daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old May 8th, 2009, 07:05 PM   #101
sotonsi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,547

There's quite a few short stretches in the UK - a bit of the Coventry ring road is D6, for instance, but it's weaving lanes.

In addition to the M2 between the M3 and M5 in Belfast, the M25 from the M3 to the M4, and a bit of the M8 in Glasgow, there are 2 other ten+ lane motorway setups outside of junctions:
M20 is 2-3-3-2 between j5 and j6 (seperate junctions with c/d lanes)
M60 is 2-3-3-2 between j6 and j8 (1-3-3-1 through j7)
sotonsi está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old May 9th, 2009, 03:07 AM   #102
Comfortably Numb
Goddess of Winter
 
Comfortably Numb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Rochester NY
Posts: 2,521
Likes (Received): 309

Quote:
Originally Posted by sotonsi View Post
There's quite a few short stretches in the UK - a bit of the Coventry ring road is D6, for instance, but it's weaving lanes.

In addition to the M2 between the M3 and M5 in Belfast, the M25 from the M3 to the M4, and a bit of the M8 in Glasgow, there are 2 other ten+ lane motorway setups outside of junctions:
M20 is 2-3-3-2 between j5 and j6 (seperate junctions with c/d lanes)
M60 is 2-3-3-2 between j6 and j8 (1-3-3-1 through j7)
The M8 in Glasgow is one monster motorway/freeway....there's a section of it (where it merges with another motorway) that reminded me of the 401 in Toronto....so many lanes.
__________________
There is no pain, you are receding
A distant ship smoke on the horizon
You are only coming through in waves
Your lips move but I can't hear what you're saying


My Panoramio
Comfortably Numb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 9th, 2009, 06:05 PM   #103
Dahlis
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 837
Likes (Received): 107

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Then why is a nice suburban home, with a nice yard, good schools, low crime, low traffic etc considered better by many?
The best schools are found in the inner city, the most expensive places to live is in the inner city. Crime should not be a problem anywhere in the city unless your city is badly run down.

Im not saying suburban homes are bad, they can be really good its the planning that often is flawed in suburban areas.
Dahlis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2009, 06:54 AM   #104
hoosier
Registered User
 
hoosier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,446
Likes (Received): 58

Quote:
Originally Posted by H123Laci View Post
and where do you get the money from?
(PT is extremely expensive...)
So are urban freeways. Plus, freeways consume more ROW and rip the hearts out of city centers. Many American inner cities were decimated by freeway construction.
__________________
R.I.P. Moke- my best bud
hoosier no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2009, 07:03 AM   #105
hoosier
Registered User
 
hoosier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,446
Likes (Received): 58

Racism drove many white people out of the inner cities in the 50s and 60s, and the construction of the interstate highway system helped spur the exodus. Plus, there were massive race riots in just about every major U.S. city after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968, which led businesses to flee the inner city.

Land use policies at the local level encourage, and in some cases, mandate low density development.

It is not a matter of what individuals want, but what is needed to conserve the Earth's resources and protect the environment that should dictate land use and development throughout the world. Low-density sprawl is a temporary phenomenon abetted by cheap oil. The new economic and environmental realities confronting mankind will dictate a reversal of sprawl.
__________________
R.I.P. Moke- my best bud
hoosier no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2009, 09:39 PM   #106
alekssa1
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,993
Likes (Received): 1790

--

Last edited by alekssa1; May 10th, 2009 at 10:48 PM.
alekssa1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 11th, 2009, 02:01 AM   #107
VisualEye
Registered User
 
VisualEye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 9
Likes (Received): 0

Don't forget the E17/R1 Ring Road in Antwerp, Belgium!

That ring road motorway have up to six lanes each direction, but some of these 5x5 / 6x6 lanes only last a few km's that's all.

I went through Antwerp via E17 once on both directions on the way to Amsterdam in Nov 1995. I was not sure if it was actually 5 to 6 lanes at that time (1995), but I think these probably used to be just 4x4 lanes but I can't remember because I did not got a clearer view of the motorway from inside the coach.

Here are quite good few videos of driving through some section of E17 for you to look.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuHJv6-E0HU

www.youtube.com/watch?v=CamWKC25xRs (This is probably the best one so far, cleanest view of multi-lanes motorway despite some dirty spots on windscreen of the lorry.)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixM4Nbnni3k
__________________
Oil Price Crisis? Go free by cycling!
Food Price Crisis? Go free by grow your own food!
VisualEye no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 11th, 2009, 10:45 AM   #108
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,590
Likes (Received): 19377

Quote:
Originally Posted by KIWIKAAS View Post

Helped by standard oil's buy up of streetcar lines and subsequently closing them.
That happened everywhere. Even the Netherlands used to have a major rural tram network, most of them were closed before the 1940's. Todays standards of something being cost-efficient are a bit different than they used to be in the 1800's and early 1900's. Most American and European rail networks were build for a population and travellers potential that would be seen as insufficient today to construct a railway for.
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 11th, 2009, 09:20 PM   #109
Dahlis
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 837
Likes (Received): 107

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
That happened everywhere. Even the Netherlands used to have a major rural tram network, most of them were closed before the 1940's. Todays standards of something being cost-efficient are a bit different than they used to be in the 1800's and early 1900's. Most American and European rail networks were build for a population and travellers potential that would be seen as insufficient today to construct a railway for.
The Stockholm tram network was closed for completely different reasons, it was replaced with a pretty extensive underground metro system. Today however tramlines and light rail is making a comeback and new lines are planned throughout the region.
Dahlis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2009, 05:07 AM   #110
brisavoine
BANNED
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: desconocida
Posts: 18,049
Likes (Received): 2346

Metropolitan has already shown satellite pictures, but here are some close-up pictures of some of the biggest motorways/freeways in Greater Paris. Very few pictures are available unfortunately.

The 10-lane A4 motorway in the eastern suburbs of Paris:
image hosted on flickr


The A1 motorway in the nothern suburbs of Paris is also quite something, but they have divided it into four separate bits, which I have always found particularly annoying. They seem to consider that motorists are too stupid to be left to choose their lane.




There is also an 11-lane section on the A15 in the northwestern suburbs, but this is the only crappy picture that I could find. There are six lanes on this side of the motorway, and five lanes on the other side (cars coming in the opposite direction). This section is incredibly busy during rush hours.


This big motorway offers incredible views of Greater Paris, but foreign visitors are usually totally unaware of it because it links only Central Paris to the northwestern suburbs, and it doesn't even branch off the Périphérique, so people coming from foreign countries almost never use this motorway unless they are specifically going to the northwestern suburbs, and returning from them (view below):
brisavoine no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium