daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 28th, 2016, 08:37 PM   #4381
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,573
Likes (Received): 19366

They are going to deploy avalanche towers in Norway for the first time. The system consists of a tower that can remotely detonate explosives to induce an avalanche. This controlled release of an avalanche can secure roads in avalanche-prone areas.

The system is not new, it's already deployed in places like Austria, British Columbia and Switzerland. The first Norwegian location will be County Road 53 in Sogn og Fjordane.

__________________

my clinched highways / travel mapping • highway photography @ Flickr and Youtube

Suburbanist liked this post
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old September 29th, 2016, 01:51 AM   #4382
54°26′S 3°24′E
Registered User
 
54°26′S 3°24′E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 811
Likes (Received): 155

Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Why they're building E6 motorway north of Lillehammer? Some time ago there was a post saying that Rv3 is the main road Oslo-Trondheim and a future motorway between the two cities would follow that route.
It is is not a motorway, but this upgrade is needed regardless of any future decision on motorway Trondheim-Oslo. It is true that Rv3 is the dominant route Trondheim-Oslo, but there is no decision on if or where a motorway should be built. The E6 serves a different purpose, for tourists, local traffic and traffic between Oslo and parts of the west coast between Bergen and Trondheim.
[
Quote:
Originally Posted by berlinwroclaw View Post
It suggests that NPRA with silent approval of the government want to upgrade the E6 and not the Rv3. Last update plans of Rv3 are below expectations and seem to limit attraction of Rv3. There is much more focus on upgrading E6. The only missing link for an grade separated E6 expressway Oslo-Trondheim seems to be passing the Dovre plateau. Perhaps E6 is more interesting because it covers a wider and more dense populated area. However, some expensive tunnels may be needed to mitigate the attraction of Rv3.
We are living in a democracy, and there the public agencies are supposed to follow what the politicians says. Except the few seconds of irritation represented by the roundabouts, the improvement is not too bad. Most of it, the part shared between Rv3 and the Elverum-Hamar road, which is the most problematic stretch of Rv 3 today, will be four lanes. The next step will hopefully be 4 lanes all the way south to E6. Remember that Elverum is approximately as close to Trondheim as Lillehammer is. North of Elverum the improvements on Rv3 have been evolutional lately, but no motorway is planned north of Lillehammer either, so in the foreseeable future Rv3 will continue to be the clearly fastest, and hence most popular alternative.

BTW, as we have seen in the case E6 Trondheim-Stjørdal, building a 1+1 road in hilly terrain does not necessarily pave the way for a future motorway as the geometry requirements are more relaxed on 1+1. I expect developing /realigning Rv3 to a motorway will be significantly cheaper than the winding E6.
54°26′S 3°24′E no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2016, 01:55 AM   #4383
54°26′S 3°24′E
Registered User
 
54°26′S 3°24′E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 811
Likes (Received): 155

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
They are going to deploy avalanche towers in Norway for the first time. The system consists of a tower that can remotely detonate explosives to induce an avalanche. This controlled release of an avalanche can secure roads in avalanche-prone areas.

The system is not new, it's already deployed in places like Austria, British Columbia and Switzerland. The first Norwegian location will be County Road 53 in Sogn og Fjordane.

The traditional way in Norway has been to protect the road from the impact of an avalanche rather than releasing the forces in a controlled manner. The former is more expensive, but the latter requires road closures.
54°26′S 3°24′E no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2016, 11:10 AM   #4384
MattiG
Registered User
 
MattiG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Espoo FI
Posts: 1,796
Likes (Received): 614

Quote:
Originally Posted by 54°26′S 3°24′E View Post
I expect developing /realigning Rv3 to a motorway will be significantly cheaper than the winding E6.
I believe that the investments in Norway are not based on point-to-point thinking only, but taking a more holistic view. The one-dimensional roads form a two-dimensional network, and most of the traffic does not flow from an endpoint to another one.

As the map shows, the Rv3 runs through more or less deserted areas. If that route were taken as the main N-S corridor, how would the access to the west coast be arranged? I do not believe there is much sense to create two parallel main motorway-grade corridors Oslo-Trondheim and Oslo-Dombås.
MattiG no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2016, 12:21 PM   #4385
italystf
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 6,449
Likes (Received): 2183

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattiG View Post
I believe that the investments in Norw3 are not based on point-to-point thinking only, but taking a more holistic view. The one-dimensional roads form a two-dimensional network, and most of the traffic does not flow from an endpoint to another one.

As the map shows, the Rv3 runs through more or less deserted areas. If that route were taken as the main N-S corridor, how would the access to the west coast be arranged? I do not believe there is much sense to create two parallel main motorway-grade corridors Oslo-Trondheim and Oslo-Dombås.
Of course. Although now Rv3 is shorter and faster, E6 will become faster if upgraded to motorway.
italystf no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2016, 04:21 PM   #4386
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,573
Likes (Received): 19366

Fylkesvei 63 to Geiranger

Geiranger is one of the top tourist destinations in Norway. The Geirangerfjord is a UNESCO world heritage.
Most tourists (especially Chinese) arrive by cruise ship or bus and only go up to the two viewpoints.
You'll quickly lose the tourist crowd once you're more than 10 km from Geiranger.

1. Fylkesvei 63 (County Road 63) starts at Riksvei 15, at approximately 930 meters above sea level.

Fylkesvei 63 Geiranger-1 by European Roads, on Flickr

2.

Fylkesvei 63 Geiranger-2 by European Roads, on Flickr

3. The county line between Oppland and Møre og Romsdal. Sogn og Fjordane is just to the left.

Fylkesvei 63 Geiranger-4 by European Roads, on Flickr

4.

Fylkesvei 63 Geiranger-7 by European Roads, on Flickr

5. Djupevatnet, a lake near the highest point of fylkesvei 63, at just over 1,000 m altitude.

Fylkesvei 63 Geiranger-8 by European Roads, on Flickr

6. The descent to Geiranger starts.

Fylkesvei 63 Geiranger-10 by European Roads, on Flickr

7. Fylkesvei 63 drops 1000 meters down to the fjord. The descent is in two stages with hairpin turns. There is a more level valley at 400 m altitude between the two sections with hairpin turns.

Fylkesvei 63 Geiranger-12 by European Roads, on Flickr

8. The most famous viewpoint at approximately 280 meters altitude.

Fylkesvei 63 Geiranger-14 by European Roads, on Flickr

9. Panorama.

Fylkesvei 63 Geiranger-16 by European Roads, on Flickr
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2016, 10:14 PM   #4387
MichiH
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Lower Franconia
Posts: 4,403
Likes (Received): 2081

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The 33 kilometer long new E6 from Frya to Sjoa (Ringebu - Otta) will open to traffic on 17 December.

It looks motorway-like...
I thought it's 2 or 3-laned only... 1 carriageway.

Does it feature 2 carriageway on the whole new 33km stretch?
__________________

Which new motorways are currently under construction?
Which new motorways will be opened next?

See 'New motorway projects' thread

** Please help completing and updating of the list **

Been/driven: A, AND, B, CDN, CH, CZ, D, DK, E, EST, F, FIN, FL, GB, H, I, L, LV, LT, N, NL, P, PL, RO, S, SLO, USA (My cumulative travel mapping)
MichiH no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2016, 10:45 PM   #4388
metasmurf
Registered User
 
metasmurf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Umeå, Sweden
Posts: 374
Likes (Received): 555

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiH View Post
It looks motorway-like...
I thought it's 2 or 3-laned only... 1 carriageway.

Does it feature 2 carriageway on the whole new 33km stretch?
The official term is 2-lane road with passing lanes. This means that the road will be mostly 1+1 with occasional sections of 2+1 or in this case 2+2. For example, E6 north of Lillehammer has a short 2+2 stretch.
__________________

MichiH, Mathias Olsen liked this post
metasmurf no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2016, 11:05 PM   #4389
Mathias Olsen
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 125
Likes (Received): 149

NPRA plans a new Haugesund bypass for E39 and a new E134 to Skjold. When Rogfast project will be ready in 2023 there will be a motorway from Stavanger to Haugesund. Some alternative will be discussed on October 4.

__________________

Stafangr, berlinwroclaw, devo liked this post
Mathias Olsen no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2016, 11:10 PM   #4390
Mathias Olsen
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 125
Likes (Received): 149

Quote:
Originally Posted by metasmurf View Post
The official term is 2-lane road with passing lanes. This means that the road will be mostly 1+1 with occasional sections of 2+1 or in this case 2+2. For example, E6 north of Lillehammer has a short 2+2 stretch.
Yes, the kind of road as from Kolomoen to Lillehammer. This new road is at this moment the biggest new road construction in Norway. The topography is not easy.

__________________

gr_kanev, berlinwroclaw, pai nosso, 8166UY liked this post
Mathias Olsen no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2016, 11:44 PM   #4391
Gsus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 148
Likes (Received): 53

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathias Olsen View Post
Yes, the kind of road as from Kolomoen to Lillehammer. This new road is at this moment the biggest new road construction in Norway. The topography is not easy.

No such road between Kolomoen and Lillehammer! Kolomoen-Lillehammer is mostly a 10-meter wide two-lane road that in the recent years has gotten a central guard rail on some sections, most notably over Rudshøgda and from Biri to Vingrom.

The closest section with this standard is the E6 between Øyer and Tretten (15-30km north of Lillehammer). The Frya-Sjoa section will have passing lanes on roughly half of the sections that are not tunneled, which is a very high share compared to current minimum demands for passing in handbook N100 (before 2013 there was demand on passing lanes for 3km pr. 10km of road, now only defined as 1 passing lane pr. 10km (AADT 6-8k)).

A really good thing between Frya and Sjoa is that all major bridges in the line of road is built with passing lanes in both directions, with the sole exeption of the bridge over Lågen at Kvam (which wont have a central guard rail). The road tho run right into a tunnel on the western side of that bridge, and demands for minimum distances between two tunnel bores is anyway only solved with a new separate bridge. All overpasses is long enough for a 17,5 meter four lane profile, and smaller structures like culverts passing under the road is build as easily expandable structures. Both of the tunnels is zoned for two bores, and the area at the portals have already been blasted out and prepared for a second bore.

So even with a possible future throug running four lanes, this road will never become a full motorway, and that is perfectly fine I think. The AADT today is only 5000-6500 except for some short sections inside urban areas. At opening, I´m guessing 4500-5500 on the new road. Gonna be a loooong time before a 17,5 meter profile and double tunnels won`t be able to take away the traffic there. And by then technology might have caugt well ut will todays congestions problems
Gsus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2016, 01:44 AM   #4392
54°26′S 3°24′E
Registered User
 
54°26′S 3°24′E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 811
Likes (Received): 155

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattiG View Post
I believe that the investments in Norway are not based on point-to-point thinking only, but taking a more holistic view. The one-dimensional roads form a two-dimensional network, and most of the traffic does not flow from an endpoint to another one.

As the map shows, the Rv3 runs through more or less deserted areas. If that route were taken as the main N-S corridor, how would the access to the west coast be arranged? I do not believe there is much sense to create two parallel main motorway-grade corridors Oslo-Trondheim and Oslo-Dombås.
There is a reason that both Rv3 and E6 are national roads. The two roads are not parallel and serves clearly distinct purposes. This will always be the case for trucks and also for cars unless all investments stop on Rv3 and E6 Kolomoen-Dombås-Ulsberg is turned into a motorway the whole way. Hence, bringing in E6 Gudbrandsdalen when discussing solutions Oslo - Trøndelag is just rhetorics (which of course are frequently used by people living along E6 and users of E136). Oh, and btw, Rv3 IS the main N-S corridor, as acknowledged by countless Vegvesen reports and national transport plans etc.

Even if E6 all the way were built as a motorway, which will be controversial and quite expensive due to the topography, it will not be a real competitor to air travel because the distance is simply too long even at 120-130 km/h. This is in contrast to Rv3. Otherwise this topic has been discussed time and again here, and I am convinced that an Rv3 motorway project would be economically beneficial for the nation.
__________________

TrojaA liked this post

Last edited by 54°26′S 3°24′E; September 30th, 2016 at 01:53 AM.
54°26′S 3°24′E no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2016, 10:02 AM   #4393
berlinwroclaw
Kamienna
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 139
Likes (Received): 46

Quote:
Originally Posted by 54°26′S 3°24′E View Post
Even if E6 all the way were built as a motorway, which will be controversial and quite expensive due to the topography, it will not be a real competitor to air travel because the distance is simply too long even at 120-130 km/h. This is in contrast to Rv3.
Yes, for a country where paved roads were not such a long time ago a luxury thing, driving a motorway Oslo-Trondheim may be a trip to the moon for many people. But when you should live for a month in other countries, you will get used to the fact to take a car for such a distance. You don't have to wait for the plane, but can go any moment, traveling direct from A to B, etc. Comparing traveling time in Europe, Norway is always on the bottom of the list. It is therefore very sad that still no top 3 city is connected by motorway in Norway.
__________________
Have a safe trip!

Last edited by berlinwroclaw; September 30th, 2016 at 10:24 AM.
berlinwroclaw no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2016, 01:36 PM   #4394
VITORIA MAN
on skycrapercity
 
VITORIA MAN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: vitoria
Posts: 8,395
Likes (Received): 14404

its strange for us in spain , whith the money you have
VITORIA MAN no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2016, 03:22 PM   #4395
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,573
Likes (Received): 19366

Air travel has several disadvantages, such as high ticket prices at desirable times or inconvenient timetables.

Last weekend I went to Italy for two days. Instead of flying, we took the car for 1200 km, it was *much* cheaper even with tolls/vignette/fuel and the cheapest airfares were at ungodly hours, such as landing Saturday morning and leaving Sunday morning at 6 .a.m., significantly reducing the effective time to be there. Not to mention the only airport with a larger number of flights was nearly 200 km from our destination (Lake Garda).

I think an Oslo - Trondheim motorway will be much more competitive to air travel than in the current situation. 5-6 hours of driving may seem long compared to a one-hour flight, but it becomes more interesting when traveling with multiple persons (cost) and you're much more flexible in time. Driving such distances is very common in countries like Germany or France.
__________________

my clinched highways / travel mapping • highway photography @ Flickr and Youtube

berlinwroclaw, Mathias Olsen liked this post
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2016, 04:03 PM   #4396
italystf
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 6,449
Likes (Received): 2183

Is travelling medium-long distances by car common in Norway? Do a lot of people drive between main cities in the South (Oslo, Bergen, Stavanger, Trondheim, Alesund), and to Sweden? Or almost everyone fly and use the car only locally?
__________________
“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
italystf no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2016, 09:12 PM   #4397
OnTheNorthRoad
Hei
 
OnTheNorthRoad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Oslo
Posts: 613
Likes (Received): 2617

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Air travel has several disadvantages, such as high ticket prices at desirable times or inconvenient timetables.
There are 30 departures from Oslo to Trondheim every day. On average, there's a plane going every 25 mins or so. I travel to Trondheim quite often because of family there and when I was a kid and travelled with my parents, we always drove (usually RV3). Regardless if a new road shaves off an hour in driving time, I would never on my own initiative choose to drive. Both getting to OSL and taking the plane is super easy and relaxing; driving is a night mare in comparison (seriously watching out for moose in the darkness..). Most of my friends and ppl I know in my age group see it the exact same way. The money issue is actually in favour of air travel, since many young people living in Oslo don't need to own a car. Air fares are nothing compared to the costs of car ownership. The biggest issue is actually transport from Værnes to Trondheim, which is not great.

Quote:
Last weekend I went to Italy for two days. Instead of flying, we took the car for 1200 km, it was *much* cheaper even with tolls/vignette/fuel and the cheapest airfares were at ungodly hours, such as landing Saturday morning and leaving Sunday morning at 6 .a.m., significantly reducing the effective time to be there. Not to mention the only airport with a larger number of flights was nearly 200 km from our destination (Lake Garda).
Well, it seems like dutch people like to drive But no, road trip in northern Italy is great fun, I've done the same. But there's a difference between travel and transport. "Normal" norwegians wouldn't consider driving to central or southern europe for instance, or driving to northern norway. Aint really got anything to do with road quality.

Quote:
I think an Oslo - Trondheim motorway will be much more competitive to air travel than in the current situation. 5-6 hours of driving may seem long compared to a one-hour flight, but it becomes more interesting when traveling with multiple persons (cost) and you're much more flexible in time. Driving such distances is very common in countries like Germany or France.
It will be *more* competitive, obviously, but you will never get biz passengers, which take a big share of air travel btw OSL and TRD to drive. Train > Car.

Families probably drive more often already, due to 1) it not being biz related obv and 2) costs, but still. The norwegians that are hooked onto air travel won't change and train is a more realistic alternative in the future imo (since it's more comfortable).
__________________

MichiH liked this post

Last edited by OnTheNorthRoad; September 30th, 2016 at 09:28 PM.
OnTheNorthRoad no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2016, 09:26 PM   #4398
OnTheNorthRoad
Hei
 
OnTheNorthRoad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Oslo
Posts: 613
Likes (Received): 2617

Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Is travelling medium-long distances by car common in Norway? Do a lot of people drive between main cities in the South (Oslo, Bergen, Stavanger, Trondheim, Alesund), and to Sweden? Or almost everyone fly and use the car only locally?
On Oslo-Bergen and Oslo-Trondheim, plane has a market share above 50%. A study from 2011 found 51% and 52% respectively.

The market share is very high for work related trips and very high during winter. The market share for car is elevated by leisure travelling during summer, when families often travel by car.

I don't think it's any less for Oslo-Stavanger given that it's more of a hassle to get to Stavanger not using air travel.
OnTheNorthRoad no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2016, 09:29 PM   #4399
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,573
Likes (Received): 19366

You're describing a narrow age group, old enough to make money, but young enough for many not to have a family yet. Car ownership rapidly maxes out when people start a family, and I don't think that people living in central Oslo are the prime audience for motorway travel between two cities.
__________________

my clinched highways / travel mapping • highway photography @ Flickr and Youtube

berlinwroclaw liked this post
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2016, 09:35 PM   #4400
OnTheNorthRoad
Hei
 
OnTheNorthRoad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Oslo
Posts: 613
Likes (Received): 2617

That is true, but my travel pattern fit with the majority of trips. Families don't travel that often between Oslo and Trondheim, except during summer and holidays. And it's not uncommon for families to travel by plane either.

I think it's easy to say that my generation will become just like the generations before us when we "grow up", but we are breaking a lot of trends when it comes to car ownership and use, even when you control for age. Had the supply of inner city living been bigger, the trends would have been even stronger. Some of us will get cars and houses when we establish families, while others will try to keep living centrally and find solutions, even if we get children. The biggest obstacle is on the supply side; the housing market isn't able to keep up with the changing wants.

Last edited by OnTheNorthRoad; September 30th, 2016 at 09:56 PM.
OnTheNorthRoad no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
norway

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium