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Old August 4th, 2015, 09:06 AM   #241
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Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
I'd also like to point out that EMD's Class 66 (which uses the same 710 prime mover as the SD70 series) and GE's PowerHaul (which uses a different prime mover than the Evolution Series') -- are both "light" six-axle units.
Any European locomotive is 'light' compared to it's North American counterpart, because of it's axle load limitation somewhere in the 20t to 22.5t per axle range today, even down to 17t per axle in the past (like the Deltic). As far as I know there is just one line in Europe having a higher then 22.5t axle load, the Malmbanan in the north of Sweden and Norway. They don't use diesel but electric traction by Bombardier there. North American locos are known to exceed 33t per axle.
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Old August 4th, 2015, 09:20 AM   #242
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I guess another way of looking at this is to ask what the typical class II or III railroad is actually hauling these days and what they plan on doing long-term with their increasingly ancient infrastructure. That would probably inform how they would want to invest in new power. Or rather more likely what a locomotive leasing company might invest in.

Shortlines by their nature do tend to serve classic line side industries and warehouses as well as local team track sidings. On the other hand I can think of many smaller US railroads that exist to haul heavy bulk unit trains and basically everything else the big boys carry except maybe intermodal and autoracks. And I've noticed public money subsidizing improvements to old local railroads. See the rebuilding of the old Northwestern Pacific in California. When it comes to the latter heavy haul, improved regional railroads I wonder if a point would come where they would utilize basically the same equipment as the class I's.

While the older rickety branch line regional railroads would decay to nothing. I never read anything good about the state of railroads in, say, Maine. Every year another paper mill up there closes and another segment of Pan Am/Guilford/Whatever shuts down for good as well. Of course we are talking about a negligible part of the overall very robust North American network here, but just saying.

So...where are the highway worthy trackmobiles? Seems like an obvious idea for industrial switching or even short to medium length branches where there is only one source of very infrequent traffic like you might find in New England. They'd drive around and do industrial switching jobs, leaving a bigger locomotive to simply collect the cars and continue down the line. Perhaps the need for the road switcher could go away?

Also who knows if in the future bulk containers will be more of a thing, with hydraulic dumpers and the works. What they lack in capacity compared to a ACFX hopper or something like that they gain in being portable. With google making robot cars, well surely there will be robot trucks. Robot trucks that can sort of transform into a train like the road railers of the recent past. Remove the cost of transloading, give local rail a new shot in the arm. Trains will always have the advantage of running on steel rails with a tenth the friction of the most advanced tire that can be made and can weight a whole lot, now you have true intermodal working together.
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Old August 4th, 2015, 11:38 AM   #243
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M-NL View Post
Any European locomotive is 'light' compared to it's North American counterpart, because of it's axle load limitation somewhere in the 20t to 22.5t per axle range today, even down to 17t per axle in the past (like the Deltic). As far as I know there is just one line in Europe having a higher then 22.5t axle load, the Malmbanan in the north of Sweden and Norway. They don't use diesel but electric traction by Bombardier there. North American locos are known to exceed 33t per axle.
Axle Loads for Some Common First- and Second-Generation Road Switchers (in metric tons):

1. Alco RS-1: 112.3 t/ 4 axles = 28.08 t/axle
2. Alco RS-3: 112.1 t/ 4 axles = 28.03 t/axle
3. Alco RSC-3: 115.6 t/ 6 axles = 19.27 t/axle
4. Alco RSD-15: 152.0 t/ 6 axles = 25.33 t/axle
5. EMD GP7: 111.6 t/4 axles = 27.90 t/axle
6. EMD SD7: 140.2 t/ 6 axles = 23.37 t/axle
7. EMD GP38-2: 113.4 t/ 4 axles = 28.35 t/axle
8. EMD GP40-2: 113.4 t/ 4 axles = 28.35 t/axle
9. EMD SD40-2: 116.9 t/ 6 axles = 27.82 t/axle
10. EMD SD45: 116.9 t/ 6 axles = 27.82 t/axle

Average axle load: 26.43 t/axle

While I'll grant that power since the 1990s has become exceptionally heavy (for example, the AC4400CW's axle load is 32.2 t, significantly heavier than its SD40-2 and SD45 predecessors), and that the observable trend in North American diesels is clearly towards higher axle loads, the fact of the matter is that the units being used on the railroads in question (e.g. Pan Am, Providence & Worcester, Buffalo & Pittsburgh, Reading & Northern, and countless other Class II's and shortlines that don't run trunk services) are significantly lighter than the ones the Class I's use on their trunk lines.

BTW for comparison, the Class 66 achieves an axle load of 21.15 t and the PowerHaul approximately (there's a wide weight variation) 21.5 t, which is indeed much lighter than what's being built in America today but is actually in the same axle load range as first-generation (RSC-3, SD7) six-axle road switchers as has been shown.
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Old August 4th, 2015, 07:00 PM   #244
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Gas Turbine #61

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Old August 4th, 2015, 07:46 PM   #245
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Cool! Is that the last "normal" electric freight operation in the US? There are dedicated coal lines in Arizona and Texas with catenary and electric locomotives but they are shortand only marginally connected to the rest of the national network so I usually don't keep them in mind. Plus they are almost impossible to photograph since they are on restricted private property so you don't normally see train nerd stuff about them.

