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Old September 16th, 2009, 03:28 PM   #21
tq
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cost of routes.

Hā Nội – Vinh (7,2 bill USD),
Hā Nội - Thanh Hóa (3,9 bill USD),
HCMC - Nha Trang (9 bill USD),
HCMC - Phan Thiết (3,7 bill USD),
Đā Nẵng - Huế (2,2 bill USD)
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Old January 27th, 2010, 07:42 PM   #22
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I hear about Malaysia Karla Lumpur Singapore High-speed Railway plan, when it link via Thailand and Cambodia, maybe a decade later we get there by train not airplane.
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Old January 27th, 2010, 10:01 PM   #23
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10 hours between Hanoi and Ho Chi Min is still a long time. How fast will the train travel?
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Old January 28th, 2010, 07:58 AM   #24
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Hopefully if they'll adopt a high-speed train, it can hook up to China's CRH network one day.
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Old March 18th, 2010, 11:58 PM   #25
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Sorry to bring this post back, but I read in a couple of places that mentioned the Japanese recommended using the Fastech 360 on this high speed rail line. Can anyone confirm if it's true?
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Old March 21st, 2010, 10:11 AM   #26
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I couldn't find any information regarding rolling stock, but here's a recent article I found regarding the project. I think the rolling stock issue isn't of much concern at the moment, besides it being Japanese; this line's completion date is so far in the future (if it happen's at all) that it's not important now. Also note the the price is increasing...

http://english.vovnews.vn/Home/Hanoi...103/113531.vov

Quote:
Hanoi-Ho Chi Minh City high-speed railway project finalised

The Vietnam – Japan Consultancy Joint Venture (VJC) has completed a report on investment cost for construction of a Hanoi-Ho Chi Minh City high-speed railway.

Using Japanese Shinkansen technology, the 1,570km-long express route will allow trains to travel at 300km per hour. It will have a total of 27 stations, starting at Hanoi and ending at Hoa Hung. The total time from Hanoi to Ho Chi Minh City will be about five and half hours.

The project is estimated to cost up to US$55.8 billion, including US$31 billion for building infrastructure and the remainder for equipment and land clearance.

The project will be divided into four phases. According to plan, the Hanoi-Vinh and Ho Chi Minh City-Nha Trang sections will be put into operation in 2020, Vinh –Da Nang section in 2030 and Da Nang-Nha Trang section in 2035.

The VJC consists of Vietnam’s Transport Investment and Construction Consultant Joint Stock Company (TRICC) and three Japanese partners - the Japan Transportation Consultants (JTC), the Japan Railway Technical Service (JARTS) and the Nippon Koei Co. Ltd.
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Old March 21st, 2010, 02:36 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nouveau.ukiyo View Post
I couldn't find any information regarding rolling stock, but here's a recent article I found regarding the project. I think the rolling stock issue isn't of much concern at the moment, besides it being Japanese; this line's completion date is so far in the future (if it happen's at all) that it's not important now. Also note the the price is increasing...

http://english.vovnews.vn/Home/Hanoi...103/113531.vov
When shall China complete their HSR to Hanoi?
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Old March 23rd, 2010, 07:11 PM   #28
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Vietnam to build north-south express railway

Vietnam is planning to build a north-south express railway, the country's biggest transportation project ever, according to the Vietnam-Japan Consulting Joint Venture (VJC) here on Monday.

This project is part of the country's railway transport development strategy by 2020 with a vision to 2050, approved by Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung last November.

The railway will start from Hanoi to Ho Chi Minh City. The Hanoi-Ho Chi Minh City express railway will be 1,570km long, with 27 stations. The trains' top speed will be 300 kilometers an hour.

The four-phase project is estimated to need an investment of over 55.8 billion U.S. dollars. The money will be sourced from the state budget, the Vietnam Railway Corporation and other investors.

According to VJC, some priority sections of the railway like the Hanoi-central Nghe An province and Ho Chi Minh City- central Khanh Hoa province can open in 2020. The entire route is expected to become operational by 2036.

When the railway is put into operation, it will take five hours and a half to travel from Vietnam's capital city Hanoi to Ho Chi Minh City, said VJC.

Source: Xinhua
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Old March 23rd, 2010, 07:13 PM   #29
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Vietnam Railway To Install Standard Toilets

Vietnam Railway Corporation has planned to install standard toilets on its express trains by 2015 and on all of its trains by 2020, according to Vietnam news agency.

