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Old August 16th, 2016, 11:07 AM   #4201
Mathias Olsen
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Progress E39 motorway Eiganestunnel Stavanger

Eiganestunnel is a city tunnel in Stavanger that connects the Rogfast tunnels to Haugesund with the Ryfast motorway tunnel to Tau and the E39 motorway to Kristiansand.



Construction of the Eiganestunnel is within the Ryfast project.



It is part of the E39 motorway Stavanger-Bergen and Stavanger-Røldal-Oslo.



Eiganestunnel fills the missing link of the Northern E39 Stavanger motorway bypass. The 4-lane tunnel has a T 9,5 profile. With the tunnel, the E39 motorway Stavanger-Haugesund will be extended with 4 km. The predicted AADT is 35 000 in 2035.



Construction started in 2012 and on August 8, 2016, work on the this tunnel is in a final stage. Now some additional work, like technical buildings, ventilators, fiber cable, radar detectors for traffic management and cameras are waiting to be installed. Opening of the tunnel will not be earlier than 2018. Interesting part is an underground motorway interchange with Rv 13 to Tau.
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Old August 16th, 2016, 12:15 PM   #4202
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Automatic Toll Stations in Norway

Paying toll on a motorway is always annoying. It can be worse, when you have to wait in a row to pay at toll plazas, like in e.g. Italy. Norway has introduced automatic toll stations or ‘open road tolling’. All vehicles don’t have to stop, which doesn’t make toll cheaper, but a lot easier. Other countries in Europe, such as Germany and the Netherlands tried in the past to implement such an automatic system for cars less than 3,5 t, but because of problems with governance and technical issues they failed.
Many motorway construction sections are financed by tolls. There is a pre-determined percentage of the total construction costs of toll collection that should be applied. When the payments are done, the motorway will be toll-free. Because of the growth of traffic, this is often years earlier than according to the schedule.



Invoices for cars registered in other countries are issued by Euro Parking Collection (EPC), which uses other countries' car registers to find the name and address of the car owner. The invoice is paid to EPC, an authorised service provider in London with authority to issue invoices to vehicle owners registered outside the jurisdiction of the issuing authority. Instead of waiting for the invoice, you can to pay online within three days after passing:



In Oslo there are flexible toll prices. You are charged every time you drive into Oslo, in 2016 an amount of NOK 32 when your car is below 3,5 t. When you leave Oslo, you don’t have to pay. Oslo's toll plazas are ‘open road tolling’. All vehicles shall drive through without stopping.

AutoPASS tag is a subscription, that makes payments easier. Without AutoPass tag, you pay after passing with the car registration number. It is photographed upon passing and the owner will receive an invoice by post within 3 months.
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Old August 16th, 2016, 03:45 PM   #4203
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The Netherlands tried to implement a different system, basically a mileage tax. Every single kilometer driven would've been taxed, with higher rates during rush hour. It also wasn't a special purpose tax, unlike the Norwegian tolling system which is used to fund roads and transit. The Dutch mileage tax would just be another tax for the government coffers. The proposal was very unpopular among the electorate and it was postponed and later scrapped. Some left-wing parties still want to pursue it.
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Old August 16th, 2016, 07:54 PM   #4204
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Just for fun I was calculating how much a Tesla Model S P90 Ludicrous would cost in taxes if they had to pay the same taxes as fuel cars.

In this case there are two tax types;

* weight tax
* engine power tax

The NOx and CO2 tax do not apply.

(tax rates)

The weight tax would be 203 902 NOK / € 22,050
The engine power tax would be 787 355 NOK / € 85,115

So that's a grand total of nearly 1 million NOK in taxes. Or € 107,105. It would basically double the price of the car.
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Old August 16th, 2016, 08:21 PM   #4205
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathias Olsen View Post




Anyone find it interesting that the destination signed on Road 13 is a village of 300 inhabitants 200km away
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Old August 16th, 2016, 10:09 PM   #4206
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Anyone find it interesting that the destination signed on Road 13 is a village of 300 inhabitants 200km away
Yes, Røldal is a very small village. But a target on a motorway doesn't have to be a city or a village. It is possible it has another meaning: a mountain pass. Such a thing is not uncommon in Europe. Check out that the village Simplon in Switzerland had in 2014 only 327 inhabitants. But it is on motorway A9 on the same sign as metropole Milano with 1.4 million inhabitants, check it out:



Careful investigation on the E39 motorway sign will reveal that you will see a tunnel sign before Røldal

Question: when will the Stavanger Arm to Røldal via Rv 13 be improved? A bridge will be needed to make it a ferry-free road. It will be a cry from Stavanger next decade for sure to shorten the trip to Oslo.
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Last edited by berlinwroclaw; August 16th, 2016 at 10:22 PM.
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Old August 16th, 2016, 11:44 PM   #4207
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Quote:
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(...)

Careful investigation on the E39 motorway sign will reveal that you will see a tunnel sign before Røldal
I think that mark after the road number is a Kr symbol, informing that Ryfast (Rv13) is a toll road.
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Old August 17th, 2016, 08:57 AM   #4208
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Just for fun I was calculating how much a Tesla Model S P90 Ludicrous would cost in taxes if they had to pay the same taxes as fuel cars.

In this case there are two tax types;

* weight tax
* engine power tax

The NOx and CO2 tax do not apply.

(tax rates)

The weight tax would be 203 902 NOK / € 22,050
The engine power tax would be 787 355 NOK / € 85,115

So that's a grand total of nearly 1 million NOK in taxes. Or € 107,105. It would basically double the price of the car.
It's going to happen very soon, electric cars should not be tax exempt. The curent govt are working towards dropping the power tax, that's a stupid tax if ever there was one.
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Old August 17th, 2016, 05:40 PM   #4209
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Originally Posted by berlinwroclaw View Post
Question: when will the Stavanger Arm to Røldal via Rv 13 be improved? A bridge will be needed to make it a ferry-free road. It will be a cry from Stavanger next decade for sure to shorten the trip to Oslo.
Not a good idea to launch Rv 13 to Røldal as a main road from Stavanger to Oslo. It is now already slower than via E39 Haugesund. An upgrade of Rv 13 Tau-Røldal will be again an expensive mission, while Rogaland has already consumed much of the national road budget. Even with a new bridge and several other updates, it will never be snow-free and as safe as the E39 motorway. Rogaland is already on top on road accidents in Norway in 2016.



In 2023 when E39 motorway Stavanger-Haugesund will be available, the road via E39 will be much faster, snow-free ferry-free and especially much safer. Rogaland should focus first on upgrade of E134 Haugesund-Røldal to motorway.
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Old August 17th, 2016, 05:44 PM   #4210
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How realistic is a motorway from Odda to Bergen really? Judging by the terrain, it's either nearly entirely undergrond, or on bridges.

It looks like basically a 70 - 80 kilometer long tunnel that is interrupted only briefly for some bridges to cross fjords or valleys.
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Old August 17th, 2016, 06:18 PM   #4211
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
How realistic is a motorway from Odda to Bergen really? Judging by the terrain, it's either nearly entirely undergrond, or on bridges.

It looks like basically a 70 - 80 kilometer long tunnel that is interrupted only briefly for some bridges to cross fjords or valleys.
There is a proposal of economists, business companies and road consultancy companies for a motorway Bergen-Odda. It showed that this motorway is feasible. In that plan the tunnel length is much less than 70 km and there are several options to go from Bergen to Jondal. You can see on one of the proposals below (the most expensive alternative) 8 tunnels with a total length of 45 km. There are cheaper alternatives with much less tunnels.



But this is Norway, not the Netherlands. There is an interaction with the 43 billion Hordfast project Haugesund-Bergen. There is still no approval for Hordfast. A new motorway has been in the past a long process of political decisions and slow upgrades. See E6 Oslo-Lillehammer and E18 Oslo-Kristiansand. A realistic plan therefore starts with a bridge near Jondal and then gradually upgrades of the existing road Odda-Bergen with more and more 2+1 stretches and finally (after some decades) a motorway. But when the time is ripe and there is enough political momentum it may go faster. See E39 Kristiansand-Stavanger.

Just wait a month. The road corridor Bergen-Oslo will be discussed again in parliament with decision making.
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Last edited by Mathias Olsen; August 17th, 2016 at 06:23 PM.
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Old August 17th, 2016, 07:00 PM   #4212
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathias Olsen View Post
Just wait a month. The road corridor Bergen-Oslo will be discussed again in parliament with decision making.
But will that lead to something new? If I have understood correctly, about every cabinet and parliament has discussed the same thing during the last 50 years. Decisions have been made, but the case is still in the NATO mode: No Action, Talk Only.

As the others have pointed out, the regional decision makers have a lot of power in Norway. Therefore, it seems unrealistic to have a single main corridor between Oslo and Bergen: There are at least three competing candidates each having a strong regional support. My guess is that in 2060, there will be three 2+1 roads between the cities, but only a few fractions of motorway.
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Old August 17th, 2016, 10:42 PM   #4213
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As the others have pointed out, the regional decision makers have a lot of power in Norway. Therefore, it seems unrealistic to have a single main corridor between Oslo and Bergen: There are at least three competing candidates each having a strong regional support. My guess is that in 2060, there will be three 2+1 roads between the cities, but only a few fractions of motorway.
There is much local power indeed. However the Minister of Transport has limited the number of approved main roads from Bergen to Oslo to only 2. First one is the E134, selected in 2015. Second one will be selected after the summer. The choice is between Rv 7 and Rv 52. The non-selected road won’t have priority with snow cleaning in winter and improvements.

Rv 52 has the best arguments to be selected as second main road, because it is lower and longer snow-free and connects more traffic than Rv 7. But Rv 7 has support of many Conservatives, the biggest political party. When Rv 52 will be selected, a Jondal bridge will be to approved, because it is far from E16/Rv 52. When Rv 7 will be selected, we just have to wait for a new government. A new government will have more people of the younger generation and they are more concerned about the economic future of Norway. Good infrastructure between East and West is part of it. Very likely they will select E134 because it adds more to economy.
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Old August 17th, 2016, 10:54 PM   #4214
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Quote:
Originally Posted by berlinwroclaw View Post
There is much local power indeed. However the Minister of Transport has limited the number of approved main roads from Bergen to Oslo to only 2. First one is the E134, selected in 2015. Second one will be selected after the summer. The choice is between Rv 7 and Rv 52. The non-selected road won’t have priority with snow cleaning in winter and improvements.
Hard facts are secondary ones when politicians open their mouth. Minister of transport may decide something, but the future shows how solid that sort of Oslo-based decisions are. I do not believe in any scenario consisting of less than three main corridors, taking the political realities into account.
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Old August 17th, 2016, 11:25 PM   #4215
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I travelled the E6 from Malmö to Oslo on Wednesday, July 27.
I traveled E6 from Helsingborg to Oslo on Tuesday, July 26.

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Originally Posted by Heico-M View Post
The remaining drive from the Norwegian border to Oslo was really slow because of very dense traffic, including a legitimate traffic jam at the Follotunnelen construction site.
There was more traffic in N compared to northern S but I could cruise close to the allowed speed limit.

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It was almost only Norwegian number plates. Are there so many people going to Sweden that it results in such extreme traffic on a weekday?
Yep, I also recognized that there are almost just N number plates from the border but I know this from almost every border in Europe... Dunno why but I think I (and likely many others on this forum) overrate long-distance traffic compared to local traffic especially close to border crossings...
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Which new motorways are currently under construction?
Which new motorways will be opened next?

See 'New motorway projects' thread

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Old August 18th, 2016, 02:37 PM   #4216
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With improved infrastructure the northern part of the Swedish west coast is also a very popular holiday destination among people from the Oslo - area, and holiday homes and cabins for sale in the area have almost exclusively gone to Norwegians during the last couple of decades. Hence, the Norwegian population in this area is significant during summer, and probably extremely important for the local economy.

With the decline of the NOK lately, the price differences between Norway and Sweden are much smaller than they used to be, btw, but Nordby at the Swedish side of the border is called "the largest shopping mall of Norway", and hence is probably an interesting destination for local shopaholics anyway.....
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Old August 18th, 2016, 03:31 PM   #4217
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SEK and NOK are almost the same nowadays. They also built a second shopping center along E18 at Töcksfors, I stopped there to get some last-minute cheap fuel before entering Norway, there weren't many customers.
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Old August 18th, 2016, 07:27 PM   #4218
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This part of Bohuslän has a low population and is also rather remote for most swedes.

.

Swedish average is 21 inhabitants/square kilometer.

Makes you wonder why the E6 was built to motorway standard before the E4 between Stockholm and Malmö...
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Old August 18th, 2016, 10:59 PM   #4219
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SEK and NOK are almost the same nowadays. They also built a second shopping center along E18 at Töcksfors, I stopped there to get some last-minute cheap fuel before entering Norway, there weren't many customers.
I tried something like the same which resulted in the diesel price in Sweden being 1 kr higher than just across the border in Norway
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Old August 18th, 2016, 11:08 PM   #4220
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Diesel is rather expensive in Sweden, Preem lists it at 12,99 SEK (€ 1.37) currently.

Petrol is *much* cheaper (in euro) this year in Norway than on my trip two years ago. I think the difference is approximately € 0.35 per liter compared to 2014. The decline of the NOK also helped that.

I didn't care too much about prices though, I always get the lowest consumption in Norway and Sweden, close to 4 L / 100 km. It helps to drive long distances at 80 or 90 km/h while not passing through many towns, roundabouts or other slowdowns.
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