving through forests all the time. Though, it comes to mind, are there many traffic accidents on such high-speed roads in Australia, involving wild animals running sudenly from forests onto the roads?
I don't think so. There are some highways which are notorious for generating a lot of roadkill, but mostly I think the busier highways have enough traffic noise to scare wild animals away before they get near the road.

It is of concern in more remote areas, though; I drove to Canberra and back once in the middle of the night, and while I took the limited access 2x2 highway to get there, I came back via a more scenic route, involving 1+1 highways with no shoulders and 100 km/h speed limits. Fortunately nothing happened, but if a kangaroo jumps in front of you in a situation like that, you don't really have much hope of avoiding it.
Robosteve no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2009, 06:36 PM   #479
Verso
Islander
 
Verso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ljubljana
Posts: 22,087
Likes (Received): 4749

^ Thank god we don't have kangaroos here. I didn't know there was a two-storeyed tunnel in Australia, are there any more? I remember a project for building a two-storeyed tunnel, but I'm not sure, if in Australia.
Verso no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2009, 07:52 PM   #480
Robosteve
Registered User
 
Robosteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney
Posts: 376
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
I didn't know there was a two-storeyed tunnel in Australia, are there any more? I remember a project for building a two-storeyed tunnel, but I'm not sure, if in Australia.
I don't think there are any others. Interestingly, that tunnel was originally planned as a surface motorway, but by the time they came to build it there were too many NIMBYs to build it on the surface. The only way they could fit a 2x3 motorway underground in that area was to put one carriageway on top of the other.

It's not exactly a two-storey tunnel, but the two carriageways of the Cross City Tunnel cross over each other halfway; traffic actually drives on the right in the western half, but you don't realise it because you're in a tunnel. The reason for this is so that it can connect with the existing Western Distributor ramps.

Interestingly, the Cross City Tunnel passes under or over (I don't know which) the two-level Eastern Distributor tunnel, so at that point you have three underground motorway levels, plus William Street on the surface, so four road levels total.
Robosteve no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
australia, highways, motorways, roads

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 04:36 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium