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Old July 9th, 2008, 05:21 PM   #241
arenn
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http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dl...INESS/80709030

Tech firm to expand in Carmel, add 250 jobs
By Laura Olson
Posted: July 9, 2008

Technology developer and supplier Telamon Corp. today said it plans to expand its international headquarters in Carmel and double in size.

At a news conference, executives with the 259-employee company said they will hire 250 workers by 2012.
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The company provides of products and services ranging from the development of wireless information technology systems to integrated supply chain management and high-tech assembly services.

The company will invest more than $3 million to upgrade its technical support, engineering and logistics operations at the company's suburban Indianapolis corporate complex.

The Indiana Economic Development Corporation offered Telamon up to $1.25 million in performance-based tax credits and up to $230,000 in training grants based on the company's job creation plans.

Carmel will consider property tax abatement at the request of the Hamilton County Alliance and the Indy Partnership.

"This is not a free gift. We still have to work hard," said Albert Chen, the chief executive officer who founded the company in 1985.

Gov. Mitch Daniels and Carmel Mayor Jim Brainard attended the news conference.

"We understand when we work with companies that there are choices" as far as where they choose to locate, Brainard said. "That's our competition, the rest of the world."
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Old July 10th, 2008, 04:55 AM   #242
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More good news for Carmel.
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Old September 24th, 2008, 04:47 AM   #243
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http://www.indianaeconomicdigest.net...rticleID=43375

American Funds parent may add 500 workers in Carmel

Indianapolis Business Journal

By Norm Heikens, The IBJ

nheikens@ibj.com

Capital Group Cos., the Los Angeles-based parent of mutual fund giant American Funds, said today that it plans to add enough space at its 24-acre campus in Carmel to support an additional 500 employees.

If the privately held company were to fill the new buildings, total employment would come to 1,500 - a 50-percent boost.

A Capital Group spokeswoman downplayed the $50 million announcement, saying the workers would be hired gradually after January 2010, when the buildings are scheduled to be occupied.

Still, the expansion would amount to a large swell in the back-office operation.

American Funds currently operates from a 106,000-square-foot building at 12911 N. Meridian St. that it acquired last year from Opus North Corp., a Minneapolis developer, and another site at Keystone Crossing.

Capital Group said the $50 million expansion would allow it to move the Keystone workers to Carmel and create capacity for the additional workers.

The company plans to build a five-story, 175,000-square-foot office building and a one-story mail-processing center with 32,000 square feet. Both will be connected to the existing building.
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Old October 16th, 2008, 02:23 PM   #244
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http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dl...509/-1/ARCHIVE

Cost overruns hit Carmel projects
Arts center gets $45M more; Keystone upgrades need an extra $50M
By Melanie D. Hayes
Posted: October 16, 2008

They are two major public projects, both designed to improve the quality of life in what is already one of the area's most desirable cities.

But now Carmel's state-of-the-art Performing Arts Center and its ambitious and innovative Keystone Avenue reconstruction have something else in common: Each project appears poised to cost taxpayers tens of millions of dollars more than they were told -- up to $95 million extra.

Mayor Jim Brainard received unanimous approval Wednesday night from the city's redevelopment commission to allocate another $45 million to finish work on the Performing Arts Center. He also confirmed that he would ask the City Council to approve an additional $50 million bond to complete the Keystone project.

Brainard promised during last year's re-election campaign that the city would not exceed the $90 million Carmel received from the state to improve Keystone Avenue. But he now acknowledges the project has become much more expensive than anticipated, primarily because of increased construction costs.

The Keystone project eliminates traffic lights at six intersections along the important commuter artery into Indianapolis, a way to improve safety and traffic.

Brainard was expected to make his pitch at a future council meeting. He insisted the city had enough bonding capacity to avoid increasing tax payments.

Brainard asked the redevelopment commission Wednesday night for the extra $45 million for what was an $80 million Performing Arts Center. It will include a 1,600-seat concert hall and a 500-seat theater.

Brainard said that increased construction costs were again a driving factor, and he acknowledged that he is proposing $8.5 million in enhancements to the theater.

The mayor hopes, however, that community fundraising will offset some of the added cost to the Performing Arts Center.

The news was not a shock to council members and commissioners, who said they had heard that both projects needed infusions of cash.

"I have been told for a fact, that at this point in time, the mayor is unable to complete the project because there are not enough funds available," said Carmel City Council President Rick Sharp. "It's very troubling. It's very troubling that we have these two major projects that end up being such a wide miss of the mark."

Last year, the Indiana Department of Transportation paid Carmel $90 million to take control of Keystone from 96th Street to north of 136th Street. Brainard decided to use the entire amount to replace six intersections with roundabout-style interchanges.

"Our goal was to keep it there (at $90 million), but costs and the economy have made that impossible," Brainard said Monday.

"Costs have gone up tremendously," the mayor said. "Gasoline costs are an example of that. A lot of asphalt is petroleum-based. Dirt moving is done with fuel-powered big trucks. We've had huge changes in costs that were not anticipated."

The state gave Carmel $50 million in 2007 as a first installment. Of that, about $22.1 million has been spent and another $23.7 million was committed for contractual work as of Monday, according to documents provided by the clerk-treasurer's office. About $4.1 million, plus interest, is still available.

The state is scheduled to give the city another $20 million in February 2009 and again in 2010.

The city is working on the intersections at 106th and 126th streets, which are costing about $20 million each, Brainard said.

The bidding process started Wednesday for parts of the 116th Street, Carmel Drive and 136th Street intersections.

Councilman Eric Seidensticker asked the mayor at the Oct. 6 City Council meeting to explain the project's financial status at a future meeting.

"We need to understand how it is possible that we can be so far off from the original estimate," he said.

"When you miss a project by 50 percent," Seidensticker said, "that's big."

The mayor points to the project's uniqueness as another factor in the underestimated budget.

"No one's done a project quite like this in the United States," Brainard said. "There are a lot of unknowns when doing something for the first time."

Sharp said it was clear in May that there were insufficient funds to complete the project.

"He (Brainard) approached me with a number that is about half of what seems to be the number today. I told him at the time I would have a difficult time supporting that."

Linda Wesolowski, 60, Carmel, believes it's "par for the course" for any public project in any city to go over budget, but she still wonders how the bid could have been missed by 50 percent.

Still, she wouldn't mind paying higher taxes to get the Keystone project done.

"Carmel has got the lowest tax rate in the nine-county area," she said. "Something had to be done about Keystone. . . . Even with the work on just two intersections, it is speeding up traffic (flow)."

When Brainard approached him about funding the road construction with $90 million, Sharp said, he asked the mayor whether that was going to be enough.

"His straight answer -- 'Yes, I think so.' I can give him wiggle room to 'think.' If someone was coming back now needing $10 million, that's 10 or 11 percent. Anybody can be off by 10 percent. . . . But we are talking 50 percent or more. That's reckless. Someone was reckless along the way, and I don't know who."

Sharp thinks construction on some of the interchanges could possibly be delayed until the money is available, even if it takes several years.

"The thing I've said consistently is, it's a great vision. . . . but if we don't have the money to do it, maybe it's a vision that needs to be scaled back."

One option Sharp proposed to the mayor was to eliminate the plans to reconstruct the intersections at 116th Street and Carmel Drive.

There are other financial challenges facing the city that are more imminent than Keystone, Sharp said.

"I don't want him to take us down a path, like with the concert hall, where we have very few options except to go for additional funds," he said.

Sharp believes the commission's hands were tied with the Performing Arts Center because construction has already begun, whereas parts of the Keystone project could be pushed back.

"Sometimes the only solution is to find additional funding, and in this case (the arts center), I'm convinced of that," he said. "I'm not convinced of that with Keystone."
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Old November 7th, 2008, 03:48 AM   #245
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http://www.indystar.com/article/2008...1150/LOCAL0101

Skepticism persists over Keystone
By Heather Gillers
Posted: November 6, 2008

Carmel City Council members are taking their time to decide whether to bail the mayor out of a $50 million budget gap, after dozens of vocal constituents weighed in on the issue this week.

About 100 residents showed up to criticize, support or simply listen Monday to Mayor Jim Brainard's plan to spend up to $50 million on Keystone Avenue, a road project originally slated to cost the city nothing. City Council members say dozens of other residents have stopped them in the street to express their views or weighed in by e-mail.
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The mayor, who originally promised he could rebuild Keystone with the $90 million the state is paying Carmel to take over the road, detailed the history of the project at Monday's meeting.

The mayor had hoped council members would use the meeting to pledge the additional funding. But that measure did not have the support of enough council members to be added to the meeting agenda at the last minute. Its sponsor, council member Ron Carter, said he had no immediate plans to reintroduce it.

Council President Rick Sharp said hearing the mayor's presentation underlined the importance of careful consideration.

"We're in the position that we are due to hasty action with incomplete information," he said.

Brainard argued that public safety and quality-of-life improvements are worth using city money to plug the funding gap.

"It's not simply spending money," Brainard said. "It's wisely investing to avoid future problems."

Feelings about the project, which would replace six Keystone intersections with roundabout-style interchanges, varied widely. About two dozen residents and business owners were split between concern over reckless spending, and cautious approval for an infusion of cash into the Keystone project.

"I think it's a good project," resident Ian Smith told the council. "But I think old-fashioned ideas of not spending more money than you have should come into play."

The mayor insisted the additional money could be found without affecting taxes. He promised that his current cost estimate is based on firmer data than the original guess. He said delaying the project would aggravate traffic during the state's planned work on U.S. 31 and would disrupt access to businesses during the 2009 holiday shopping season.

Of the $50 million the state has so far allocated to Carmel for work on Keystone, about $44.6 million had been committed to the reconstruction project as of the end of September, according to records from the clerk-treasurer's office. Brainard now predicts the project will cost between $130 million and $142 million. But the next installment of state funding is not expected to arrive until next year.

Resident Tom Kendall compared the added expense to costly and unexpected automobile repairs: unfortunate, but not worth abandoning the car.

"Keystone Avenue was a good project a couple years ago," he said, "and it's a good project now."

The cost overrun was harder to overlook for resident Bill Styring, who saw it as part of a pattern. Only a few weeks ago, the Carmel Redevelopment Commission agreed to give Brainard up to $45 million extra to finish a partly constructed Performing Arts Center. That project was originally supposed to cost the city $80 million.

"What bothers me is we seem to be getting into these bait-and-switches," Styring said. "We get these projects started, and then we almost have to finish them."
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Old November 14th, 2008, 03:31 PM   #246
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http://www.indystar.com/article/2008...1150/LOCAL0101

A pedestrian-friendly Carmel?
Mayor would like to see city more interconnected
By Melanie D. Hayes
Posted: November 14, 2008

Strong infrastructure, walking areas, public transportation and a community unified with its downtown is how Carmel Mayor Jim Brainard envisions the future.

Speaking to the largest crowd ever gathered for a State of the City address, Brainard outlined the city's outlook for 312 people during a Carmel Chamber of Commerce luncheon Wednesday at the Ritz Charles.

"Instead of dwelling on what happened in the last decade . . . I want to look ahead. It is especially important in this time of economic uncertainty to look ahead," said Brainard, who's recently come under fire for budget shortfalls on two major city projects.

The mayor said he wants to see Carmel become more interconnected and more people walking instead of driving.

"The average household drives 100 miles a day," he said. "A lot of it is because they designed the city in a way that you have to."

Brainard would like to give families the choice of driving only five to 10 miles a day.

"We need to provide options," he said Thursday in a follow-up interview. "As we redevelop Old Town, we should design it in a way that people can walk or make short trips."

Having so many cars on highways and roads increases maintenance and reconstruction costs.

He also hopes to start a public transportation system in a couple of years.

The city has more than 1,200 hotel rooms, mostly along the Pennsylvania Street corridor, and a shuttle would benefit guests.

"We are thinking of starting a circulator -- and there are lots of federal funds for that," he said. "The shuttle would go in a circle from the hotels to Old Town to Clay Terrace and back. About 700 to 800 people stay in the hotels every night, and many of them don't have a car. This would help get them to the Arts & Design District and Clay Terrace."

The city has to determine the best possible route to benefit the most people and businesses.

"We don't want to set something up where we have a shuttle with one or two riders," he said. "We need to plan this carefully . . . so it is not a financial drain."

He's exploring federal avenues to fund a public transportation system.

"We want to make sure taxes do not increase," he said. "We are being careful. But Carmel does need transportation in the center core."

In the meantime, Brainard wants to keep working on the roads, specifically completing Keystone Avenue, where he plans to replace six intersections with roundabout-style interchanges.

That's one of the projects with a shortfall. The mayor needs $50 million to finish it, but City Council members are weighing their options. The Performing Arts Center is the other project with a shortfall, but the Carmel Redevelopment Commission has approved an additional $45 million to complete the project.

Brainard touted the city's many roundabouts during his speech by saying they're cheaper to build and safer for drivers.

He also wants to keep drawing new businesses to the city's center. The added density would speed up the creation of a public transportation system.

It costs about $8 million to reconstruct a mile of road in the county, he said, and it makes more financial sense to not stray too far from the center.

"In the long run, it's much less expensive to redevelop the inner city areas than to go farther out in the city," Brainard said. "We will continue to focus on redevelopment in the center."

Donna Franklin, a vice president of Noblesville Community Bank, attended both the Carmel and Noblesville State of the City luncheons. Both mayors had positive outlooks.

"(Brainard) was enthusiastic, positive," she said. "But you have to remember, we are all in Hamilton County and are blessed to be here. We are not as affected (by the economic downturn). But, some small businesses are (affected) in Small Town, U.S.A., or Middle Town, U.S.A."

Carmel Chamber President Mo Merhoff thought it was comforting to hear the mayor be so positive about the city's future.

"Optimism' is not being used with the economy," she said. "You don't hear those two words together, and there's a good reason for that. . . . But Carmel stands better, at least in the mayor's view."
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Old November 14th, 2008, 03:43 PM   #247
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Talking about a mayor that actually understands the big picture.
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 03:13 PM   #248
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http://www.indystar.com/article/2008...380/-1/ARCHIVE

Council seeks review of street project
Panel tables vote on $28.5M for Keystone roundabouts
By Heather Gillers
Posted: December 2, 2008

With a third of the Keystone Avenue reconstruction under way and half the money spent, the Carmel City Council got its first official say Monday on the ambitious road project.

Its message? Back up and slow down.

Council President Rick Sharp directed two council committees to examine how money has been spent so far before voting on a $28.5 million bailout for what Mayor Jim Brainard billed as a $90 million reconstruction.

"We have substantially missed the mark," Sharp said. "I think we need to understand why."

He directed the council's Finance Committee to examine past spending and suggested the Utilities and Transportation Committee huddle with project engineers to study how construction has unfolded.

Brainard said making information available to council members is a priority.

"The city engineer's door is always open," he said.

Since the project was announced two years ago, Brainard has controlled the revenue stream, the $90 million the state gave Carmel to take over a 4.2-mile stretch of Keystone. The question of moving forward did not come up before the council until last month, when Brainard announced he had underestimated the cost and would need city money to finish the road.

He first proposed sinking up to $50 million more into the project. When the council balked, two members floated the $28.5 million proposal.

One of those members, Finance Committee Chairwoman Luci Snyder, said the $28.5 million proposal was introduced in part to open council discussion and could be modified significantly. One alternative is for the city to advance Brainard the remainder of the state money, which is paid out in installments ending in 2010, then scale down costs to stay within the original $90 million price tag. Another option is to use money already earmarked for other areas -- likely other road projects -- to keep the city out of debt.

Brainard said he did not know whether $28.5 million would be sufficient to finish the project and declined to speculate on how much of the road could be completed with the original $90 million. He said last month the project could cost up to $142 million.

If the council allocates additional funds, Snyder said, "We'd like to put strings on this money. We don't want to be here in a year facing another shortfall."

The project seeks to replace six Keystone Avenue intersections with roundabouts. Hints that Carmel was spending more money than it had date back almost two years.

A preliminary construction estimate from February 2007 projects the cost at $112 million to $138.6 million, and communications by council members suggest at least some knew by last spring that the road was running over budget.

Several council members said they did not speak out earlier because they did not control funding for the project and did not have information showing the scope of the cost problem.

"Nowhere will you find my name signed on any document saying, 'This is what we are going to do,' because it never came in front of the council," Councilman Eric Seidensticker said.

He could not immediately recall receiving a February e-mail that Snyder said she sent to council members relaying the mayor's prediction that the Keystone project was running $10 million to $15 million over budget.

Seidensticker said informal predictions he heard did not give him enough information to speak out.

"You can't make a public statement about something you don't know the inner workings of," he said.

Asked when the council knew Keystone Avenue could end up costing more than its $90 million price tag, Brainard said it depends on the council member.

"I think some of them have been very diligent," he said. "Some of them may not have asked the right questions."
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 03:13 PM   #249
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http://www.indystar.com/article/2008...8/1268/ARCHIVE

Carmel council OKs fund transfer for Monon Center
Carmel City Council approves transfer of $650,000 to cover operating costs
By Melanie D. Hayes
Posted: December 2, 2008

Amid Carmel's plans for bailing out the Keystone road project and the Performing Arts Center, the City Council voted Monday to help the Monon Center out of its financial shortfall.

In September, the Carmel Clay Parks Board and Parks Department told city and township officials that the lavish Monon Center -- with its fitness center, aquatics park and community classes -- was operating in the red. At that time, parks director Mark Westermeier said the center needed $600,000 to get through the rest of the year.

The City Council voted 7-0 Monday to approve a resolution allowing the Parks Board to transfer $650,000 from its capital fund to its operating fund to make up the shortfall.

The parks' capital fund has about $4 million in county-option income tax revenue, Westermeier said. However, an agreement between the city and township stipulates that the money be used only to purchase land for parks and construction work on parks. The resolution would allow for an exception to the rule with a transfer.

The township board of trustees also would have to approve the transfer. A special meeting will be called to consider the resolution, but no date has been set.

"The Monon is beautiful," City Councilwoman Luci Snyder said before Monday's vote. "We want it to be successful and be a part of this community. We just want to make sure no one is squandering money."

Councilman Ron Carter said it was unrealistic to expect the Monon Center to earn 100 percent of its cost in the first year.

"It's rare that a business, especially one this large, can break even or turn profit in the first year," he said.

Mayor Jim Brainard was to ask the City Council on Monday to approve $28.5 million to keep construction rolling on the Keystone Avenue roundabout project. In October, the Carmel Redevelopment Commission approved Brainard's request for up to $45 million to finish the Performing Arts Center project.

As part of the Monon Center resolution, the council wants accountability from the Park Board, said Snyder, who co-sponsored the resolution in her role as head of the council's finance committee.

The Parks Board will be obligated to provide a detailed written report on a quarterly basis on the Monon Center's operations, financial plan and current fiscal status to the council, township board and mayor, Snyder said.

"We need to minimize the need to repeat this unfortunate necessity," she said.

If any of the $650,000 is left over Dec. 31, it must be returned to the capital fund, Snyder said.

Westermeier said the need for a subsidy should be expected again in 2009, as it was always part of the plan. The center is paying for 85 percent of its expenses through memberships and other revenue sources, and is expected to be self-sufficient after three years, he said.

The use of capital project funds will not affect future park projects, Westermeier said.

"In our capital plan, for the next five years, I don't see any project not occurring because of that or being cut back," he said.
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Old December 12th, 2008, 10:26 PM   #250
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Final EIS for US 31 released.

http://www.us31hamiltoncounty.in.gov/feis.html

Only two roundabout interchanges after all that study.
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Old December 15th, 2008, 06:04 PM   #251
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arenn View Post
Final EIS for US 31 released.

http://www.us31hamiltoncounty.in.gov/feis.html

Only two roundabout interchanges after all that study.
There are a few things wrong with this project. First is the new alignment. That is completely unnecessary given that it will replace an existing four lane divided highway with sufficient ROW.

Second, the interchange with SR 32 takes up FAR too much space and will require demolition of buildings. Why a compact SPUI wouldn't work there is beyond me. It would save plenty of money in land acquisition costs.
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Old December 21st, 2008, 09:46 PM   #252
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Brainard's state of the city speech for this year is now online:

mms://sms7.omniproductions.net/carmel1/StateOfTheCity2008.wmv

This is a must-listen event. The beginning is a tad dull, but once he gets going he really effectively makes the case for what we need to be doing as a region, not just as one small but affluent part of it.

By the way, one of the ideas he wants to implement is to bury all the power lines in Carmel. That's right, all of them. This is still a ways out though.
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Old December 24th, 2008, 07:09 PM   #253
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http://www.carmel.in.gov/government/.../12-20-08b.htm

Martin Marietta Settlement

Carmel, IN--At Monday's City Council meeting, the Carmel City Council passed a resolution supporting the Board of Zoning Appeals (BZA) settlement with Martin Marietta Materials, Inc.

This settlement puts a long-range plan in place that resolves a series of zoning issues involving operations at various Martin Marietta properties along Hazel Dell Parkway near 106th Street. The settlement, in part, provides for the protection of Carmel residents from adverse impacts that may result from future mining expansion, while at the same time permitting Martin Marietta to continue to provide construction materials for Carmel and the surrounding area. In addition, under the settlement, about 100 acres at the northwest corner of Hazel Dell Parkway and 106th Street will be donated to the city when the sand and gravel extraction is completed for a lake and green space. The lake that will be created will protect, preserve and recharge the underground aquifer from which Carmel gets its water.

“We are pleased that we were able to achieve a settlement between the City and Martin Marietta that will protect the property values of Kingswood and other nearby neighborhoods while ensuring the continued business operations of a valued member of our business community,” said Mayor Jim Brainard.
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Old January 2nd, 2009, 04:17 PM   #254
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City seeks a stimulus of $120 million

Share of proposal would aid existing and new road work


By Robert Annis
robert.annis@indystar.com

The economic stimulus package that the Obama administration is proposing could fund numerous road improvements and create 3,500 jobs in public-works projects in Carmel.

The federal government has asked local governments for shovel-ready projects that could benefit from money from Washington. Carmel requested the most aid of all municipalities in the county, asking for $120 million for several new projects as well as financial help for existing projects, including $44 million for the Keystone Avenue upgrade.

Collectively, Hamilton County entities hope to snag more than a quarter-billion dollars through the massive infrastructure improvement plan the next administration is putting in place to stimulate the sluggish economy.

Current estimates call for $675 to $850 billion to be spent nationwide on infrastructure projects this year and next, although no one seems to know the exact details of the plan.

Hamilton County, Carmel, Westfield and CIRTA, the entity behind a proposed mass transit system connecting Noblesville with downtown Indianapolis, have made more than $250 million in requests.

Noblesville, Fishers and the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization didn't respond to requests for information Tuesday, and Indiana Department of Transportation spokesman Bruce Childs declined to say what projects would be considered.

The federal government typically pays about 80 percent of approved project costs, but Ehren Bingaman, executive director of Central Indiana Regional Transportation Authority, believed that because the package is designed to stimulate the economy, federal officials may be willing to pay all of the costs for projects.

If all of the projects were to be chosen -- a highly unlikely event -- it could save Hamilton County taxpayers around $50 million.

Hamilton County Highway Engineer Jim Neal said the metropolitan planning organization was given little guidance about the process for requesting funds, so it was unable to give his department much direction on the types of projects to submit.

"We haven't been given a lot of guidance as to what strings are attached and if we're going to have to go through the normal federal aid process," Neal said.

"We just picked projects that we thought could be shovel-ready in 180 days. Some of them would have to go through some pretty quick engineering, but it wouldn't be insurmountable."

The county suggested about $30 million in projects, including the next two Riverwalk Trail phases, several bridges and small structures, as well as the planned road resurfacing for 2009.

The regional transportation authority requested nearly $100 million for light-rail projects, including $21 million for four stations, $26 million for 22 miles of new track and $41.5 million for three new trains.

Even if CIRTA received all of its requested funding, Bingaman said it would still be late 2012 before the light-rail system would be operating.

If funding is approved for the Carmel projects, city officials estimate nearly 3,500 jobs will be created.

The infrastructure stimulus package likely will boost employment and spending throughout the county, according to Neal.

"There are still some major projects still going on in the area, although from talking to contractors this winter, not many have jobs on the books to start the spring," Neal said. "It could be a definite boost, because a lot of the non-road building work they've done -- the commercial work, like parking lots -- has slowed down quite a bit. They're all looking for work."

Carmel projects

Public safety

Mobile video system, $400,000; jobs created: 3.

Citywide video system, $2 million; jobs created: 25.

Streets/Roads

Southwest Clay Township miscellaneous drainage improvements (joint project with Hamilton County), $900,000; jobs created: 27.

Southwest Clay Township multiuse path project -- Phase II, $950,000; jobs created: 28.

Guilford Road -- City Center Drive to 131st Street improvement: turning lane, storm sewers, curbs, $1,250,000; jobs created: 38.

River Road realignment from Medalist Parkway to 124th and River Road, $1.8 million; jobs created: 54.

106th Street and Ditch Road roundabout (joint project with Hamilton County), $2 million; jobs created: 60.

Southwest Clay Township multiuse path project -- Phase I, $2 million; jobs created: 60.

Hazel Dell Road miscellaneous improvements between 116th and 146th streets, $2.6 million; jobs created: 78.

Third Avenue Southwest improvements from City Center Drive to Second Street Southwest, $3 million; jobs created: 90.

126th Street from Shelborne Road to Towne Road, $3.6 million; jobs created: 108,

96th and Towne Road roundabout (joint project with Hamilton County), $4.5 million; jobs created: 135.

Shelborne Road from north of 116th Street to 126th Street, $6.5 million; jobs created: 195.

Keystone Avenue and 136th Street, $19.4 million; jobs created: 582.

Keystone and 131st Street interchange construction, $24.6 million; jobs created: 738.

Carmel Heights projects, $40.5 million; jobs created: 1,215.

Water project

Wind turbine project, $4 million; jobs created: 25.

Total

$120 million 3,461 jobs created.
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Old January 4th, 2009, 10:28 PM   #255
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arenn View Post
Brainard's state of the city speech for this year is now online:

mms://sms7.omniproductions.net/carmel1/StateOfTheCity2008.wmv

This is a must-listen event. The beginning is a tad dull, but once he gets going he really effectively makes the case for what we need to be doing as a region, not just as one small but affluent part of it.

By the way, one of the ideas he wants to implement is to bury all the power lines in Carmel. That's right, all of them. This is still a ways out though.
Arenn,

Thanks for posting this weblink. Mayor Brainard definitely gets it. It was interesting to watch how he was able to present his ideas of what constitutes a livable city and offer practical and reasoned examples of how those ideas have been or can be realized in Carmel. He seems to be very effective at communicating the need for change and big ideas without appearing far-fetched or illogical.

Hopefully, Mayor Brainard has career aspirations to become Mayor of Indianapolis some day.
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Old January 5th, 2009, 02:33 AM   #256
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k2h View Post
Hopefully, Mayor Brainard has career aspirations to become Mayor of Indianapolis some day.
We can only pray.
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Old February 5th, 2009, 06:06 PM   #257
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http://www.indystar.com/article/2009...0101/902050457

Beast of a roadside prank merely attack of a hacker
By Melanie D. Hayes
Posted: February 5, 2009

CARMEL, Ind. -- Rush-hour traffic, construction cones, restricted lanes, lowered speed limits and higher speeding fines are stressful enough for drivers along Keystone Avenue.

But level-headed motorists remained calm for three days as "RAPTORS AHEAD CAUTION" blinked from a portable electronic sign in the southbound lanes north of 116th Street.

At least it wasn't a warning of a zombie attack, as with signs displayed in recent days in Austin, Texas, and a St. Louis suburb.

"They are so clever," city spokeswoman Nancy Heck said about the creativity of the warnings. "They are so outrageous."

A warning about extinct velociraptors was a better prank than putting up a message to send motorists the wrong way amid construction to add roundabouts to Keystone, Heck said.

Despite the giggles, transportation officials nationally have expressed concern about online instructions for the signs. An automobile blogger at jalopnik.com on Jan. 28 posted "How to Hack an Electronic Road Sign." Posted a week earlier on i-hacked.com was "Inside programmable road signs," with photos showing how to change the messages.

Carmel's sign normally rotates the messages "106TH CLOSED AHEAD," "PROCEED WITH CAUTION" and "SPEED LIMIT 40 MPH," said Keystone project manager Jeremy Kashman.

"I did not hear of accidents happening from rubber-necking or gawking (at the sign)," Heck said.

Neither, she said, were there any raptor attacks.
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Old February 5th, 2009, 06:08 PM   #258
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I missed this one: http://www.ci.carmel.in.us/governmen...e/01-16-09.htm

News Release

Date: January.16, 2009
Contact: Nancy Heck (317) 571-2494
Release: Immediate

Construction to begin on 136th & Keystone Interchange

Carmel, IN – Construction will begin Monday, January 19th at 136th Street and Keystone Avenue with the clearing of right of way. Utility relocations are expected to begin shortly thereafter. Large scale construction activities are expected to begin in the spring with work continuing through the summer.

The Carmel Board of Public Works (BPW) signed the construction contract for the renovation of the 136th Street and Keystone Avenue intersection with Walsh Construction Company at the BPW meeting on Wednesday, December 17, 2008. Walsh Construction Company was the low bidder for the interchange at approximately $14.3 million. This bid amount was 6% below the engineer's estimate.

This interchange is being funded from the second installment of $20 million from the State of Indiana as part of the agreement to transfer jurisdiction for Keystone to the City. Mayor Jim Brainard worked diligently to accelerate the February 2009 payment from the State so that City received the $20 million payment on December 17, 2008. Under State of Indiana law, the City must have deposited the funds necessary for a contract prior to signing it.

The bids were fully reviewed by Carmel’s Engineering Department and by American Structurepoint, the project’s design engineer. The current contract allows for the likely closure of Keystone for a period of 45 days. This will save the City approximately $640,000 and allow the interchange to open before the beginning of the 2009 school year. Substantial completion of the 136th Street interchange is anticipated for August 1, 2009.

It is important to the overall schedule for Keystone that construction continue in a timely manner to avoid further delays and any further price increases that could only hinder the project funding. Moving forward with the 136th Street interchange at the present time allows the contractor to accomplish work that is vital to the timely relocation of utilities.

The 136th Street interchange is part of the second phase of a three-year project to lower the grade of Keystone Avenue under six major interchanges along the five-mile stretch. When completed, the north-south traffic on Keystone Avenue will be free-flowing with no traffic lights between 96th Street and 146th Street, and tear-drop shaped roundabouts will manage the east-west traffic flow.
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Old February 6th, 2009, 08:08 PM   #259
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http://www.indystar.com/article/2009...1150/LOCAL0101

CNN takes pulse of Carmel's economy
By Melanie D. Hayes
Posted: February 6, 2009

CARMEL -- John King, CNN's chief national correspondent, wants to know what people are talking about in the country, and he chose to focus on Carmel this time around.

This Sunday's "State of the Union with John King" will showcase Carmel and include interviews with Mayor Jim Brainard, local business owners and community members about the economic stimulus debate taking place in the capital.

The weekly news program "offers a blend of newsmaker interviews, political analysis, national and world affairs, cultural segments, media analysis and commentary," according to information sent by CNN.

King and his camera crew spent Thursday touring Carmel and returned home this morning after completing more interviews.

"One of the things we're trying to do every week is tell the debate from outside the Washington perspective," King said. "My personal philosophy with this new show is to get out and listen to the people because we often speak a different language in Washington."

As King travels to each city he seeks out local ideas on what jobs need to be created and what different communities need money for, including new roads, schools, sewage facilities and more.

"This (Carmel) was a good place because it's in the middle of the country and you have a Republican mayor in a state that normally votes Republican for president, but now voted for Obama this time," King said. "It's an interesting perspective.

"Carmel is doing pretty well," he said. "Unemployment is going up but not as much as state or country, but every community is feeling the pinch."

The program will air from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday on CNN.
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Old February 7th, 2009, 04:34 AM   #260
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Great job CNN, go to one of the wealthiest counties in the country to assess the economic climate.

Oh, and King, Hamilton County went for McCain by over 20 points. How about visiting St. Joseph's or Vigo Counties instead?

CNN and King are ******* morons.
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