Iowa is an interesting state in some respects despite seeming pretty lame, IMO. There's little obscure things like this off the back roads worth checking out if you are into that kind of road trip traveling.
Excuse me
These locomotives do not work anymore.
What did happen with these electric freight lines?
Have been closed? or now only runs with diesel trains?


Origin of the photo: Railpictures
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Old August 4th, 2015, 08:11 PM   #246
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I believe that is the Northeast Corridor.

It doesn't have electric freight anymore, but I don't know why.

Actually to me the fact that it has freight at all is kind of a problem, that is one factor why Amtrak can't easily make the line true high speed rail.
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Old August 4th, 2015, 08:32 PM   #247
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That's the Northeast Corridor.

Those units were E44s, probably the last mainline freight unit built in the United States.

Conrail abandoned its electric freight operations in the early 1980s. The main reason is that its traffic patterns had shifted from the Amtrak-owned passenger-intensive route. Trains from Chicago to New York utilize a different mainline via Reading and the Lehigh Valley, today Norfolk Southern's Harrisburg Line.

Most freight service on the NEC today is terminal freight -- that is, it uses the NEC as a "last mile" between its own tracks and its destination.
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Old August 5th, 2015, 01:22 AM   #248
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Almost all traffic in NEC is formed by Amtrak and commuter trains. Freight trains are rare in NEC, only to access some yards and branches.
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Old August 5th, 2015, 04:45 AM   #249
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EMD GP30, one of best diesel-electric locomotives ever built in the America, with an unique style.

GM Automotive Styling Center helped EMD to design this locomotive.




High Short Hood version for Southern Railway and Norfolk & Western. These two railroads purchased only high short hood locomotives for safety reasons.

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Old August 5th, 2015, 10:02 AM   #250
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Interestingly UPS was founded in a basement in Seattle's Pioneer Square. I think I have a picture somewhere of the garden the Casey Foundation built on the site.
Was in Pioneer Square today and took pictures of the garden which the Casey Foundation funded to honor the site on which UPS was founded (1907). A pleasant oasis amidst a teeming neighborhood







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Old August 6th, 2015, 07:40 AM   #251
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BNSF 7520 GE ES44DC in Mojave Desert



http://www.cnbc.com/2015/05/02/ett-i...nsfs-rose.html

http://www.cnbc.com/2015/02/28/berks...al-letter.html
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Old August 6th, 2015, 03:33 PM   #252
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What a great photo!
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Old August 6th, 2015, 04:24 PM   #253
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TRAIN – PENNSYLVANIA DIESEL ENGINE AND FREIGHT TRAIN – c1960 | CHUCKMAN'S PHOTOS ON WORDPRESS: CHICAGO NOSTALGIA AND MEMORABILIA

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Old August 7th, 2015, 01:20 AM   #254
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EMD F7A.
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Old August 7th, 2015, 03:19 AM   #255
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BEEP, a Baldwin diesel-electric switcher locomotive with an EMD 567 diesel engine and EMD GP7 long hood.




http://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/topic/w...its-not-a-beep

This locomotive was built by Baldwin in 1943 during war effort to ATSF. In December 1970, ATSF rebuilt the locomotive with a new EMD 567 engine and a new long hood at same style of EMD GP7. Original Baldwin control cab wasn't modified. Because these modifications, the locomotive was nicknamed BEEP.


Nowadays, BEEP is in Western America Railroad Museum in Barstow, CA.
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Old August 7th, 2015, 07:42 AM   #256
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Resting in the roundhouse by Mike Danneman, on Flickr
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Inside the Cheyenne, Wyoming, roundhouse on March 25, 2013, Union Pacific’s two E9As wait for another season of pulling passenger trains. Both were built in 1955, and in the early ’90s, UP sent them to VMV Enterprises in Paducah, Kentucky, to be remanufactured. They emerged in 1993 with a new 16-cylinder 2,000-hp EMD 645 engine (replacing original twin 12-cylinder 1,200-hp 567 engines), with AR10 alternators and GP38-2 design electrical systems.
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Old August 7th, 2015, 04:05 PM   #257
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Union Pacific Ore Train from Moab



Union Pacific Ore Train from Moab, Utah. Two locomotives in front, two on the back. Just out of the Moab fault pass.
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Old August 8th, 2015, 04:17 AM   #258
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Time to Hop Back Aboard CSX



Flat revenue has forced CSX to lower costs, improve service, and develop new initiatives. As coal prices stabilize, its shares are poised to barrel ahead. Mike Groll/AP Photo
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Old August 8th, 2015, 04:55 AM   #259
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TRAIN – PENNSYLVANIA DIESEL ENGINE AND FREIGHT TRAIN – c1960 | CHUCKMAN'S PHOTOS ON WORDPRESS: CHICAGO NOSTALGIA AND MEMORABILIA

Actually, it is two E-7s on a mail train. The boxcar is actually an express car with high speed trucks and steam and air signal lines for use with other baggage and passenger cars. There would be 1 or 2 coaches in the train for passenger use.
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Old August 9th, 2015, 03:24 PM   #260
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The Norfolk Southern Railway



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