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Old December 26th, 2008, 02:43 PM   #101
test0036
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China

Domestic:

Train T264/5; Guangzhou to Lhasa; 4980 km; 55 hours 53 minutes; depart at 13:07 every other day
Train T266/3; Lhasa to Guangzhou; 4980 km; 56 hours 10 minutes; depart at 10:00 every other day

International:

Train K19; Beijing to Moscow; 9025 km; 144 hours 01 minutes; depart at 22:56 (Beijing time) on Saturdays
Train K20; Moscow to Beijing; 9025 km; 144 hours 27 minutes; depart at 23:53 (Moscow time) on Fridays
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Old December 26th, 2008, 03:54 PM   #102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaroslaw View Post
Yes, through Iran. There is a service from Ankara to Teheran, I think (and the train goes on a ferry on lake Van), but there is no train line from Zahedan to Quetta. Out of Quetta to Lahore there is a beautiful line through the mountains, with lots of tunnels and bridges, built a hundred years ago by the British.
Not entirely exact. The most distant point reached by the Iranian railways
in the South-East direction is Bam. From there, there is a gap till Zahedan,
supposedly closed sometimes in 2009, but it's been announced for decades
now, so I'll believe it when I'll see it. Zahedan is the most western point
served by the pakistani railways (with large gauge track) and from there,
there is one bi-monthly (!) mixed train available to reach Quetta. From there
you can travel to India and even to Bangladesh, now. But there is still no
way to enter China by rail this way.
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Old December 26th, 2008, 06:26 PM   #103
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme View Post


Just tried it again and it came up with this: (221 hours and 5 changes). If the link below doesn't work, just type in Thurso, Scotland to Peking at www.db.de


Link
The link doesn't work because DB doesn't save the searches. When I go to www.db.de, there is no place to enter departure and arrival stations. Eventually I find this--http://reiseauskunft.bahn.de/bin/query.exe/en?--but it only works for Europe.

Perhaps you could just paste your result?
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Old December 26th, 2008, 06:28 PM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcVD View Post
Not entirely exact. The most distant point reached by the Iranian railways
in the South-East direction is Bam. From there, there is a gap till Zahedan,
supposedly closed sometimes in 2009, but it's been announced for decades
now, so I'll believe it when I'll see it. Zahedan is the most western point
served by the pakistani railways (with large gauge track) and from there,
there is one bi-monthly (!) mixed train available to reach Quetta. From there
you can travel to India and even to Bangladesh, now. But there is still no
way to enter China by rail this way.
Thanks for the correction. When we got into Zahedan, the only thing in our minds was to get out again, so we didn't go in search of the train station.

From Pakistan to China, the only link is the Karakorum Highway, only good in the summer, across the Himalayas. A rail link... hm, maybe in the next century.
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Old December 27th, 2008, 05:45 PM   #105
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in India, there is a train which goes from the northern most state of Jammu to the southernmost state of Kerala

Quote:
The 6317 Himsagar Express (between Kanyakumari and Jammu Tawi) has the longest run in terms of total time (also in terms of distance, see below). It covers its route of 3751km in 71 hours and 45 minutes. It’s counterpart 6318 takes 70 hours and 50 mintues.
source: http://www.**********/faq/faq-trivia.html
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 09:22 AM   #106
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What about the train line from Shanghai to Cambodia?
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 09:23 AM   #107
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71 hours and 45 minutes?!?!?!?! HOLY SH$%^&, put some HSR on that line!
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Old January 5th, 2009, 05:04 PM   #108
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-The only international train line out of China in that area is the weekly from Nanning to Hanoi. No international service from Cambodia. Doubt if any trains are running there at all anymore, actually.
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Old January 5th, 2009, 05:18 PM   #109
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Not exactly. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4qttp6nDts
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Old February 13th, 2009, 11:46 PM   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yardmaster View Post
Maps on the internet suggest that the Iranians are bridging the gap between Yazd, Kerman, & Zahedan and hence there will be a continuous line (albeit with break of gauge) from Istanbul or Europe via Russia and Armenia to Chittagong, Bangladesh.
The line already goes as far east as Bam. You can see line construction
works on Google Earth as far as Shur Gaz, half the way to Zahedan, with
most satellites pictures being from 2006 or older. Works for the new Zahedan
station, with, supposedly, gauge-change facilities, are also visible.

Iranian railways have recently announced that the line should open "before
end of this year", which, if translated in our calendar, means before mid
march. However, there have already been numerous similar announcements
in the past, so I'll believe it when I'll see it.

