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Old October 12th, 2016, 05:33 PM   #4441
ChrisZwolle
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A breakthrough of the Eiganes Tunnel in Stavanger (part of the Ryfast project) has been achieved today. The Eiganes Tunnel is a 3.7 km long twin-tube tunnel. There will be an underground interchange to the Hundvåg Tunnel.

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Old October 12th, 2016, 06:15 PM   #4442
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Switzerland and Austria are more densely popoulated than Norway and have a lot of international through traffic that Norway obviously don't have.
That doesn’t say that Norway doesn’t need better infrastructure. Within the government, here and on all media in Norway it has been discussed by e.g. Bård Hoksrud (Secretary Ministry of Transport) that Norway has the slowest speed on the road between the biggest cities in Europe and can learn about motorway construction from Albania.



Also NPRA did not deny that there is a need for more infrastructure investments. The good thing is that the government responds by raising the road infrastructure budget with the intention to invest in new and better roads.
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Old October 12th, 2016, 07:02 PM   #4443
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That doesn’t say that Norway doesn’t need better infrastructure.
Absolutely. But it doesn't mean that Norway should be shamed by its infrastructure, as berlinwroclaw suggest. Nor does it mean that Norway should focus on reaching some arbitrary goal like getting average speeds on empty cross-country roads up, nor on linking the largest cities with a certain standard of road, rather than spending the money where it would be most usefully spent (which often enough is on stuff that helps achieve those goals).
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Old October 12th, 2016, 10:50 PM   #4444
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But it doesn't mean that Norway should be shamed by its infrastructure
Sorry that you concluded that way, I only wanted to discuss the speed of road mobility. Norway has worldclass infrastructure e.g. with traffic management, new Rogfast motorway tunnels, many other tunnels and bridges. It has also the best road safety in the world. I only hope that some limitations on the roads to big cities will be improved. I think it will help to stimulate tourism and will help to make daily life cheaper on the westcoast.
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Old October 12th, 2016, 11:08 PM   #4445
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Norway does have the lowest fatality rate of Europe, however it also has the highest rate of fatal accidents involving semi trucks. This is due to the poor design of roads for long-distance trucking and the very low share of vehicle kilometers being driven on divided highways (only 8%, in most countries it's 40-60%).
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Old October 13th, 2016, 12:21 PM   #4446
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Switzerland and Austria are more densely popoulated than Norway and have a lot of international through traffic that Norway obviously don't have. Moreover, most of their motorways run across populated valleys and there is no the fjords problem.
Most Norwegians live in Southern Norway; an all country density is not representative. Biggest cities are comparable with narrow band with.
Population density Austria.

1. Wien = 1.8 million, 2. Graz = 0.266 m, 3. Linz = 0.184 m, 4. Salzburg = 0.144 m



Population density Southern Norway

1. Oslo = 1.7 million, 2. Bergen = 0.278 m, 3. Trondheim = 0.179 m, Stavanger = 0.133 m




Therefore transport specialists, including Norwegian politicians, still compare Norway with Switzerland and Austria. Construction of A1 Wien-Salzburg (after the war) started in 1954 and A2 Wien-Graz started in 1959. Topography was not easier than on E6 / Rv 3 Oslo – Trondheim. Austria has 2 mountain motorways, while Norway hasn’t a single one. However, for Norway the number one country to compare is Sweden. Minister of Transport, said:

Quote:
Ketil Solvik-Olsen, 28-07-2016
In Sweden they succeed in building motorways for a far lower cost. I do not think Norwegian motorists who have driven on Swedish motorways, experience that Swedish roads are no good. Some of the price difference is due to topography and geography - that we must live with. “Nye Veier” also believes that there are great savings to be made in how we organize and execute road projects.
http://www.solvikolsen.com/2016/07/b...kke-darligere/
“Nye Veier” is a road construction organisation to construct motorways faster, better and cheaper. First projects are missing links E18 Drammen-Kristiansand and E39 Kristiansand-Stavanger.
It is a dramatic political change for road constructions in Norway to transfer budget for local projects to national projects. The hard issue is not that there is not enough money, but the fact that most of the budget goes to countless local projects for thin populated areas with no national impact. This has been changed by the Minister of Transport:

Quote:
Ketil Solvik-Olsen, 28-07-2016
There are many things that are not strictly necessary, but that is "nice to have" while others take the bill. Therefore, we must set limits which want local politicians and interest groups to get repaid.
http://www.solvikolsen.com/2016/07/b...kke-darligere/
Finally there is governance to build four-lane motorways where the previous government believed the two-lane roads were enough We have to see how this kind of promises will come true. The test case will be the National Transport Plan in summer 2017. Needed is a decision to put at least the construction of the motorway Bergen-Oslo in the “Nye Veier” organisation. A big "nice to have" will be Trondheim-Oslo.
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Old October 15th, 2016, 12:34 PM   #4447
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Finally there is governance to build four-lane motorways where the previous government believed the two-lane roads were enough We have to see how this kind of promises will come true. The test case will be the National Transport Plan in summer 2017. Needed is a decision to put at least the construction of the motorway Bergen-Oslo in the “Nye Veier” organisation. A big "nice to have" will be Trondheim-Oslo.
Some generalising statements about motorways from the Minister of Transport are unfortunately not a guarantee that the construction of the East-West motorway will start soon. And about Ketil Solvik-Olsen: it would create more trust, when he is able to apply his own rules for infrastructure investments to his own job about what is “must” and “nice to have”. Now he is fighting “at all price” for Hordfast with a 110 km/h motorway to Bergen over a floating bridge of 43 billion. That is what I call "nice to have" while others take the bill. Other members of the government have objections to such a huge investment. Better look at an integrated network, such as the inner E39 Bergen-Haugesund that can be combined with the Bergen Arm. This will also help to the growing commuter traffic east of Bergen. That is more strictly necessary for now. I won’t be surprised when finally the expressway network in the West will look like the proposal NPRA already did in 2006:



More and more people are aware that such a network is more interesting for all Rogaland and Hordaland than putting much budget on a 43 billion road and doing nothing on the rest for a long time.
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Old October 15th, 2016, 12:55 PM   #4448
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Two things are important regarding future development of the road network:
1. That the politicians are less "hands on" with regard to implementing lots of break of standard for short-term financial benefits. In other words: Let the people who are educated do the work in planning the infrastructure. No other segment (such as water, sewage and so on) faces this kind of involvement from politicians.
2. That there exists an agreement on what the national high-capacity road network should look like, and that, for instance, E 6 and E 134 are planned as 110 km/h motorway and then built as efficient and cost-effective as possible. If this means building one tube and later twinning it (which is happening with E 6 Gudbrandsdalen) then that is what needs to be done. But having political battles every year on where every little bend should be is extremely ineffective.
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Old October 17th, 2016, 06:59 PM   #4449
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The 6.2 km segment of E18 motorway from Retvet to Knapstad (east of Oslo) will open to traffic on 25 November.

http://www.vegvesen.no/vegprosjekter...napstad-retvet

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Old October 17th, 2016, 07:33 PM   #4450
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That there exists an agreement on what the national high-capacity road network should look like, and that, for instance, E 6 and E 134 are planned as 110 km/h motorway and then built as efficient and cost-effective as possible. If this means building one tube and later twinning it (which is happening with E 6 Gudbrandsdalen) then that is what needs to be done. But having political battles every year on where every little bend should be is extremely ineffective.
Yes, indeed we are looking for agreement on what the national high-capacity road network should look like. When possible, it would be nice to have already a preview before the approval of the National Transport Plan and the Motorway Plan.
Motorways E6 Oslo-Trondheim and E134 Oslo-Bergen can be ready in 10 years from now.
http://www.tu.no/artikler/firefelts-...onnsomt/239410

Best would be to construct the motorways immediately, but it won’t be easy to get parliament approval for a 60 billion E134 Bergen-Oslo or a 20 billion missing links Trondheim-Oslo.
Present policy is to construct an expressway first on E134 Bergen-Oslo and E6 Trondheim-Oslo and when traffic volume is growing (and it will grow for sure) they upgrade to motorway. But this approach isn’t only a waste of money, when you want to upgrader later. The 2+1 roads with separated carriageways are sometimes annoying. Today an accident on E6 in Levanger when a truck overturned.