Furthermore, the corporation plans to invest about VND200 million (US$10,500) in each carriage to install the toilets equipped with advanced technology that will be able to properly dispose of waste.

Currently, 100 carriages have standard toilets.

-- BERNAMA
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Old March 24th, 2010, 06:21 PM   #30
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Vietnam is rocking it!
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Old March 24th, 2010, 08:39 PM   #31
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I'm kind of srprised that they haven't started construction yet, I swear I saw photos somewhere of elevated segments being constructed. On a side note, another thing that suprises me is the time period that will be required to construct the HSR (it seems so long, maybe it's the surge of reports on the CRH )

Last edited by Nozumi 300; March 24th, 2010 at 08:48 PM.
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Old April 15th, 2010, 03:12 PM   #32
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Yes it is of course!
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Old May 18th, 2010, 05:56 PM   #33
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Distance between Hanoi and HCM City is more than 1100km.
This is a very distance in every sense, and is a distance viable to be covered by air.
Is the HSR can be made available in a near future (rather than decades from now) and affordable to the masses, then go for it. But, this is not realistic. If at all, HSR even if available may only be affordable to a small section of the population.
What Vietnam need is modern railway that will serve not just the two citys, but all the towns and cities from North to South.
An alternative strategy: double track, electrify and modernise its metre gauge railway. As mentioned in another thread, this can reach 160km/h.
Such infrastructure can be shared with freight, making it even more economically viable.
Vietnam can be join hands with its neighbours like Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia to earnestly develop and modernise the metre gauge railway network to benefit all these countries.
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Old May 18th, 2010, 08:47 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homunwai View Post
Distance between Hanoi and HCM City is more than 1100km.
This is a very distance in every sense, and is a distance viable to be covered by air.
Is the HSR can be made available in a near future (rather than decades from now) and affordable to the masses, then go for it. But, this is not realistic. If at all, HSR even if available may only be affordable to a small section of the population.
What Vietnam need is modern railway that will serve not just the two citys, but all the towns and cities from North to South.
An alternative strategy: double track, electrify and modernise its metre gauge railway. As mentioned in another thread, this can reach 160km/h.
Such infrastructure can be shared with freight, making it even more economically viable.
Japan did both. The 1067 mm railways of Japan are modernised, double-tracked and electrified. And quite fast - 130 km/h is common, and they are dabbling with 160 km/h. But Japan also has incompatible wide gauge Shinkansen lines. The Tokaido main line and other narrow gauge lines duplicated by Shinkansen still exist and are very busy.

Vietnam has what, two thirds the population of Japan. Why should Vietnam not deserve having both upgraded narrow gauge rail network and HSR, like Japan?

Also, Hanoi to Saigon is over 1700 km. But Lanzhou to Urumqi is also over 1700 km. This is desert. Much fewer people than in Vietnam. Nevertheless Lanxin HSR is affordable and competitive with air. If a railway from Beijing through Xian and Lanzhou to Urumqi makes sense, surely so does a railway from Guangzhou through Nanning and Hanoi to Saigon?
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Originally Posted by homunwai View Post
Vietnam can be join hands with its neighbours like Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia to earnestly develop and modernise the metre gauge railway network to benefit all these countries.
Agreed. Remember Vietnamīs neighbour Yunnan too, and the metre gauge railway to Kunming. As well as Bangladesh, India and Pakistan.
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Old May 19th, 2010, 03:35 AM   #35
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Hopefully a policy of building a dedicated high speed passenger route and upgrading of the metre gauge route for freight and local (affordable for the average worker) passenger trains will be implemented, much like in China.
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Old May 26th, 2010, 01:32 AM   #36
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Express railway project: The “Great Wall” for Vietnam?

source: VietNamNews

Quote:
VietNamNet Bridge – Many National Assembly’s deputies felt insecure about the North-South railway project cost, estimated at $56 billion. Deputy Tran Ba Thieu, Director of Hai Phong Police Agency, disagreed: “If the Government is determined, why doesn’t the NA support them? If Qin Shi Huangdi had not been drastic, how could China have its Great Wall today?”


NA Committee for Culture-Education, Youth and Children Vice-Chair Nguyen Minh Thuyet compared this project with a poor couple who must struggle to take care of their children, but when they see their neighbors buy a car, they also borrow money to buy one too.