On the other hand, the connexion between Moscow and Tehran through Armenia is now severed : the line goes through Nakitchevan, which is a
remote province of Azerbaijdjan, country currently at war with Armenia. As
a result, the line is interrupted at the Armenian-Nakitchevan border. There
are still trains between Tabriz, Jolfa and Nakitchevan, but not further north.
East of Jolfa, the line used to continue along the Arax river, up to Astara,
on the caspian sea shore. But here again, it is blocked at each border
crossing and therefore totally disused. From Google Earth, one can still see
rolling stock abandoned in the station sidings, probably forever...

And further north, the same scheme repeats itself with Abkhazia, region that
recently separated from Georgia. Our railway line goes through there; it
still runs between Russia and the capital city of Abkhazia, but is completely
destroyed further south. The relations between Russia and Georgia are so
badly damaged that there is even no more postal service between them.

On the other hand, Iran is said to be building a line to Astara, city on the
Iran/Azerbaijan border, at the caspian seashore, where railways of
Azerbaidjan are already present. I suppose that from there,
there is still a possibility to continue to Moscow. Armenia wants a rail
link to Iran too, but it would go through very mountainous terrain and
therefore would cost a fortune. I doubt very much that Armenia can afford it.

In any case, what we are seeing here is the railway network of a whole
region, initially built to serve soviet interests, being completely re-drawed
as a consequence of the new regional politics.

So what really remains is the line to Istanbul, which won't be really usable
before the end of the Marmaray project. And after that, there will still be the
Van lake ferry, which is severly limiting the line capacity. So we're still quite
far from seeing container trains plying the rails between Antwerp and
Mumbai...
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Old February 14th, 2009, 11:11 PM   #111
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What's the real point of such long journeys?

I'm sure they are great when you have the time to enjoy the scenery and are in the mood of spending a week on a train. But most times I'm sure people want to spend most of the time on their destinations, not getting into them.

I thoght the main reason for not taking a plane was the price, but nowadays airfares are very affordable. Maybe trains cater a lot of people who are affraid to fly

I would love to take the Transiberian, it must be a life-time experience. But only once and that's it.

I believe the longest train journeys that are still pratical are those of 1,000 kms / 3 hours, which are far more convenietn than flyng. For anything further, I'd take the plane.
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Old February 15th, 2009, 02:52 PM   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Assemblage23 View Post
What's the real point of such long journeys?

I'm sure they are great when you have the time to enjoy the scenery and are in the mood of spending a week on a train. But most times I'm sure people want to spend most of the time on their destinations, not getting into them.

I thoght the main reason for not taking a plane was the price, but nowadays airfares are very affordable. Maybe trains cater a lot of people who are affraid to fly

I would love to take the Transiberian, it must be a life-time experience. But only once and that's it.

I believe the longest train journeys that are still pratical are those of 1,000 kms / 3 hours, which are far more convenietn than flyng. For anything further, I'd take the plane.
Yes and no.

In Europe and USA, train is expensive and for distances above 1000/1500
km (or less if no high-speed train available) flying is cheaper. I have been
by train from Brussels to Oslo, Athènes and Lisbon and each time it was
more expensive than flying. On the other way, trains aloow you to get a
real sense of travel, while air just gives you a means of transportation.
Quite a difference in my opinion.

In other countries, train is incredibly cheap, and it might indeed be cheaper
to stay for 2 days in the train than flying. Look at India, China, for exemple, or at the Trans-Asia : 55 Euros for traveling from Istanbul to Tehran, I don't
believe you can fly for less than that. And there are buses that are even
cheaper, but less confortable too.

And then, finally, any responsible person today should think about the
environmental impact of their activities; in that respect, train is definitely
much more environment-respectful than planes, or even buses. May be trains
are just ful of people, not afraid of flying, but more environment-conscious.
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Old February 15th, 2009, 08:28 PM   #113
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One has also to consider, that for many trips flights are just not available at all, as only bigger towns have airports.

The train networks are much more dense and connect much more places (also smaller town and villages).
The fact that a train can serve many intermediate stops also allows to run train services, where a plain would make no sense economically.

One Austrian examples: Graz (in the southeast) and Bregenz (in the west) are connected by a direct train. The trip takes long, about 9 hrs. Of course there are not much people using the train from one end to the other. But the train serves about 20 intermediate stops, which also generate passenger demand, and that makes such a train profitable.
There are no air services from Graz to Bregenz, as the towns are just to small to generate enough passengers for that. And as flights areb usually non-stop (maybe sometimes 1 or 2 intermediate stops), only relations with heavy point-to-point demand are suitable for airlines.
So, to get from Graz to Bregenz, the trains is the only choice, alltopugh it takes a long time.