The median makes it difficult for large vehicles to get turned:

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Old October 17th, 2016, 08:51 PM   #4451
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2+1 with a central barrier is a ridiculous standard for precisely that reason. The additional cost for 2+2 will be small relative to the benefits.
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Old October 17th, 2016, 10:17 PM   #4452
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Norway does have the lowest fatality rate of Europe, however it also has the highest rate of fatal accidents involving semi trucks. This is due to the poor design of roads for long-distance trucking and the very low share of vehicle kilometers being driven on divided highways (only 8%, in most countries it's 40-60%).
You'll also find that most of those trucks involved in accidents are foreign registered, usually from Eastern Europe, traveling over Norwegian mountain passes in winter on summer tires and mostly with single axel tractor units. Norwegian operators almost as always use dual axel tractors and winter tires are of course mandatory.
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Old October 17th, 2016, 10:24 PM   #4453
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Do you get more traction with dual rear axles? You'd think more weight on a single axle means more traction, but I've noticed most Scandinavian trucks indeed have tandem rear axles.

Another problem with foreign truckers is that they're not used to winter driving on long, winding two-lane roads. For example in the Alps most truckers stay on the motorway network, whereas such a motorway network is absent in much of Norway. Foreign truckers would very rarely drive across Alpine passes, while that is unavoidable in Norway to reach cities on the coast. Many southern European truckers don't even know how to chain up.

Statens Vegvesen has reported that after increased enforcement over the past few years, foreign truckers are now generally better equipped than before, however trucks cause a lot of trouble on the roads still, especially due to the lack of alternate routes in many locations.

A Highway Thru Hell series based in Norway could be rather interesting
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Old October 17th, 2016, 10:38 PM   #4454
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Quote:
Originally Posted by devo View Post
Two things are important regarding future development of the road network:
1. That the politicians are less "hands on" with regard to implementing lots of break of standard for short-term financial benefits. In other words: Let the people who are educated do the work in planning the infrastructure. No other segment (such as water, sewage and so on) faces this kind of involvement from politicians.
2. That there exists an agreement on what the national high-capacity road network should look like, and that, for instance, E 6 and E 134 are planned as 110 km/h motorway and then built as efficient and cost-effective as possible. If this means building one tube and later twinning it (which is happening with E 6 Gudbrandsdalen) then that is what needs to be done. But having political battles every year on where every little bend should be is extremely ineffective.
There is a long tradition in Parliament that there is a combination of state funds from the state budget, county agents and municipal funds, in addition to toll funding. According to the Ministry of Finance it is a good system. They are afraid another funding will mean that parliament eventually lose track of developments in the Norwegian economy. But it may be a better idea to organise infrastructure as a separate investment project where part or all of the loan amount is collected from individuals, companies, life insurance companies, investors and pension funds.

Problem with the new governmental road construction organisation Nye Veier is that it didn’t select most profitable road projects, such as E134 Notodden-Drammen or Rv 23. The E39 Kristiansand-Sandnes has a predicted AADT of 6000-8000 far below the E134 east of Notodden of 8000-13500. People who do not win on the new E39 are living in central eastern Norway, but they will win in case of the E134 and Rv 23.
In past years Germany borrowed Norwegian oil money almost for free to build roads, while Norwegian road projects had to take out loans to three times higher rate. Germany has borrowed from the oil fund to 1.8 percent interest to build roads. On the other side, the E6 motorway upgrade from Gardermoen to Kolomoen to 7.1 billion was partly financed with a loan at 6.5 percent interest from European countries. A ridiculous situation.

Norway should use more of its oil wealth to invest in profitable road projects. There is a big need for new national infrastructure in Norway, perhaps more than in Germany. Norway will have at the end of 2016 only 626 km four lane motorways. This should have been 1.200 km to be in line with European standards. http://www.aftenposten.no/norge/poli...r-606167b.html The NPRA has no authority to manage this. This is a purely political issue.
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Old October 17th, 2016, 11:17 PM   #4455
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Why E134 Oslo-Bergen?
E134 only goes to Haugesund, unless they also make E39 Bergen-Stavanger ferry-free with very long bridges and/or tunnels, that seems a very ambitious goal.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old October 17th, 2016, 11:21 PM   #4456
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Do you get more traction with dual rear axles? You'd think more weight on a single axle means more traction, but I've noticed most Scandinavian trucks indeed have tandem rear axles.
You cannot put unlimited load on a single axle. For example, the maximum axle load is 11.5 tons in Finland. In practice, if you want to go beyond the magic EU default of max 40 tons total weight, you need a lot of axles. The maximum load is 76 tons in Finland. That requires nine axles in 1+3+2+3 or 2+3+1+3 configuration, and most axles of the trailer must have twin tires. If you want to go 68 tons or above, the 4-wheel drive is mandatory.
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Old October 17th, 2016, 11:23 PM   #4457
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You'll also find that most of those trucks involved in accidents are foreign registered, usually from Eastern Europe, traveling over Norwegian mountain passes in winter on summer tires and mostly with single axel tractor units. Norwegian operators almost as always use dual axel tractors and winter tires are of course mandatory.
It is understandable that you are looking at a Norwegian perspective. But have you ever been on major mountain passes in winter in Czechia, Poland, Slovenia or Croatia? You will notice most of the major mountain passes are motorways and in other cases you will find decent 2 lane roads where trucks don't have problems to pass each other. Please try to understand the perspective of a foreigner who is used to drive on a motorway or wide 2 lane road, where it is no problem to have summer tires and single ax tractor units in winter. In Norway in 2017 ca. 14 percent of the the 1550 km state roads will remain too narrow to satisfy the demands of two-lane road with yellow centerline. Norwegian road are also steeper and have more curves. That means that trucks will have problems to pass. And yes, many of those too narrow roads are mountain roads.

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Old October 17th, 2016, 11:38 PM   #4458
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Why E134 Oslo-Bergen?
E134 only goes to Haugesund, unless they also make E39 Bergen-Stavanger ferry-free with very long bridges and/or tunnels, that seems a very ambitious goal.
A new road from Bergen via Odda to Skare is projected. It is called the "Bergen Arm" to the E134. When the National Transport Plan has been approved in summer 2017, there will be more certainty about such a road. There is massive support from business companies and the counties on the road and economic analysis predicts a high positive social impact for the country. This topic has been discussed in detail since June 2016 here on SSC Norway. For a short introduction, refer to http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3720.
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Old October 18th, 2016, 12:01 AM   #4459
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Do you get more traction with dual rear axles? You'd think more weight on a single axle means more traction, but I've noticed most Scandinavian trucks indeed have tandem rear axles
Two axles are an advantage in winter because the rear axle an be lifted to shift more weight to the axle with traction, if needed.
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Old October 18th, 2016, 12:04 AM   #4460
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You'll also find that most of those trucks involved in accidents are foreign registered, usually from Eastern Europe, traveling over Norwegian mountain passes in winter on summer tires and mostly with single axel tractor units. Norwegian operators almost as always use dual axel tractors and winter tires are of course mandatory.
I disagree with your sweeping statement. There is no evidence to suggest that "most of those trucks involved in accidents are foreign registered, usually from Eastern Europe".
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