Vietnam’s GDP 2009 was $90 billion. The capital for this project is $56 billion and may climb higher in the next 30 years, along with inflation, observed NA Legal Committee Chair Nguyen Van Thuan on May 21.

He wondered about the source of capital. “The government’s debt is up to 42 percent. If this project is carried out, where will the money come from? Haven’t we learned a lesson from Greece, which is in crisis because of public debts and needs assistance from all of Europe? We can’t approve this project to let our children bear this debt,” Thuan argued.

Thuan cited some projects that looked very good on paper, such as the Ho Chi Minh highway. When this highway was opened for traffic, it didn’t attract vehicles.

“The (railway) project is quite lavish. I will not approve it. We will reconsider it in the next 10-20 years. If I approve it now, I will feel like I am making a mistake for future generations,” he added.

NA Committee for Culture-Education, Youth and Children Vice-Chair Nguyen Minh Thuyet compared this project with a poor couple who must struggle to take care of their children, but when they see their neighbors buy a car, they also borrow money to buy one too.

Thuyet is also concerned about the huge capital needed for this project when Vietnam must invest in other big projects, including nuclear power plants in Ninh Thuan province. The Vice-Chair questioned why only 11 countries in the world have built express railways.

Thuyet raised several questions: “We hope that with this express railway, we can have breakfast in HCM City, lunch in Da Nang and dinner in Hanoi. HCM City’s residents can work in Hanoi and return home within the day. But who can afford train fare that is equivalent to 50-70 percent of air fares? Without passengers, how can we retrieve capital?”

Supporting these views, Deputy Le Van Tam (Can Tho) asserted that the express railway is a “luxurious” project, Deputy Ngo Van Minh (Quang Nam) characterized it as “too romantic” while Deputy Phuong Huu Viet (Bac Giang) called it “sudden inspiration.” Deputies Ha Thanh Toan (Can Tho) and Ngo Van Minh (Quang Nam) questioned why a rich country like the US has no transnational express highway, while a poor country like Vietnam wants to pursue such a huge project?

“Vietnam is a poor country where most people live in rural areas where life and traffic is very difficult. Building an express railway is lavish and unfair,” concluded Deputy Le Van Tam.

Many deputies cited the case of Noi Bai International Airport in Hanoi, calling it untidy with plastic buckets used to catch rain water and citing how it sometimes takes over two hours to go from downtown to the airport. They concurred that the current railway is both outdated and unsafe, so the Government should not “draw” new projects.

NA Committee for Foreign Relations Chair Nguyen Van Son claimed that this is a “magnificent” project for the next 50-70 years.

Some deputies suggested building the HCM City-Nha Trang or Hanoi-Vinh segment on a trial basis as a learning experience.

Deputy Nguyen Ba Thanh, Party Secretary of Da Nang, is not worried about the capital, because Vietnam can borrow money and pay. Instead he is concerned about the way this project is to be implemented. “We plan to build 1570km, but only 364km will run on land, the remaining will be bridges and tunnels when geological conditions are complicated. If an incident happens, it will be very difficult to resolve,” Thanh warned.

“I only hope that the express railway can reach 200km/hour. We should not be too romantic in building a railway for 300km/h or to build the longest express railway in the world,” he added.

Deputy Nguyen Tan Trinh revealed his unease about safety issues, citing how children still throw bricks and stones at passing trains. “We can’t deal with people’s awareness of railway safety, so how can we ensure safety for express trains?” Trinh cautioned.

Many deputies also questioned the Japanese EMU technology, which may become outdated in the next 25 years.

“This project will also make affect the natural flow of rivers, especially in the central region, causing changes to the environment,” remarked Deputy Vu Thi Phuong Anh (Quang Nam).

Most deputies proposed not approving the plan right now because it is not very necessary.

“We should upgrade and perfect current road and railway systems. To serve cargo transportation, it is better to invest in waterway networks,” suggested Deputy Ha Thanh Toan.

Deputy Phung Thanh Kiem (Lang Son) noted: “The National Assembly still complains about the Government’s inaccurate forecast for 5-10 year strategies, while we sit here talking about a traffic project for the next 23 years. Is it practical?”

Deputy Tran Du Lich (HCM City) proposed that technology, economics and life will change greatly in the next 20 years. “What mean of transport will be the major one in the next 15-20 years? It should not be cars because this is a personal vehicle. Waterways? We have developed them, but we should consider further expansion. Trains will be the major vehicles and we should have invested in railways a long time ago,” Lich analyzed.

He went on to say that if Vietnam chooses normal trains that can run at the speed of 200km/h, when the country need express trains it will be unable to upgrade. “In the early 1990s, our telecommunications system was a zero. At that time, we discussed what to choose, analog or digital. Luckily, we selected digital technology and that was a sound strategy. What would have happened if we had chosen analog?” Lich questioned.

Based on these points, Lich argued that the express railway project is suitable for Vietnam, but wondered about difficulties in choosing contractors.

“It would be a problem if we compare $56 billion with GDP. But if we share it for 20 years, then the figure is not too high,” Lich estimated.

Deputy Pham Thi Loan (Hanoi) pointed out that Taiwan planned to build express railway system at a cost of $27 billion, but the real cost was only $16 billion and it needed only 20 years to retrieve capital. Loan suggested allowing the public and foreign investors to take part in this project to quickly retrieve capital.

Minister of Planning and Investment Vo Hong Phuc reasoned that this project must be considered based on Vietnam’s development, not current conditions. Japan built its express railway after the Second World War and paid its debt to the World Bank after 40 years.

Deputies from the provinces where the express railway will pass through praised the railways in the US and some European countries they witnessed with their own eyes.

Minister of Transportation Ho Nghia Dung provided more information on the project. He explained that the current railway system in Vietnam was built 120 years ago and it was a great work at that time. “The current development of the economy poses the need for investment in railways, he proposed.

About the biggest concern, that of capital, Dung explained that Vietnam may have to mobilize capital from various sources, but the capital structure for this project is not defined yet.

As for safety, Dung responded that two-thirds of the rail line will run through viaducts, far from residential areas, and that there will be fences for other segments.

The Minister averred that Vietnam should build this system, giving priority to the HCM City-Nha Trang and Hanoi-Vinh sections. “After these segments are built, we will consider the actual situation to make decisions about the construction of remaining segments,” he stated.

The NA will continue its discussion about the express railway project on June 8.


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Old May 26th, 2010, 01:35 AM   #37
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Two ministers defend express rail project

source: VietNamNet

Quote:
VietNamNet Bridge – Admitting that the North-South express railway project is an extremely large project that costs half of Vietnam’s annual GDP, both the Ministers of Transportation and Finance focused on praising its “social effects.”



Minister of Transportation Ho Nghia Dung surrounded by reporters on the sideline of the 7th NA session.

Transportation Minister Ho Nghia Dung, Finance Minister Vu Van Ninh and the National Assembly’s Committee for Finance-Budget Chair Phung Quoc Hien on May 20 spoke with the press about this project on the sidelines of the 7th NA session.

Is Vietnam capable of building the North-South express railway at this time?

Minister of Transportation Ho Nghia Dung
: The current railway system doesn’t meet present needs, putting pressure on the road system and urging the development of personal transport, resulting in traffic jams and accidents.

Our mission is to construct a railway system to transport huge volumes of goods and large numbers of passengers to share the load with other forms of transportation along the North-South route.

The Government proposed upgrading the current railway to ensure train speeds of 80km/hour for cargo transportation and 120km/hour for passenger transportation, while building a high-speed rail route with speeds up to 350km/hour.

We will apply the most modern technology in the world to build this railway.

This (express railway) is the chance to re-arrange the country’s transportation structure and to connect the two economic centres in the fastest way to form the North-South urban aegis.

This route will help travelers save time and money, reduce the pressure on the road system, curb gridlocks and connect to highway, aviation and waterway transportation.

This project will surely help reduce fatal traffic accidents, promote economic exchange among the regions and ensure security and defence.

NA’s Finance-Budget Committee Chair Phung Quoc Hien: This is a visionary project. When the railway is put into use in 2030, the income of our people may reach $3000/person/year, not $1000. So we must set train fares based on income at that time. Anyway, the train fare will cheaper than air fares.

Some countries enlarge their gauges to raise their transportation capability, why don’t we choose this?

Minister Dung: Among four options proposed by the Government, there were plans to expand the gauge. But let’s image that if we enlarge the current 1m rail to 1.435m, the current North-South railway will have to shut down. Site clearance is also very costly.

What do you think about the feasibility of this project?

Minister Dung: The investment report analyses the economic-social and economic-financial effectiveness of this project already. I may say that its economic effectiveness may not be high, but in the broader view, investment capital can be refunded.

As the Government’s debt is rising, should we continue to borrow capital to implement this project in 2012?

