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Old July 20th, 2015, 09:45 AM   #221
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
Well the Class 70s were designed with input from train operators...

This Train Guide Rail Sim video explains everything there is to know about them..

I think you meant train drivers

I meant it just looks kind of odd. Like, the front has a bit of styling on it, just enough to clash magnificently with its industrial road hood.
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Old July 20th, 2015, 09:55 AM   #222
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I think you meant train drivers

I meant it just looks kind of odd. Like, the front has a bit of styling on it, just enough to clash magnificently with its industrial road hood.
Its a funky locomotive , indeed a more Industrial design compared with most locomotives over there.
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Old July 25th, 2015, 01:09 AM   #223
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Betting on the rails
Buffett buys BNSF as Congress considers reform legislation

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Old July 28th, 2015, 05:29 AM   #224
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Why mid-century diesel locomotives look more streamlined than their later counterparts?
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Old July 28th, 2015, 07:39 AM   #225
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Why mid-century diesel locomotives look more streamlined than their later counterparts?
The earliest diesels were designed to operate passenger, not freight, trains. For example, the B&O ordered one of the very first diesels, EMD's EA, to operate its principal name trains -- in part because (unlike its competitors) the railroad didn't have the resources to actually acquire new lightweight streamline equipment and instead simply rebuilt heavyweight equipment to look like it, therefore needing more powerful engines.



What seems to have happened is that early diesel road units were generally built on the E's successful model. EMD soon offered a four-axle variant, the FT; its major competitor, Alco, offered the lookalike PA-1 (six axles) and FA-1 (four-axles); and up to the early 1950s most mainline road diesels were produced from these designs.

What changed was when Alco had runaway success with the RS-1:



This design is called a road switcher. Early American switcher models were designed for yard work: they had low gearings and were designed to maximize visibility. The road switchers were built to have higher, road-speed gearings and added a comfort and safety hood on one side of the cab (it usually has a toilet inside). Essentially, it could do it all.

After a blunder or two, EMD rolled out its first successful road switcher model, the GP-7, about a decade after Alco had begun constructing its RS series.



Between EMD's aggressive marketing and the fact that its component parts are largely interchangeable with its E and F models (one could say the same about Alco's, but there were many many more E's and F's than PA's and FA's), the GP series soon became dominant in lighter branchline duty.

However, cab units would remain prevalent in mainline operations through midcentury. I would venture to suggest this is because late, heavy steam locomotives still moved bulk cargo while early diesels were largely assigned to priority freights; while six-axle road switcher power* was in existence from the start, its early purpose was to distribute the unit's weight over more axles for lighter-track branch lines.

Heavy, high-horsepower six-axle power did not catch on till the mid-60s, when EMD introduced the SD45:



This is the model that can be considered the "true ancestor" of modern American mainline power.
___________
* Check out that excellent example of a compound noun, by the way. This is English's version of the cargo-train compounds found in most Germanic languages.
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Old July 28th, 2015, 11:02 AM   #226
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Thanks for your explanation. In general, cab units are for passenger trains while road switchers are for freight.

By the way, using compound nouns can avoid the use of a lot of prepositions.
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Old July 28th, 2015, 11:39 AM   #227
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Thanks for your explanation. In general, cab units are for passenger trains while road switchers are for freight.
Kind of. It's probably better to say that cab units grew out of early streamline passenger designs that got modified for fast (i.e. mainline) freight, while road switchers grew out of a need for light, rugged, all-purpose (passenger and freight) branchline locomotives. By the early 1950s, Alco RS's composed the entire stable of some smaller railroads, such as the Rutland.

It's not for nothing that GP stands for "General Purpose" and SD "Special Duty": the SD's were supposed to be variants on the standard GP line!
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By the way, using compound nouns can avoid the use of a lot of prepositions.
Don't tell that to the Latin-loving grammar police!
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Old July 30th, 2015, 03:38 PM   #228
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Union Pacific Corporation (NYSE:UNP) is one of America’s leading transportation companies. Its principal operating company, Union Pacific Railroad, is North America’s premier railroad franchise, covering 23 states across the western two-thirds of the United States. Union Pacific Railroad has one of the most diversified commodity mixes in the industry, including chemicals, coal, consumer products, food and food products, forest products, grain and grain products, government, intermodal, metals, minerals, waste, and automobiles and parts. The Marketing and Sales group is organized into six major commodity groups, with finance and operational expertise within each group, in order to serve the specialized needs of each customer.

The men and women of Union Pacific are dedicated to serve. Our mission is focused on working for the good of the customers, shareholders, and one another and our commitment defines us and drives the economic strength of our company and our country. Performance is highly important to our company and our concentration and determination will drive our safety, customer satisfaction and quality results. Our reputation will always be a source of pride for our employees and a bond with our customers, shareholders, and community partners. We are all part of the same team, and working together to reach our common goals is one of our strengths. Communication and respect are the foundation of great teamwork.
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Old July 31st, 2015, 07:35 AM   #229
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Union Pacific Corporation (NYSE:UNP) is one of America’s leading transportation companies. Its principal operating company, Union Pacific Railroad, is North America’s premier railroad franchise, covering 23 states across the western two-thirds of the United States. Union Pacific Railroad has one of the most diversified commodity mixes in the industry, including chemicals, coal, consumer products, food and food products, forest products, grain and grain products, government, intermodal, metals, minerals, waste, and automobiles and parts. The Marketing and Sales group is organized into six major commodity groups, with finance and operational expertise within each group, in order to serve the specialized needs of each customer.

The men and women of Union Pacific are dedicated to serve. Our mission is focused on working for the good of the customers, shareholders, and one another and our commitment defines us and drives the economic strength of our company and our country. Performance is highly important to our company and our concentration and determination will drive our safety, customer satisfaction and quality results. Our reputation will always be a source of pride for our employees and a bond with our customers, shareholders, and community partners. We are all part of the same team, and working together to reach our common goals is one of our strengths. Communication and respect are the foundation of great teamwork.
There's something very British-sounding about this turn of phrase ...

Calling the Union Pacific Railroad an operating company? A franchise? Those are terms that sound at home when talking about UK railroading ...

(Also, incidentally, if my intuition is right and the BNSF is run by former Santa Fe guys, then they're probably the premier railroad in the US nowadays.)
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Old July 31st, 2015, 02:49 PM   #230
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Rail -- Rail Trench at Port of Vancouver by Washington State Dept of Transportation, on Flickr
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Old July 31st, 2015, 10:57 PM   #231
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Old July 31st, 2015, 11:01 PM   #232
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
The earliest diesels were designed to operate passenger, not freight, trains. For example, the B&O ordered one of the very first diesels, EMD's EA, to operate its principal name trains -- in part because (unlike its competitors) the railroad didn't have the resources to actually acquire new lightweight streamline equipment and instead simply rebuilt heavyweight equipment to look like it, therefore needing more powerful engines.



What seems to have happened is that early diesel road units were generally built on the E's successful model. EMD soon offered a four-axle variant, the FT; its major competitor, Alco, offered the lookalike PA-1 (six axles) and FA-1 (four-axles); and up to the early 1950s most mainline road diesels were produced from these designs.

What changed was when Alco had runaway success with the RS-1:



This design is called a road switcher. Early American switcher models were designed for yard work: they had low gearings and were designed to maximize visibility. The road switchers were built to have higher, road-speed gearings and added a comfort and safety hood on one side of the cab (it usually has a toilet inside). Essentially, it could do it all.

After a blunder or two, EMD rolled out its first successful road switcher model, the GP-7, about a decade after Alco had begun constructing its RS series.



Between EMD's aggressive marketing and the fact that its component parts are largely interchangeable with its E and F models (one could say the same about Alco's, but there were many many more E's and F's than PA's and FA's), the GP series soon became dominant in lighter branchline duty.

However, cab units would remain prevalent in mainline operations through midcentury. I would venture to suggest this is because late, heavy steam locomotives still moved bulk cargo while early diesels were largely assigned to priority freights; while six-axle road switcher power* was in existence from the start, its early purpose was to distribute the unit's weight over more axles for lighter-track branch lines.

Heavy, high-horsepower six-axle power did not catch on till the mid-60s, when EMD introduced the SD45:



This is the model that can be considered the "true ancestor" of modern American mainline power.
___________
* Check out that excellent example of a compound noun, by the way. This is English's version of the cargo-train compounds found in most Germanic languages.
By the way...

In 1967, ATSF (Santa Fe) purchased from EMD a special "streamliner" version of EMD SD45 called FP45, because the railroad didn't want its Super Chief passenger train pulled by a freight-style locomotive.




After Amtrak take almost all passenger trains in America, ATSF transferred all its FP45 for "high-speed" freight service Super C. Milwaukee Road also purchased five FP45 for passenger services.
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Old August 1st, 2015, 12:26 AM   #233
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The Classic Lineup Recreated: SP E9 #6051, UP E9 #951, And ATSF F7A #347C At The 50th Anniversary Of LAUPT by emd, on Flickr
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Old August 1st, 2015, 05:27 AM   #234
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Something a little different:
Terryville Redemption by chessiecat1997, on Flickr
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Pan Am Railways is headquartered in Iron Horse Park in North Billerica, Massachusetts. It is a subsidiary of Portsmouth, New Hampshire-based Pan Am Systems, formerly known as Guilford Transportation Industries (GTI). Guilford bought the name, colors and logo of Pan American World Airways in 1998.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan_Am_Railways
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that the temptation to commit wrong may be restrained by
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Old August 1st, 2015, 06:26 PM   #235
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Florida East Coast Railroad (FEC)



FEC 813 brings up the tail of 7 new FEC GEVO's in tow (810, 807, 811, 802, 801, 800 & 813) behind the road power of Q357-25 at Boughtonville, OH on their way to Willard where another train will forward them south to their new home in Florida.
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Old August 1st, 2015, 10:23 PM   #236
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Something a little different:
Terryville Redemption by chessiecat1997, on Flickr
Pan Am Railways has an old locomotive fleet.

Other Class II railroads have a more modern locomotive fleet. An example is one of my favorite American railroads: Iowa Interstate. It has 17 giant GE ES44AC.



