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Old May 16th, 2015, 02:23 PM   #1061
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PACIFIC HIGHWAY – WOOLGOOLGA TO BALLINA, NORTHERN NSW

The last piece of the puzzle for the Pacific Highway is almost underway and it is being done in one hit!
The 155 km Woolgoolga to Ballina will be upgraded to four lane divided highway to complete the dual carriageway between Sydney and Brisbane upon completion in 2020.
The consortium Pacific Complete, consisting of Laing O’Rourke and Parsons Brinkerhoff, is contracted as the preferred delivery partner to upgrade the highway. This part of the highway is part of $5.64 billion being pumped into the Pacific Hwy by the Australian and NSW Governments over the next five years.
Currently, nearly 400 km of the Pacific Hwy from Hexham to the Queensland border is completed dual carriageway. A further 120 km is currently being upgraded to dual carriageway including from Port Macquarie, around Kempsey and Nambucca Heads, to Urunga; and north of Ballina to the Byron Bay turnoff.

Australian Government’s Pacific Highway upgrade website: http://investment.infrastructure.gov...ichighway.aspx
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Old May 19th, 2015, 02:09 PM   #1062
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I was looking into the Bruce Highway upgrade near Gympie. It struck me how expensive this is, a 8.4 km section of motorway near Gympie will cost $ 624 million. That's nearly $ 75 million per kilometre through rural terrain. Now I understand it needs quite some flood mitigation, but it's a lot of money.


Another section nearby from Cooroy to Federal cost $ 590 million for 13.5 km of motorway. That's $ 44 million per kilometre. That area seems to be more hilly, but perhaps they could twin most of the existing Bruce Highway.

I found some local articles for you if you're interested that might help to explain the high cost of infrastructure projects in Australia. I don't think there is a single reason but many small reasons that all add up. One article I found compares Australia to France.


Why do roadworks cost so much?
The Age, 3 August 2014

About $800,000 for a roundabout and $21 million to widen a road. How can building and improving roads be so hideously expensive?

Construction costs are inflated by high bidding costs and poor financial transparency, federal assistant Infrastructure Minister Jamie Briggs was quoted this week in advance of an industry round-table discussion on the best ways to tackle the problems.

According to a recent leaked Infrastructure Australia report, road expenditure in Australia is notoriously inefficient and roads agencies lack intimate knowledge of roads systems, resulting in frequent cost overruns.

A former VicRoads employee said the roads agency has been deskilled to the point where there are too few experienced engineers to properly assess tenders submitted by private construction companies. Doug Harley, who was manager of network modelling at VicRoads, left the agency last year after three decades, over differences of opinion regarding the cost benefits of East West Link.

Because tenders are selected almost solely on their price, he said, private companies submit cheap tenders, and then later start adding variations that end up inflating the final price well above the original quote.

However, contractors who frequently work for VicRoads say such a scenario is unlikely. Allan Williams, operations manager at regular VicRoads contractor Bitu-mill, said any road construction business that engaged in under-quoting and then over-claiming on variations would be risking future contracts. “It’s a small industry, and your reputation and your ethics come into it when you tender, not just price. You’re only as good as your last job, and companies that did that may come unstuck next time they put in a tender.”

People are often ignorant of what it costs to build a road or install a roundabout, Mr Williams said. "When you see a noticeboard for a road project and it says $5 million, that includes a lot of costs apart from the construction - it also covers the cost of design, the site investigation, relocation of services, environmental plans, traffic management, even the costs of putting together the tender."

Costs are also boosted by high community expectations regarding environmental and safety issues, he said, with continual improvements in worksite safety and procedures meaning upfront costs are greater. "In order to protect the personal safety of the general public and of road workers, a road construction project might need to include concrete barriers, worksite diversions, traffic management and project methodology - and that all costs.”

Civil engineer and transportation expert Professor William Young, from Monash University, said competition with the mining industry can be blamed to a large extent for the high costs of road construction in Australia.

"Labour costs here are three or four times higher in Australia than in England, for instance," he said.

Competing with the mining industry pushes up the prices of materials as well as labour.

While the Infrastructure Australia report suggested the nation's "addiction" to road building meant spending is inefficient and unaccountable, it acknowledged this was less true at the lower levels of government. Local government, it argued, tends to retain engineering personnel “who generally do manage and ‘know’ their road networks intimately”.

In the case of Darebin, in Melbourne's north-east, the council has a pavement management system that audits the condition of its 512 kilometres of roads. Any requests for road improvements such as roundabouts and widening need to be closely costed and put out to budget for public review.

Darebin still carries out road maintenance in-house and has a substantial number of engineers on staff, thus ensuring it is able to carry out accurate estimates of bigger projects that need to be outsourced. This limits the chance of cost overruns in the final construction price, Darebin Council's director of assets and business services Steve Hamilton said. "We have a good idea of unit rates based on our experience.”

This is not the case at VicRoads, according to Mr Harley, who claimed the agency no longer has experience building things and no previous job estimates to work off. "VicRoads has to go for the lowest tender, and because they have been deskilled over the years, they can't tell whether or not the price has been deflated - or inflated," he said.

VicRoads, denies this, claiming that even though most of its road construction works are outsourced, the agency still undertakes some road and bridge design and occasional minor road construction. VicRoads' director of procurement and contract management Mark Koliba said this has been a deliberate strategy “to ensure that VicRoads maintains capability, continues to be an informed purchaser and is up to date with current market rates”.
How much does a road cost?

VicRoads declined to provide costings on road construction, stating there are too many variables influencing the cost to be able to generalise. These include the location of the project, whether land acquisition was required, whether services such as power, water or telecommunications needed to be relocated, and the availability of suitable construction materials. Costs also vary enormously depending on how much and what kinds of traffic the road is expected to carry. VicRoads looks after freeways and arterial roads in urban and non-urban areas, while municipal councils look after local roads.

As an indicator of the variation between road building costs, a major arterial road might require asphalt to a depth of 30 centimetres, while a local street might require asphalt only three centimetres deep.

The roundabout being built at the intersection of Gisborne-Melton Road and Melton Valley Drive, Melton, was contracted to Bitu-mill at $865,000 reflecting the scope of a project that involves an arterial road, traffic management measures and relocation of services. Meanwhile, a simple local roundabout constructed in a local street is more likely to cost $100,000 or less.

What is involved in building a local roundabout?

Design $3000
Construction prelims/mgmt $8000
Site preparation/demolition $4000
Road pavement $35,000
Kerb and channel $10,000
Footpath/crossovers $10,000
Drainage $20,000
Service alterations $5,000
Landscaping $5,000
Total $100,000



Why infrastructure costs more in Australia than France
Australian Financial Review, 1 August 2014

Tourists visit the Château de Versailles, which evolved from Louis XIII’s hunting lodge into one of France’s most magnificent palaces and the seat of the French government, to marvel at Louis XIV’s Grand Apartments and Hall of Mirrors. But just a few kilometres east,¬hidden from view under a nearby forest, is a far more prosaic structure: an ¬underground motorway.

The 10-kilometre road tunnel, known as “Duplex A86" was built by three French construction groups between 1997 and 2011 to connect the missing link in the A86 ring road that runs around Paris. At a total cost of €1.56 billion ($2.25 billion) it works out at about $226 million a kilometre.

On the other side of the world in Sydney, grand plans for the 33-kilometre long WestConnex motorway, which will include a 13-kilometre underground tunnel, are being pushed ahead by the NSW government.

This motorway, which will burrow beneath brick apartment blocks and fibro bungalows in western Sydney suburbs, will cost about $350 million a kilometre.
The cost comparison is not entirely fair – WestConnex’s tunnels will be taller and wider – but the stark difference in price between Australia and a high-cost country such as France with its 35-hour working week remains mind-boggling as the federal government embarks on a $50 billion infrastructure spending spree.

Foreign construction groups hoping to win work on some of the infrastructure projects up for grabs – including ¬Melbourne’s $8 billion East West Link ¬tunnel, Sydney’s $3 billion NorthConnex tunnel and Queensland’s $1.6 billion Toowoomba bypass – marvel at the expense of building in Australia.
“In general, it is more expensive than most other places," says José Manuel Entrecanales, the chairman and chief executive of Acciona, the Spanish infrastructure group that has built highspeed railway lines, desalination plants and roads around the world.

Australia is a very sensitive, demanding society, and you have to pay for that."

MORE THAN JUST HIGH WAGES

Australia’s high wages are a well-known problem, with French construction group Bouygues claiming workers cost $80 an hour in Australia to employ compared with just €30 ($46) in France.

But the causes of Australia’s high infrastructure costs are far more pervasive than pricey labour, creating an enormous challenge for governments hoping to deliver new roads, railways and hospitals on time and on budget.