Minister Dung: This is just an investment report submitted to the NA for consideration of whether or not it is feasible.

If the NA decides to implement it, we will have to consult with partners about loans and loan conditions plus other things.

This is an extremely big project, which accounts for 50 percent of annual GDP and will be implemented until 2025, with over $2 billion of capital/year in the first ten years. Investment in transportation currently accounts for only 7 percent of total social investment, while it should be 15 percent. With this project, the total investment for transportation will reach 15 percent, still an acceptable level.

Finance Minister Vu Van Ninh: Borrowing capital for this project is necessary because our infrastructure is very poor, which hinders the country’s development.

Our reserves are still small while we must solve two missions simultaneously: investment for development and ensuring social welfare. Our source of capital for investment is not abundant, so we must borrow money.

The economic impact of this project is not very high, but in the long run and in social terms, it is good.

Hien: We have to accept the fact that we can’t recover the investment capital immediately from all projects. Initially, we must use capital from the state budget to build infrastructure. Certainly, we must ensure national financial security as the top priority.

This is a long-term project. In its report, the Government explained that capital will be mobilized from various economic sectors. In the first phase, budget funds will be used reasonably to attract capital for this project.

This project will be carried in 25 years and during that long period, many things will change. Experts have estimated that the capital may reach $100 billion, not $56 billion. What do you think?

Hien: Calculations are quite accurate because they are based on highly technical parameters. The capital may rise by 13 percent. The risk is not high and we may need more money to pay for site clearance and resettlement.

According to the NA’s Committee for Finance-Budget, Vietnam must borrow capital for the infrastructure project. Is the government’s debt at a worrisome level?

Finance Minister Ninh: Vietnam doesn’t have any overdue debt and this is the healthiness of our finance.

Like a family building their house, if they don’t have enough money, they must borrow capital and then save to pay the debt. It is very normal.

The safety level is set by the Government at 50 percent of GDP. Depending on economic potential, some countries may set higher levels. It is important to pay debts. If the debt is small, but you can’t pay it, then you will still go bankrupt.


Le Nhung
Quote:
Former Minister of Transportation Dao Dinh Binh said that Vietnam needs a North-South express railway but it should not build this route right now.

Binh said Vietnam should develop the express highway instead of express railway because there will have not enough passengers and Vietnam’s economic potential is not strong enough.

Many experts had the same idea with Binh, saying that the investor’s forecast of passenger volume is too optimistic. They also worried about the source of capital for this huge project.
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Old May 26th, 2010, 01:37 AM   #38
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Experts fear North-South express railway cost could reach $100 billion

source; VietNamNet

Quote:
VietNamNet Bridge – Vietnam’s technical elite discussed the feasibility and financial projections of the mammoth North-South high-speed railway project at a seminar in Hanoi on May 11.


The express railway (black line) will run from Hanoi to HCM City.

In principle, everyone’s for the project, reports Tuoi Tre. All twelve members of a panel convened by VUSTA (the Union of Scientific and Technological Associations) expect the project to be implemented soon. However, panelists expressed concerns about the feasibility of the plan, site clearance tasks and especially the apparently ever-rising cost of the project, now pegged at $55.8 billion.

Dr. Khuat Viet Hung, vice director of the Institute for Transportation Planning and Development, said that the project meets a critical need for passenger transportation between north and south and it will stimulate urban development along the route. However, Hung added, the investment report submitted to the National Assembly for its consideration has shortcomings. It doesn’t specify the technology needed or address risks to the national economy. He recalled that “Thailand launched a project of express railways and highways but it had to cancel this work in the late 1990s during the so-called Asian financial crisis.”

Pham Sy Liem, head of the Institute for Urban Research and Infrastructure Development and concurrently vice chairman of the Construction Federation, believes that the investment report was compiled and assessed too quickly, considering the scale of the project. “We must be sure that the plan is studied dispassionately, and make sure that various ‘pressures’ don’t push us into a swamp.”

Dr. Nguyen Quang A said: “At first hearing, the project sounds very good. I’d love to see it implemented immediately. However, do we have the strength to carry it out, at the same time that we are taking on a lot of other big projects?” Dr. A noted that a critical assumption in the plan for the 1600 kilometer, six hour high speed rail link between Hanoi and HCM City is annual GNP growth averaging 6.4 percent for the next twenty-five years.