And there are many other secondary relations, where flights are just not available and for which a combination train+flight+train also makes no sense, as too much time is lost for the transfers.



Also long-distance trains can be useful, alltough they take much longer than a plane, if they provide a good overnight connection: I prefer departure in the evening, sleeping in a sleeping/couchette car and arriving at the destination in the morning over getting up at 4 in the morning, making the way to the airport and then fly to the destination...



Also it has to be considered, that you can use the time on the train for working on the laptop, so it's not wasted time (I'm on a train from Graz to Vienna right now...).
From downtown A-city to downtown B-city a flight including getting to/from the airtort and check-in/out might take 3 hour, whereas the same trip by train takes - say - 5 hours. The flight itself takes 1 hr, the train trip itself 4 hrs.
So by train you can work for 4 whole hrs, whereas by plane only maybe 30 minutes (considering that during start/landing you can't work).
If you see the whole 5 hrs, you have wasted 2h30 by plane but only 1 hrs by train.
Of course this comparison requires, that on the train you have good working conditions (power supply, quiet atmosphere, a seat with a table).
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Old September 25th, 2012, 11:58 AM   #114
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wrong thread

Last edited by yaohua2000; September 25th, 2012 at 12:07 PM. Reason: wrong thread
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Old September 26th, 2012, 12:06 AM   #115
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanfan89 View Post
nice....

call me crazy but I would love to ride it once
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Old September 29th, 2012, 07:39 PM   #116
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Quote:
Originally Posted by himbaman View Post
there are, in fact, many trains on the line between Helsinki and Saint- Petersburg in Russia, and also between sweden and finland. ,
As far as I know only the finnish VR operate international freight trains from Finland to Haparanda, Sweden. The trackyard of Haparanda has both the russsian 1524 mm gauge and the western 1435mm.

No swedish freighttrains cross the finnish border.

There used to be plans to build the first 1524mm gauge line into Sweden when a new mine planned to open in the north, but the project stalled.


I used to dream about what if north korean leader Kim Jong Il supposed to visit Sweden with his personal train. That would be possible without any problems if he decided to exit in Haparanda (where he could meet the King)
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Old October 1st, 2012, 02:47 AM   #117
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[QUOTE=MarcVD;32255792

So what really remains is the line to Istanbul, which won't be really usable
before the end of the Marmaray project. And after that, there will still be the
Van lake ferry, which is severly limiting the line capacity. So we're still quite
far from seeing container trains plying the rails between Antwerp and
Mumbai...[/QUOTE]

Turkey and Iran have been having discussing a joint project to build a railway around Lake Van for some years now. Given the wider interest at stake in a new Asia-Europe rail link I think this is one project that is quite likely to happen. The trans-sib is getting increasingly crowded, and it is of no use to India. If Iran doesn't pull it's finger out on Van, then I wouldn't be too suprised if India puts pressure on them to act.
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Old October 1st, 2012, 02:55 AM   #118
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Quote:
does a subway loop count? it is a continuous journey
I bet the longest continuous journey will still be a long-distance train.

Airport people movers typically run 24/7. Dallas-Fort Worth's SkyLink goes around and around and around day and night in a 4.8 mile loop every 9 minutes. At least until the car you were in was taken out of service and sent to the depot, that is. You'd only cover about 768 miles going so slow, and I bet individual cars or the tracks get inspected about that frequently, so your continuous journey would be broken. All these issues apply to any other mass transit loop. 32 mph average including stops makes the DFW people mover example comparable to the average subway system's average speed.

Last edited by zaphod; October 1st, 2012 at 03:07 AM.
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Old October 2nd, 2012, 09:42 AM   #119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neb81 View Post
Turkey and Iran have been having discussing a joint project to build a railway around Lake Van for some years now. Given the wider interest at stake in a new Asia-Europe rail link I think this is one project that is quite likely to happen. The trans-sib is getting increasingly crowded, and it is of no use to India. If Iran doesn't pull it's finger out on Van, then I wouldn't be too suprised if India puts pressure on them to act.
Quite likely to happen, yes. But when ? The Van lake is entirely located within
Turkey, so Iran has nothing to do or to say over there. And besides that,
both countries have embarked in a lot of other more important projects, so a
line around Van lake is probably the least of their problems. New ferries to
cross the lake have been ordered recently, and those beasts usually have
a lifetime of 20+ years at least. I'm thus not expecting that to happen very
shortly.
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Old October 3rd, 2015, 11:52 AM   #120
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The longest train journey without changes is Moskwa - Pyongyang/North Korea.
Travel time: 8 days, 20h, 35min.
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