At issue is the time that commuters are trapped in traffic on the way to work or spend circling Sydney Airport, the amount of coal and grain that can be exported without being held up by bottlenecks on railways as trains are delayed on their way to ports; and the cost and quality of our healthcare.

Prescriptive tender processes which require financing to be lined up before ¬construction bids are submitted; the use of multifarious sub-contractors creating unnecessary layers of management; poor project management; and governments that fail to buy materials at the cheapest price available all drive up costs.

Scott Charlton, the chief executive of toll road group Transurban , has identified ¬governments’ propensity to specify every last detail used in new infrastructure as being a key factor pushing up costs, joking earlier this year that his company could save taxpayers money by letting contractors choose their own bolt colours.

“We’re not going to tell you that your bolts have to be pink, you can have the bolts whatever colour you want."

Charlton claims Transurban, which will build the NorthConnex road tunnel in western Sydney to link the M2 and F3 freeways after approaching the NSW government with an unsolicited bid, ran a more efficient tender process than the public sector would have done.

The toll road group sent out an eight-page document to design and construction companies, asking them to come up with their best ideas for the tunnel, rather than issuing thousands of pages of specifications.
Nicholas Wall, director of business development for Acciona’s Australian infrastructure business, agrees governments can be unnecessarily demanding in the early stages of tenders, particularly on designs.
“Historically governments have asked for multiple drawings, both cross and long sections, which are well above and beyond what is required," he says.

LIMITING INNOVATION

John O’Rourke, the principal of Plenary, an infrastructure investment group that specialises in public-private partnerships (PPPs) and was part of the consortium that built the Gold Coast’s new light rail system, says governments that “over specify" limit innovation. “The best projects are where the state does a good job in planning the outputs that it wants, not the inputs," he says.

Infrastructure investors who take stakes in PPPs such as schools and hospitals after they are built also complain about the large numbers of “key performance indicators" required by governments. These include obligations to respond to telephone calls to help desks within 30 seconds, watering grass on school ovals frequently and ¬fixing broken windows within a specified period of time.

The quality of service is laudable, but investors say budgeting for what they claim are over-staffed help desks and maintenance services pushes up costs.

Governments like PPPs, because the risks of cost blowouts are usually borne by the private sector, not taxpayers.

But the construction companies that build Australia’s largest projects are getting fed up with being asked by governments to absorb unexpected risks, and want the model to change. This means risks are being forced back onto taxpayers.

“If risk is pushed onto the contractor, the contractor has to then price that risk into their bid, which inflates the price,
" points out Graeme Hunt, chief executive ofTransfield Services . “We have on several occasions made a decision not to proceed [with a ¬tender] because we felt the risk cannot be priced or managed commensurate with returns available."

Leighton Holdings is still trying to shore up its balance sheet following heavy losses on its fixed-price Airport Link and Victorian desalination plant projects, and is facing up to $1 billion of losses on a $1.85 billion contract to design and build a jetty for energy group Chevron on its Gorgon project in Western Australia that has run into trouble.

Leighton’s new Spanish owners, Grupo ACS, are reluctant to wade into projects they perceive as risky, with the chief executive Marcelino Fernandez Verdes this week claiming Leighton “didn’t go on" with a ¬tender for Melbourne’s East West Link ¬tunnel because the geotechnical risks were “not acceptable".

David Williams, director of the University of Queensland’s geotechnical engineering centre, says Australian contractors have too often rushed out to buy expensive tunnelling machines (which cost hundreds of millions of dollars) when digging new tunnels, rather than taking time to accurately assess geological conditions. “There is a tendency to focus more on the tunnel boring machine or the equipment to make sure it’s capable of getting through whatever you might hit and paying less attention to what you hit."

RISK AVERSE

Other construction groups have also shown signs of becoming more risk averse, with the UK’s Balfour Beatty last month pulling out of a three-way race to build a $1.6 billion light rail line down Sydney’s George Street. Balfour Beatty, which is battling sliding profits in its home market, is believed to have baulked at the financial risk it would have to take if it was the successful bidder for the light rail line due to the uncertain cost involved in relocating utilities.

Two big contractors falling out of two major projects in short succession is a ¬worrying sign for Tony Abbott’s ambitions to be known as an “infrastructure prime minister".

To keep projects on track, governments need to engage contractors earlier on in the development process, rather than telling them what to do, says Marc Vogts, the former BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto executive now running the John Grill centre for project leadership at the University of Sydney.
“Contractors themselves have a lot to offer in terms of solutions," Vogts says.
“They take on such large projects that if they fail, their business will fail . . . they can deliver a lot of technical and ¬commercial innovation."

Contractors feel the same. The Spaniard in charge of Leighton’s new PPP division, Angel Muriel, has already expressed views that Australia could benefit from new design and construction techniques, and that more competition would drive ¬contractors to become more innovative, according to people in the industry. (Muriel declined to comment.)

Better technology could also be part of the answer. Darren Weir, the director of Laing O’Rourke’s Queensland and Northern Territory business, says the British group is now using digital engineering modelling and “augmented reality" systems on local projects to get a sense of what they will look like when they are finished.

“We build a job twice – we build a job virtually, and sort out all the problems in the digital model, and then apply that on site," Weir says. “In Western Australia we have guys walking around construction sites with iPads fully uploaded with the digital model of the construction sequence so they’ve got current information. "

Laing O’Rourke has used digital engi¬neering in the building of London’s second-tallest skyscraper, the Leadenhall Building, colloquially known as “the Cheesegrater".

Still, while more technology and less bureaucratic red tape may be part of the solution to lower costs, industry ¬participants remain concerned by the lack of long-term planning for Australia’s ¬infrastructure needs.

POOR PIPELINE

A poor pipeline of new infrastructure projects in Australia,which has forced bidders to compete for one-off “mega projects" rather than being able to spread bets across a range of projects, has been a driving force behind high costs, says ¬Plenary’s O’Rourke.

Similarly, Garry Bowditch, chief executive of the SMART infrastructure group at Wollongong University, argues Australia’s “staccato project flows" have made it ¬difficult for companies to make long term investments in people and technology.

Bowditch also believes governments need to plan better for unexpected changes during construction, citing the national broadband network as an example of a project that failed to deal with soaring costs. “There is an urgent need to better provision for new information, especially when costs blow out so the scale and scope of projects can be reconsidered," Bowditch says.

Vogts argues stronger project leadership and governance would help define the scope of projects before they are financed, pointing out it is hard to backtrack once projects are under way.

“There are a lot of people who are striving to get good systems and processes and get the project right, but you’ve got to stand back and say, ‘Did you do the right project?’ "

Vogts credits state governments with having appetite to learn from the private sector, with NSW’s WestConnex Delivery Authority sending two project directors to participate in the John Grill centre’s inaugural executive leadership program which starts this month (three other people from the NSW government will also attend along with 12 people from different industries in the private sector).

John Fitzgerald, the acting co-ordinator of government body Infrastructure ¬Australia, says greater willingness by both governments and the private ¬sector to collect and release data after projects are finished would also help improve performance.

“Learning from experience across state boundaries and on a national level could be an important contributor to improving practices but that’s a lot easier said than done," he says.

Governments have started thinking about how they approach new infrastructure projects, with governments in NSW and Victoria now accepting so-called “unsolicited" proposals from industry, such as Transurban’s NorthConnex proposal, allowing for more creative thinking.

Some have also started reimbursing a portion of bidding costs to unsuccessful tenderers, with losing bidders on Queensland’s Toowoomba bypass receiving about $4 million of their tender costs back.

Charged with delivering long-term project pipelines, better leadership and communication with the private sector, simplifying tender processes, creating more flexible labour practices and making savvier purchasing decisions, governments should not underestimate the task ahead, Vogts says.
“We’ve got a big challenge ahead of us . . . fundamentally we have to do more with less."
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Old May 30th, 2015, 09:11 AM   #1063
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One of the biggest features of Victoria’s Labor Government’s infrastructure agenda is to remove 50 level crossings around Melbourne. The program is expected to cost $5 billion, take eight years to complete and be paid for by selling the port of Melbourne. Traditionally Melbourne has built its freeway network whereas Sydney removed most of the suburban level crossings. So now Sydney is playing catch up with freeway network development and Melbourne is playing catch up with level crossing removals.
There are only a small number of level crossings left in Sydney, most of them being on the Richmond Line, although there is one on Parramatta Road at Granville (Carlingford Line).

With the Richmond Line, there are plans to remove the Garfield Road crossing at Riverstone and replace it with a bridge.

Not too sure what the future holds for the Parramatta Road crossing, which is a major chokepoint during peak.
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Old June 2nd, 2015, 02:22 PM   #1064
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Tasmanian Midland Highway

Recently, the Federal and Tasmanian Governments announced a 10 year $500m plan to upgrade the Midland Highway, the main highway in Tasmania that connects Hobart with Launceston, its two biggest cities. The Feds contribute $400m and Tasmania contributes $100m.

Although duplication of the complete length remains a long term goal, only a small section will be duplicated as projected traffic levels don’t warrant a four lane carriageway the full length. The objective is to upgrade the highway to a minimum AusRAP Level 3 standard; this will be done with 24 small to medium projects.

Projects consist of:
• Installing flexible wire rope safety barriers
• Intersection and alignment upgrades
• Additional overtaking lanes
• Widening lanes and wider medians
• Removing roadside hazards
• Duplication between Perth and Breadalbane (west of Launcestion airport)

Interactive website available: www.midlandhighway.tas.gov.au
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Old June 2nd, 2015, 02:23 PM   #1065
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First National Infrastructure Audit released

Infrastructure Australia (IA) has released its first national audit which showed that road congestion costs Australia $13.7b annually now; but this will rise to $53b annually by 2031 if no action is taken.

The audit makes 81 findings including:

• Australia's population is expected to grow from 22.3 million in 2011 to 30.5 million in 2031—with the majority of the growth occurring in our capital cities.
• The expected population growth reinforces the economic importance of our capital cities. They contributed $854 billion to our economy in 2011 and are projected to contribute $1,621 billion in 2031.
• Congestion threatens economic growth and living standards and could cost Australia $53 billion by 2031.
• Without action, road travel times in Perth, Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide, Brisbane and Canberra are expected to increase by at least 20 per cent in the most congested corridors by 2031.
• On average, demand for public transport in our capital cities is set to almost double over the next 20 years.
• Hot spots such as the Pilbara and Gladstone also merit close attention. Today they contribute $44 billion to the national economy. By 2031 this is projected to more than double to $110 billion.
• The national land freight task is expected to grow by 80 per cent between by 2031, with a large component expected to be handled by road freight vehicles.
• Maintaining and maximising the efficiency of existing infrastructure will be critical, and in many cases will be of equal or greater importance as developing new infrastructure projects.
In terms of policy settings the audit proposes that:
• improving governance and modernising regulatory settings so we get the best out of our infrastructure;
• boosting transparency and project assessment processes to enable informed choices; and
• greater sharing of information on infrastructure performance and outcomes to improve long-term decision making.


Later this year IA will produce a 15 year pipeline of priority projects and policy reforms.


Website: http://www.infrastructureaustralia.gov.au/

The latest infrastructure priority list, dated December 2013 can be found here:

http://www.infrastructureaustralia.g...Web_update.pdf
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Old June 3rd, 2015, 09:33 PM   #1066
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Old June 3rd, 2015, 11:35 PM   #1067
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So, you're getting done for doing 100kph in a 100kph limit? Are there no margin formulas? In the UK we usually have a 2mph + 10% rule, so in a 70 mph limit you'll not get fined unless your driving at 79mph. As speedometers alway under-read you could do an 80 indicated without getting caught, as your real speed is likely to be 75mph.
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Old June 4th, 2015, 08:32 AM   #1068
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So, you're getting done for doing 100kph in a 100kph limit? Are there no margin formulas? In the UK we usually have a 2mph + 10% rule, so in a 70 mph limit you'll not get fined unless your driving at 79mph. As speedometers alway under-read you could do an 80 indicated without getting caught, as your real speed is likely to be 75mph.
http://www.worldcarfans.com/11506039...ing-100-kmh-in

It was an 'error' on the part of Queensland Police...........but yeah it's really hilarious either way
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Old June 12th, 2015, 12:33 AM   #1069
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Old June 17th, 2015, 08:51 AM   #1070
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Kilmore-Wallan Bypass

The twin towns of Kilmore and Wallan lie north of Melbourne where the Northern Highway (B75) deviates from the Hume Freeway. Over coming years, as Melbourne continues to grow these two towns are like likely to be considered satellite cities to Melbourne, as much as Werribee and Sunbury are considered today. The combined population is expected to grow from about 15,000 today to 40,000 by 2031 with a corresponding increase in through heavy vehicle traffic serving Bendigo, Echuca, northern Victoria and southern NSW from Melbourne.

Vicroads have undertaken planning studies and environmental effects statement and have determined that the western bypass is the best option for Kilmore (blue line). The southern part of the bypass is a revamped Epping-Kilmore Rd while the western section is a new road with three new roundabouts. Funding is not yet committed for by the state and no construction timetable set. An eastern bypass of Kilmore was considered, but rejected based on passing near an equine precinct and through locally sensitive areas.