The only stretch of Iowa Interstate is a former Rock Island track between Bureau, IL and Omaha, NE.

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Old August 2nd, 2015, 10:14 AM   #237
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By the way...

In 1967, ATSF (Santa Fe) purchased from EMD a special "streamliner" version of EMD SD45 called FP45, because the railroad didn't want its Super Chief passenger train pulled by a freight-style locomotive.

After Amtrak take almost all passenger trains in America, ATSF transferred all its FP45 for "high-speed" freight service Super C. Milwaukee Road also purchased five FP45 for passenger services.
That would be what is called an "asterisk".
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Originally Posted by Rodalvesdepaula View Post
Pan Am Railways has an old locomotive fleet.

Other Class II railroads have a more modern locomotive fleet. An example is one of my favorite American railroads: Iowa Interstate. It has 17 giant GE ES44AC.

The only stretch of Iowa Interstate is a former Rock Island track between Bureau, IL and Omaha, NE.
Well keep in mind that railroad length and terrain the lines go through, as well as the type of freight being moved (as well as the railroad's finances) can greatly change optimal line equipment.

Florida East Coast runs intermodal traffic along a very straight, direct route. Iowa Interstate runs ... I'm not entirely sure what ... but it's also over a very straight, direct route. Both are conditions optimized for the running of Class I-like services.

By contrast, the Class II's in the Northeast and New England rarely run straight direct routes. Instead, the mainlines are relatively short, significantly older and curvier, and branch heavily -- all conditions favoring four-axle power over six-axle power.

Pan Am Railways' system map (linked because the image is farking huge)

But the catch is that the last major four-axle freight unit EMD offered was the GP60 (and AFAIK there are no four-axle GE Evolution Series models; the Providence & Worcester has several Dash 8-40B's and BW's which might actually be the last four-axle freight model GE offered), which means that railroads where conditions favor four-axle power generally have to make do essentially replacing prime movers on frames and bodyshells that date from 20 to 40 years ago.
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Old August 2nd, 2015, 03:06 PM   #238
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Hum, It's true. Railroad tracks in New England are very old and they haven't capacity and clearance to receive big locomotives such as EMD SD70 and GE GEVO.

Iowa Traction Railway is still operating its very old Interurban-syle electric locomotives?


http://www.nycsubway.org/wiki/Iowa_-...action_in_Iowa
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Old August 4th, 2015, 02:49 AM   #239
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UNITED STATES | Freight

Will brookville or mpi make 4 axle road units in the future, perhaps around a genset design?

If not them maybe we'll see us variants of those Australia/Africa export units GE and EMD make?

I know the port of Houston has caterpillar made locos too
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Old August 4th, 2015, 06:00 AM   #240
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Will brookville or mpi make 4 axle road units in the future, perhaps around a genset design?

If not them maybe we'll see us variants of those Australia/Africa export units GE and EMD make?

I know the port of Houston has caterpillar made locos too
Good question!

One of the reasons new four-axle power isn't being pursued is because there are still so many GP38s and GP40s around. Indeed, very few SD40s* relative to the original fleet have ever been retired -- they continue to form the backbone of many Class II fleets (such as the Wheeling & Lake Erie) and secondary services even on the Class I's. A clear industrial design triumph if ever there was one! These units were manufactured by the same company at the same time time as the original Chevrolet Camarro.

But this also means that they are, on average, 40-45 years old. First-generation diesels (particularly Alcos) largely began being pushed out of service and into retirement in the 90s and early 2000s when they were (on average) some fifty years old. Their sheer age augurs increased failure rates which in turn augurs fleet cannibalization.** GP- and SD50s were not as well designed and are largely out of service and there are few four-axle units dating after ca. 1985 which would seem to imply that Class II's reliant on four-axle power, like Pan Am (where GP40s make up some 60% of the road's fleet and 40s in general 80%!) will start needing to look for replacements in the not-too-distant future.

I'd also like to point out that EMD's Class 66 (which uses the same 710 prime mover as the SD70 series) and GE's PowerHaul (which uses a different prime mover than the Evolution Series') -- are both "light" six-axle units. It'll be interesting to see whether anybody's going to offer brand-new four-axle power instead of aftermarket conversion kits (e.g. the GP22ECO, which is a GP40 refitted with a 710 prime mover***).
_______________
* Another interesting asterisk: The SD40, which is of the same vintage as the SD45, is quite literally a GP40 engine and body on an SD45 frame, perhaps the ultimate expression of early road switchers using three-axle trucks for better load distribution; the SD45 series was meant to be the mainline diesel. Even so, the SD40 massively outsold the SD45 and became the standard mainline diesel into the '80s, when the short-lived SD50 and longer-lived SD60 and SD70 series (and especially GE's Dashes and AC series) replaced them.

** Although EMD is apparently still producing parts for these things.

*** Part of this is that the conversion takes a surprising horsepower hit. GP40's develop 3,000 horses (2.24 MW) while GP22ECO's develop 2,150 horses (1.60 MW), a 30% power hit and one that makes the GP22ECO's more like a first generation unit under the hood than a second-generation one.
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