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Old September 3rd, 2007, 06:43 PM   #61
Jaeger
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The Original Orient Express route must have been one of the longest continous train Jouneys.

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Old September 3rd, 2007, 07:01 PM   #62
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Orient Express leaving London

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Interior

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Old September 3rd, 2007, 07:17 PM   #63
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Btw Seat 61 has some great info on Train Journeys Worldwide
including the Orient Express.

Website - http://www.seat61.com/index.html
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Old September 4th, 2007, 06:14 PM   #64
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Well the longest I've travelled by train was from Madrid to Paris on a Spanish Talgo overnight train, and from Berlin to Paris on a German Nachtzug (night train). Oh, also, from Milan to Paris on some Italian train. All were direct, no transfers, and only the German Nachtzug made some stops along the way.
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Old September 4th, 2007, 06:16 PM   #65
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^ I hope to one day travel on the Orient Express. Wow, quelle classe!
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Old September 16th, 2007, 08:23 AM   #66
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Cheesh, this all reminds me of a couple of geezers outside Christ Church Cathedral smack downtown here on Sainte-Catherine a few weekends ago. I asked one of the pair there, at their little table curbside with its large placards, what was useful about bridging the Bering Strait, in English. English being his first language as well, I remember rebutting his reply (he basically said it would be a good thing -- hmphh), telling him that he didn't understand my question.

Wow, passionate about bridging the Bering Strait, eh? We must be more American than I thought!

Last edited by trainrover; September 16th, 2007 at 08:55 AM.
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Old September 16th, 2007, 08:34 AM   #67
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My longest train journey was Toronto to Jasper. Our train was 27 hours late. Already three hours late on our second evening and with only 100Km left to travel to Winnipeg, it had to travel back 900Km due to some rock slide. We were exceptionally fortunate coz the next morning we awoke to our train hugging the western end of gorgeous Lake Superior's North Shore for several hours. I understand that whole stretch is still dedicated to freight traffic and -- psst! -- double-tracked.

I guess I could say all the way to Vancouver, coz we took a Greyhound that was driven by some cowboy like a bat out of hell hugging those chasms cliffside from Jasper to Banff, whereat we picked up a paralleling westbound transcontinental to the terminus.

Even after snuggling right up against the Rockies and BC's mountain ranges, by far Lake Superior offered the most rewarding views -- we were very lucky, such that being late in life has turned out to have seldom been any bother to me.

Now I remember! We were so late getting to Winnipeg; where the parelleling transcontinentals met and swapped their rear ends with one another; that we missed the second, daily, paralleling train; and so opted to train into the northerly resort of Japser instead of Banff.

(Seattle to LA {and back} was cheesy, cheesy, cheesy! I took to drinking on those ones on my way to and from El Paso, I did. )

Last edited by trainrover; September 16th, 2007 at 08:57 AM.
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Old September 16th, 2007, 07:21 PM   #68
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The longest continuous train ride I ever did was from Brussels to Ljubljana in Slovenia on the 'Tauern-express'. The train continued to Athens, Greece. It took me 20 hours. This was about 1400 km, I think. This was 25 years ago, I don't think this train still exists.



Tauern express in 1982 © www.hklnet.de.

Last edited by hix; September 16th, 2007 at 07:32 PM.
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Old September 17th, 2007, 08:35 AM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
some coaches and some freight wagons can change boogies at the border. That is done every day for freight trains between Spain and France. Anyway it is slow, a train can wait also 10 to 15 hours at the border, also for customs checks, that's way Spain is planning to convert all its network to the standard gauge.

Between western Europe and the ex-URSS nework, couplers must also be changed (chain and automatic, respectively).

I have read of a direct connection Madrid-Moscow, where bogies were replaced between Spain and France (1664==>1435) and somewhere between Poland and Lithuania or Belasu (1435==>1520).
The tough part regarding Russia's railroads is that the gauge difference between them (1520 mm) and 'standard' gauge (1435 mm) was set as such by the Czars to make it as difficult as possible for invading armies to use their railroads. The difference was large enough to prevent direct running between them but too small to allow laying a third rail to easily create dual-gauge track.

I'm interested in that item about Spain planning to regauge its track to standard gauge. Is there any set timeline for that?

Also (and very interesting, too), from what I am aware of, China's railroads are 100% compatible with those of North America (Canada, Mexico, USA). That is why I am thinking that if a direct North America-Asia rail link is ever built (under the Bering Straits), it would likely all be built to such gauge and equipment standards. I am also aware of ongoing plans to build a standard-gauge railroad between China and western Europe, allowing China-Europe commerce to go direct rather than transiting North America (ship -> rail across USA and/or Canada -> ship).

That said and I have not checked, but how long is Amtrak's Sunset Limited route (Florida <-> Los Angeles, CA)?

Mike
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Old September 17th, 2007, 12:42 PM   #70
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Quote:
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The tough part regarding Russia's railroads is that the gauge difference between them (1520 mm) and 'standard' gauge (1435 mm) was set as such by the Czars to make it as difficult as possible for invading armies to use their railroads. The difference was large enough to prevent direct running between them but too small to allow laying a third rail to easily create dual-gauge track.
I don't think so. Like in Spain and Ireland, I think it that the decision to use a 1520 mm gauge was simply random.

For example the Irish 1600 mm gauge is simply (about) (1435+1575+1880)/3=1600 mm. 1435, 1575 and 1880 were the gauges used by the first three Irish railroads.
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Old September 17th, 2007, 08:25 PM   #71
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My longest was the 'Eastern & Oriental Express' from Singapore to Bangkok 2 years ago... absolutely amazing. 3 days / 2 nights stopping at Johor Bahru (immigration), Kuala Lumpur (brief pause), Butterworth (day trip to Georgetown / Penang), Kanchanburi (Bridge over River Kwai / Death Railway Museum / War Cemetary), and ending at Bangkok Huampalong (sp?) station.

I might do a photo thread of it if I can be arsed...
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Old September 17th, 2007, 08:27 PM   #72
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Quote:
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Orient Express leaving London

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Sorry to be a pedant, but that must be approaching London, as the train is crossing the Thames South to North
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Old September 18th, 2007, 06:45 PM   #73
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Good to see this thread is still alive and kicking, even if it has strayed from the original point ... which was, what is the longest distance you can travel from somewhere on earth, by rail, changing trains if you wish, and crossing platforms, but still continuing by rail?

The longest trips I've made on a train involved two nights on the train in the first instance, and three in the second: from Melbourne, Victoria, to Alice Springs, Northern Territory, and Cairns, Queensland, respectively.

Yes, there were changes of gauge, and changes of train. But by the time we got to Cairns, I think my daughter realized the size of the country she lived in, far moreso than from any flight by plane.
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Old September 18th, 2007, 10:12 PM   #74
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Quote:
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Good to see this thread is still alive and kicking, even if it has strayed from the original point ... which was, what is the longest distance you can travel from somewhere on earth, by rail, changing trains if you wish, and crossing platforms, but still continuing by rail?

The longest trips I've made on a train involved two nights on the train in the first instance, and three in the second: from Melbourne, Victoria, to Alice Springs, Northern Territory, and Cairns, Queensland, respectively.

Yes, there were changes of gauge, and changes of train. But by the time we got to Cairns, I think my daughter realized the size of the country she lived in, far moreso than from any flight by plane.
One-way, with transfers, I'd say somewhere in Portugal or southwest Spain <-> Vladivostok.

OTOH, you can take a 'lap of the USA' NYC->NYC by Amtrak.

Mike
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Old September 20th, 2007, 09:12 AM   #75
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Quote:
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One-way, with transfers, I'd say somewhere in Portugal or southwest Spain <-> Vladivostok.

OTOH, you can take a 'lap of the USA' NYC->NYC by Amtrak.

Mike
I would have thought Hanoi was further from Portugal than Vladivostok: further back in the thread, Norway & Scotland were also candidates for the western end of the trip.
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Old September 22nd, 2007, 03:39 AM   #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hix View Post
The longest continuous train ride I ever did was from Brussels to Ljubljana in Slovenia on the 'Tauern-express'. The train continued to Athens, Greece. It took me 20 hours. This was about 1400 km, I think. This was 25 years ago, I don't think this train still exists.
Definitely not, I didn't even know it had existed. The farthest you can now get from Ljubljana in the direction Brussels without changing train, is Munich (or Zurich, but Munich is more suitable, I guess), and Ljubljana is also the north-western terminus of the train coming from Thessaloniki. There was a direct train Ljubljana-Athens in the summer of 2005.



Quote:
Originally Posted by jkjkjk View Post
Using europan train timatable system (include parts of asia) i get these:

Vila Real Santo Antonio
Faro(P)
Lisboa Oriente
Hendaye
Lille Europe
Bruxelles-Midi
Köln Hbf
Warszawa Wschodnia
Brest Central
Minsk(BY)

58 h. 58 min, 4600 km

Minsk(BY)
Nowoalekseewka
Taiga
Ulan-Ude Pass
Djida
Bejing

230 h. 52 min, 9714 km

chinese timetalbe as far i can understand:

Bejing
Kunming

38 h. 40 min 3163 km

form vietnamese timetable:

Bejing
Hanoi

39 h. 54 min 2967 km

Hanoi
Saigon

41h 1762 km
Where did you get the distances??? It's so hard or impossible to get rail distances!
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Old September 22nd, 2007, 11:09 AM   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
Definitely not, I didn't even know it had existed. The farthest you can now get from Ljubljana in the direction Brussels without changing train, is Munich (or Zurich, but Munich is more suitable, I guess), and Ljubljana is also the north-western terminus of the train coming from Thessaloniki. There was a direct train Ljubljana-Athens in the summer of 2005.
Travelling by train was cheaper in those days than by airplain. I know of some international trains who passed in Brussels and Belgium. There was Ostend-Athens, Ostend-Moscou, Paris-Copenhagen (I think it still exists), Amsterdam-Paris, Ostend-Milano... At the time the Brits came to Ostend by ferry and continued their journey by train... so Ostend was an important international station.
I took the train to Moscou several times (until Berlin). They had these nice Soviet coupés. I you gave the (russian) gard some german marks he would give you a separate room (for 1 person!) with washing corner and free russian sigarettes. This train stopt for a very long time at the border with East-Germany!
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Old September 25th, 2007, 01:00 AM   #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post

Where did you get the distances??? It's so hard or impossible to get rail distances!
From european timetable system. System itself provides distances informations, but only a very few web implementations does it also. For example those Czech (http://jizdnirady.idnes.cz/connform.asp?tt=a&cl=E5&p=MF

Anyway, part of my route was russian-chinese Moscow-Beijing train, with its 6661 km route http://jizdnirady.idnes.cz/Route.asp...&s2=34338&p=MF.

But there are longer routes, 8842 km Kharkiv - Vladivostok train for example http://jizdnirady.idnes.cz/Route.asp...&s2=49546&p=MF

Note: i am not sure, if the direct train links will work
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Old September 29th, 2007, 03:12 AM   #79
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^ Thanks!
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Old October 3rd, 2007, 01:02 AM   #80
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Thanks jkjkjk, thats a really good site.
I've just worked out my longest train journey, Bejing to London is 14266km. It took 191 hours, but thankfully I stopped at a few placed along the way.
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