Vicroads video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BmSrAnX5UaU


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Old June 17th, 2015, 08:53 AM   #1071
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Koo-Wee-Rup Bypass, Pakenham to South Gippsland Hwy, Victoria

The Koo Wee Rup road project is roughly 20km long, lies at the edge of Melbourne south eastern urban fringe and will link the Princes Freeway at Pakenham to the South Gippsland Highway just south of Koo Wee Rup.

The project will be done in three stages with the first stage due for completion this year:

Stage 1 - Construct new 3.4km two lane bypass of Koo Wee Rup township (blue line)

Stage 2 – upgrade the Koo Wee Rup road to divided highway from the Princes Fwy to the northern end of the bypass constructed in Stage 1 (red line)

Stage 3 – convert the divided highway to freeway by building new overpasses, on/off ramps, and a new connection to the Freeway at Pakenham (black lines)

At the moment there is no timeline for construction of Stages 2 and 3 and no monies committed.

The bypass is expected to be beneficial to South Gippslanders and those who wish to go to Philip Island, a popular holiday and weekend spot. This traffic will avoid the Cranbourne urban area (yellow shaded) that the current South Gippsland Hwy passes through.


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Old June 24th, 2015, 09:45 PM   #1072
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Legacy Way, Brisbane

Legacy Way to open within 48 hours: Lord Mayor Graham Quirk

The Legacy Way toll tunnel should be open within the next 48 hours, Lord Mayor Graham Quirk said, bringing to an end his administration's TransApex infrastructure program.

Work on the $1.5 billion, 4.6-kilometre Legacy Way, which will link Toowong to the Inner City Bypass at Kelvin Grove, started in April 2011 and had been expected to be open by late 2014.
http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/quee...24-ghwjt4.html

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Old July 6th, 2015, 08:37 PM   #1073
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Toowoomba Second Range Crossing

Ferrovial consortium’s bid chosen for Toowoomba toll road project worth 1.6 billion Australian dollars, located in Queensland (Australia)

* Ferrovial, through a consortium headed by subsidiary Cintra Infraestructuras (Nexus consortium) has been selected as preferred tenderer for the design, construction, financing, operation and maintenance of a 41-kilometre section of the Toowoomba Second Range Crossing toll road in Toowoomba (Queensland).
* The project spans a concession period of 25 years and involves an estimated investment of 1.6 billion Australian dollars.
* The consortium will now work with the Queensland government to finalise the contract.

The project includes the contraction of a 41-kilometre new section of toll road, bypassing the city of Toowoomba and thereby improving traffic conditions in the region by reducing the heavy goods vehicle traffic that currently crosses the centre of town. The project will also enhance opportunities for local economic development and boost employment and the local supply chain.

The 25-year concession starts from the date the highway opens to traffic, scheduled for the end of 2018.
Full press release: http://www.ferrovial.com/en/press-ro...and-australia/
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Old July 21st, 2015, 02:10 PM   #1074
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Snow at the Queensland Border!

If you come to Australia you shouldn’t really to expect to see this, but courtesy of some cold weather last week sometimes the unexpected happens.

It may have been a few cms and melted by lunchtime. The town of Stanthorpe received the most snow in Queensland but it also fell in and behind the mountains down through New South Wales and into Victoria. Although no snow in the big cities, it was a real struggle to get warmer than 10C in Melbourne last week.




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Old July 21st, 2015, 05:34 PM   #1075
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When was the last time it snowed in Queensland (particularly in lowlands, not mountains)?
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Old July 21st, 2015, 09:25 PM   #1076
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27 Aug 2008
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Old July 21st, 2015, 10:18 PM   #1077
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Pacific Highway Upgrade | Titenbar to Ewingsdale

Quote:
Originally Posted by DAJAN View Post
RMS has actually posted some recent pics of Tintenbar to Ewingsdale...

http://www.rms.nsw.gov.au/projects/n...ale/index.html




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Old August 13th, 2015, 03:07 AM   #1078
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New M12 Motorway in Sydney.

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Old August 25th, 2015, 02:34 PM   #1079
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Perth Gateway Project update

Nearing completion







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Old August 27th, 2015, 07:24 AM   #1080
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Pacific Highway Upgrade | Frederickton to Eungai









Roads and Maritime Services NSW
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