By 2035, A calculated, Vietnam’s annual GDP may reach $500-600 billion. At the same time, the total capital requirement for the express rail link could inflate by another 30 percent to around $100 billion, accounting for 16 to 18 percent of GDP, rather than the $55.8 billion currently forecast.

“We will have to borrow capital to build it. Suppose we get into the sort of trouble facing Greece? Greece has been saved by the rest of Europe. Who will save us?” A asked.

Prof. Nguyen Xuan Truc of the Road and Bridge Science Association expressed concern whether projections of demand for seats on the North-South express trains are accurate. “In foreign countries,” Truc said, “the majority of passengers on express trains are workers who travel from their home to distant offices. In Vietnam, will people in Nghe An use the express train to go to Hanoi to work?”

Truc added that he backed the project, “but still I wonder about the cost-benefit analysis. The state believes in us and makes decisions based on our data so we are partly responsible if there’s a wrong decision.”

Dr. Nguyen Dinh Hoe, speaking for the Association for Natural and Environmental Protection, said that the project still lacks a detailed report on environmental impacts. Nearly 1400 hectares of forest will be destroyed for the construction of the express railway, he pointed out. Further, some 214 kilometers of raised roadbed is likely to have major impacts on drainage, especially after storms, similar to the problems that arose in Quang Nam and Quang Ngai provinces when the present railroad and Highway One were built.

“Over 16,000 families will be affected; twice as many must be relocated as in the Son La hydropower project. This is a big problem,” Hoe worried.

Nguyen Huu Bang, general director of the Vietnam Railway Corporation, the principal investor of this huge project, listened carefully. Speaking after the experts, Bang said that the high speed rail project is now only in its first stage, that is, presenting a plan for the National Assembly to consider and make a decision in principle. The report only addresses the necessity of investing in such a project. It does not go deeply into other contents.

Bang said that everything in the report to the Assembly is a projection and concept; it’s a pre-feasiblility report. Vietnam does not have experience in high-speed rail and must learn from other countries. They’ll help with the technical details. Once the project has been approved by the National Assembly, Bang added, the investors will collaborate on a feasibility report, which will analyze data related to the source of capital, debt management, and environmental impacts.


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Old May 26th, 2010, 01:38 AM   #39
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Vietnam's high-speed railway to come with hefty price tag

source: EarthTimes

Quote:
Hanoi - Vietnam's proposal to build a 56-billion-dollar high-speed railway from Hanoi to Ho Chi Minh City may be more than the country can afford, economists and National Assembly deputies said Friday.

The government submitted its plan for the railway, to be built with Japanese technical assistance, to the National Assembly on Thursday.

The railway would stretch 1,570 kilometres and cut the travel time between Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City from at least 36 hours today to under 10 hours.

Foreign development assistance and loans from the World Bank would be needed to finance the project. Critics say the debt would be too large to recoup at realistic ticket prices in a low- to middle-income country like Vietnam.

"We don't have passengers for this railroad," said senior economist Le Dang Doanh, a former adviser to the prime minister who calls for the project to be broken into smaller stages. "If we sell the tickets at a high price, people will choose other means of transport, like buses. The project is not calculated carefully."

Speaking to reporters at the National Assembly on Thursday, transportation minister Ho Nghia Dung admitted the project, which would cost over half of Vietnam's current annual gross domestic product (GDP) of 90 billion dollars, was not efficient in economic terms.

But he did argue for its "social effectiveness" and capacity to boost exchanges between the country's north and south.

Many National Assembly deputies were sceptical of the project. In the assembly's meetings Thursday, Danh Vu Minh, chairman of the assembly's Technology and Environment Committee, noted that with the national debt currently at over 42 per cent of GDP, further indebtedness was risky.

Cao Si Kiem, former governor of the country's State Bank, said the government had not clarified the project's transport benefits or explained how it would raise the needed funds.

Another deputy, former minister of transportation Dao Dinh Binh, said the government should prioritise highways due to the lack of current demand for high-speed rail.

International analysts generally emphasise the poor state of Vietnam's road network, the shortage of rail freight and lack of port capacity as the country's top transportation priorities.

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Old May 26th, 2010, 04:58 AM   #40
foxmulder
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I have to agree that this is just too expensive for Vietnam. I mean, numbers do not lie. If a country has a GDP of 90 billion, it cannot just spend 55 billion on a single railroad project. On the other hand, this type of infrastructure projects are musts for development so the appropriate method is to build this project in small pieces over at least 25-30 years.
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