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Old April 29th, 2009, 11:38 PM   #541
Ingenioren
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A trip from Ring 3 to Strømmen and back, photos are taken around 2-3 in the afternoon:



Beginning on the intersection between E6 and Ring 3:


Entering a very short expressway with wire-lighting first:


A local exit:


Beginning of the motorway:


Merging with the Rv190 expressway from downtown Oslo:


Trough Groruddalen E6 is mostly 8-lanes wide, local/freight railway-line passes on a bridge above:


The lane to the right is dedicated to Taxi, Emergency vehicles, Buses and also Electric cars are allowed:


Alnabru exit:


A cool noise-barrier:


A lot of bridges crosses this suburban motorway, the small road to the right is comming from a bus-stop and leads directly to a ramp, bus-stops aren't allowed on the motorway so they are located in relation to exits like this:


Still, another bridge is under construction, the valley-populations dream is to hide the whole E6 someday:


Strømmen - Exit not far away:


E6 exit numbers starts here, the 42 number seems a bit random.


2 smaller motorways split, Rv159 to the suburbs to the east, while E6 leads parallell for a few km, but turns north eventually, the high light-masts are far from typical but used on the large motorway, here


Entering a new country and commune, but the suburbs sprawl past those limits:


Not a high-standard motorway, it only has 90km/h speed limit.


The Lørenskog suburb is in growt, and the motorway cuts right trough it, a new bridge has been opened this year:


Double-exit, instead of numbers, the intersections are named:


The Strømmen exit is a joint accelleration and exit lane:


This exit has ramps to the west exclusively, and runs right into a tunnel:


Exiting the tunnel, the old road trough Fjellhamar is turned into a community-friendly road that the Vegvesenet loves so much:


Entering Strømmen, generously signed - this is far from standard:


Small urban roundabout:


Heading back now, 180 degrees from where the last picture is taken:


Funny tracks in the road:


Entering the tunnel from the other side:


And arriving directly on the motorway:


The newest part of Rv159 has wire-barriers and poles on both sides:




This is the older part:


Leading to E6 north and Rv163 - Oslo is the worst when it comes to signing riksveier.


This is not a grade free route, as is very common for motorways meeting:


Welcome to Oslo, driving under E6:


Merging to a the 8 lane road:


Both right lanes is good for Lindeberg:


Always busy road-stretch, the Grorudvalley is one big pile of roads it has 2 additional expressways running parallell to E6 aswell:


Exit for bus-stop:


Buslane gives way for trafic from the right:


The remains of the old tollring plaza is well on the way:


Splitting into Rv190 left and E6 right, one example of how good Scandinavians are at signing to other countries, Gothenburg is 4 hours away and Stockholm is 6 hours away:


The new toll-ring installations are fully automatic:


Endingpoint of motorway, the bridge above is not being used for anything, one of many ambitious road-plans from the past in Grorudvalley that never came to be:


Campsites are well signed for visitors of our capital:


Meeting Ring3, where we started:
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Old April 29th, 2009, 11:42 PM   #542
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Nice pictures, thanks for the report!

About the exit number 42, is it possible that it might continue from another motorway? Some countries, like France, do that. Autoroute A9 exit numbering continues from the Autoroute A7 numbering for instance.
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Old April 29th, 2009, 11:55 PM   #543
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^ No problem, seeming you guys didn't know the colour of signs in this country it was long overdue Btw. i only take pictures when i'm not driving myself

It's a brand new scheme. Before entering Ring 3 from the south E6 ends with Exit 31, but counting the exits it should be 40, maybe they want to add more, but considering the future plans of tunneling E6 outside of Ring 3 being discussed the number of exits would be much less, i guess there will always be a gap in numberings when the roads are unstatic like in the city-area... But then on E18 the numbers starts at 1 towards the west/Drammen, so how will they number the E18 towards Stockholm? No idea...
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Old April 30th, 2009, 12:05 AM   #544
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Does that automatic toll system use transponders (like EZ Pass) or does it work like the one in London?

How do out-of-towners or visitors from abroad pay the tolls?

Very nice pictures, btw.
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Old April 30th, 2009, 01:17 AM   #545
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Commuters get a "autoPass", that registers everytime you pass. People without one of those can either pay at a nearby gas-station, or else you will recieve a bill in the mail after some passings (or by new year) (even foreigners).

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Entering Strømmen, generously signed - this is far from standard:
http://i584.photobucket.com/albums/s...n/DSC_0175.jpg
I generously disagree. Most towns/boroughs have these signs on enterings from major regional/national roads. Some places in Oslo it's almost ridiculous how many small local names getting signed like this..
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Old April 30th, 2009, 02:33 AM   #546
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ingenioren View Post
Alnabru exit:
That exit is not to Alnabru, the exit to Alnabru is on rv190.
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Old April 30th, 2009, 09:52 AM   #547
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All roads lead to Alnabru, this is the one signed "Alnabruterminalen" (a grand truck to rail freight terminal) to be precise;D Ps. a bit confusing, the exit on Rv190 is only one ramp signed eastbound - and there's 2 unsigned (for aubvious reasons) T-crosses with Ulvenveien aswell, on E6 Ulvensplitten there is another full-scale intersection pointing to "Alnabru":
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Old May 1st, 2009, 02:05 AM   #548
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True. But if you're taking the exit on the picture you posted, you gotta drive back and drive through toll.
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Old May 2nd, 2009, 03:27 AM   #549
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Been there, done that

Now, as Ingeniøren got dangerously close to my home, I show some urban and suburban and not so urban road and highway pictures from a trip I made in my other home, Trondheim, last weekend, 25th of April.
I am sorry for the rather grainy quality, which is due to a combination of dirty windscreen, large compression, and a problem to get a proper focus through the window, I guess...
As there are not that many big roads in Trondheim, the beginning of the picture series is from smaller roads that be found around Trondheim.
The trip starts in the forest above the city, at Skistua in Bymarka. Although Trondheim has had in the range of 15-22 C for a couple of weeks now, decent cross country skiing is reportedly still possible up there.


Driving down a winding road (Fjellsetervegen) down to the city. During nice winter weekends there can be quite a lot of cars here, but now there is also bicycles and runners in the mix.

There is still quite a lot of snow along the road, but very dirty, and not meter-high like it was a month ago.


Roughly 5 minutes from Skistua, I find myself on the main road of the roughly 40 000 strong western suburb of Trondheim called Byåsen. No sign of winter anymore here....

The road (Byåsvegen) soon turn to a normal dual lane road ahead. Other than a 80-year old tramway and this road the transport infrastructure of Byåsen is truely lousy.

After a few roundabouts and a few shorter bridges the road continues towards the southern suburbs of Trondheim Kolstad/Heimdal/Tiller. On the way, the road passes close by the Granåsen world cup/ world championship ski jumping hill (not my picture)

Perhaps time to renew some signs?

Continue across Bjørndalsbrua, one of the bigger bridges of Trondheim.


And straight from there into shopping mall hell, Østre Rosten (this road is often seriously clogged during weekends, and has around 20 000 AADT)

Time to get onto the European higway grid, and northwards towards central Trondheim. The sign is a omnious warning regarding the design of the main exit ramp for Byåsen

Hopefully this ramp will be fixed in a couple of years.

I guess this is the closest Trondheim get to a motorway (sharp turn on ramp, and the fact that the road has this standard for a rather short length, is probably why it is not signed as a motorway). And BTW, there is a serious moose hasard on this part of E6...

For no particular reason, except perhaps the hill, the E6 becomes 6-lane here. With traffic above 50 000 AADT, this is the stretch with the highes traffic in Trondheim.




A picture taken from the east bank of Nidelva , linked from www.panoramio.com/photo/2392461

At the other side of the bridge, the E6 splits. For some stupid reason both the highway that bypasses and goes straigth into central Trondheim has the identical number. (They used to differ) And Narvik, BTW, is 900 km and a ferry to the north, I wonder what percentage of the traffic that planned on going there last Saturday.... (Signage to Sundsvall, Sweden and 450 km to the east via E14, starts at the eastern side of Trondheim)
Edit: Actually, the first Sundsvall /E14 sign is shortly after this split. Most people going from Trondheim to Sweden is however destined either to Åre, Scandinavias biggest skiresort, or Østersund. Both are considerable closer to Trondheim, but Sundsvall is larger and the endpoint of the Swedish E14.

We continue on the bypass. Speed camera is conveniently located right after the ramp, and traffic is around 45000 AADT.

There is a roundabout on top of this intersection called Nardo-krysset. Exit for the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

Exit to another university campus, after which traffic drops from well above 40 000 to just below 30 000. However, the standard improves slightly.



Notice that the right lane is exit only, this lead many to use the left lane for almost the entire length of the road.....

Arrival at Lade, another major shopping-district of Trondheim. This road is as straight as you find them in Trondheim, in fact it used to be an air strip....



Return along the same route.


The convertible-season is rather short....


Time to pay attention, signs are warning against both jams and speed camera.

Another jam-warning sign indicates that we are approaching one of the true bottlenecks of the Trondheim area. And BTW, another right lane exit only, leading to left lane traffic sometimes dominating in both directions on this bypass....

We are keeping to the right towards Byåsen.

This is the cause of all the havoc, this ridiculously narrow bridge called Sluppen bru is one of only to road connections between Byåsen and central Trondheim and the eastern suburbs, and sees more than 21 000 AADT. It ends in a traffic light, and it takes anything from 20 to 40 minutes to go through here during rush hour.

Another picture, from NRK:

Finally it seems like some improvments are on their way, with a revamp of the E6-intersection, a four lane bridge and even a tunnel up to Byåsen. It will be rather steep, however, and consequently will be four lanes as well. The time table is skechy at the moment, however, and it will of course be toll financed....
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Old May 2nd, 2009, 04:29 AM   #550
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The pictures are all really neat. The landscaping is oddly familiar, despite me never having been to Norway.

I'm from northern Minnesota, and many parts of northern Minnesota are very similar, though less mountainous. Some of those shots could easily be I-35 going into Duluth, Minnesota on Lake Superior, though.

Also, the way the freeways are set up running through urban areas reminds me distinctly of many freeways in Minneapolis/St. Paul, where traditional 4 lane traffic light controlled highways were converted into controlled access freeways. The result is a very narrow 4 lane freeway with walls up against the sides.. with buildings right up to the edge on the other side.

I think it's the large amount of conifers and the granite looking bedrock with that reddish color that reminds me so much of Minnesota.
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Old May 2nd, 2009, 12:04 PM   #551
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Very American.
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Old May 3rd, 2009, 02:22 AM   #552
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My first thought was Alaska. Seriously
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Old May 3rd, 2009, 11:01 AM   #553
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Could be, but AFAIK there are no shiny crash barriers in Alaska
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Old May 3rd, 2009, 11:45 PM   #554
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This bridge is in use

[QUOTE=Ingenioren;35943186]

Endingpoint of motorway, the bridge above is not being used for anything, one of many ambitious road-plans from the past in Grorudvalley that never came to be:


[QUOTE]

Hi

That bridge is in fact in use for what it was intended for, not for any motorway scheme, but to connect the to part of the old graveyard bisected by the motorway in the 1970s. The bridge was built extra wide to shield the funeral processions using the bridge, it has only a narrow single lane of pavement but wide grass shoulders.

As for Rv44 mention earlier, that one is built as an expressway and was never intended to be an motorway, it cud of course has been built as one, but that is an economical, and political decision. And the reason for building E6 as a tree lane expressway, not a four lane motorway in the mid 90s was just the same. Until late 1990s, (almost) all highways with AADT up to 45.000 were built as single carriageway expressways (the Norwegian Motorway class B), as you most all know. The reason this has come to a change at all is due to traffic safety concerns.
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Old May 4th, 2009, 12:11 AM   #555
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That was the rather obscure piece of fact! It does sounds like a quite strange way of spending public money, though.


Timon91/Schweden regarding "Alaskan" Trondheim:
In terms of latitude, Trondheim at 63° 36 is more than two degrees north of Anchorage, but south of Fairbanks. But latitude is not everything...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowguy716 View Post
The pictures are all really neat. The landscaping is oddly familiar, despite me never having been to Norway.

I'm from northern Minnesota, and many parts of northern Minnesota are very similar, though less mountainous. Some of those shots could easily be I-35 going into Duluth, Minnesota on Lake Superior, though.

Also, the way the freeways are set up running through urban areas reminds me distinctly of many freeways in Minneapolis/St. Paul, where traditional 4 lane traffic light controlled highways were converted into controlled access freeways. The result is a very narrow 4 lane freeway with walls up against the sides.. with buildings right up to the edge on the other side.

I think it's the large amount of conifers and the granite looking bedrock with that reddish color that reminds me so much of Minnesota.
Thank you for your nice comment. Actually, I used to know Minnesota fairly well, at least Twin Cities area, but have not been there for several years now. As a general note, there is no doubt that the Twin Cities, or Minnesota, road system in general is far superior to what you find in Norway. On the other hand, public transport and, especially, bicycle and foot path network is far better here, at least as compared with Twin Cities 15 years ago. I guess it is possible to argue that the Duluth area and the Trondheim area has some similarities. They are both close to water, have a decent harbor (probably Duluth's bigger, and anyway you cannot see the Trondheim harbor in any of my pictures....) and there are a lot of trees and moose and deer both places However, you won't find a four lane road to relatively small towns like Two Harbors in Norway, and you (hopefully) never will.

Other than that, we are all named Ole and Lena and say "uffda" all the time
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Very American.
Perhaps. We have the yellow paint on the roads (but not on divided highways), and most Norwegian shopping is now in a rather US manner concentrated to quite large shopping malls outside the city, but I guess this is not unique to Norway. Also, Norwegian cities are also dominated by single family houses, although this is slowly changing, especially in the larger cities. However, if you ventured into the central parts of Trondheim, the feel of the city is definately more European than American:




Trondheim is btw more than 1000 years old.

OK, this was perhaps just a little bit OT....
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Old May 4th, 2009, 04:05 PM   #556
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 54°26′S 3°24′E View Post
OK, this was perhaps just a little bit OT....
OT perhaps, but still worth mentioning. And as you know, most cities up here have a very European feel to their centres, partly due to the fact that they're pretty old. Of course, no Norwegian city was much to be considered before the industrial revolution, but still... In addition - and more on topic, perhaps - the age of the cities have caused one or two problems for modern-day traffic volumes as most streets are narrow and areas to build new highways and motorways in are restricted. This is made even more difficult by the fact that most cities are encircled by virtually unspoilt nature whose recreational value is held in high regard.

There was, of course, a brief period in the 60s and 70s where basically anything went, old neighbourhoods were torn down and the natural beauty of surrounding areas wasn't considered all that important. Thus, you'll find seriously overdimentioned highway bridges etc here and there. However, most such scemes were eventually abandoned, typically leaving a few underdimentioned highways to deal with ever increasing traffic. Gradually, these have been improved into dual-lane carriageways or even motorways, but since the 1970s, no urban or suburban motorway have been designed to deal with future traffic volumes. Even the latest projects along the busiest corridors are only designed to deal with the current AADT... if that. The new, 400+ million euro urban tunnel through Bjørvika has an expected AADT in the 110-120,000 range, still, it's just a 3+3. Tunnels where you're likely to see an AADT of 40,000 are going to be 2+2. That's fine, it's just that one lane in each direction will become a bus lane.

To avoid any unnecessary confrontations (and only face the necessary ones): I like the fact that they've saved nature and some old urban areas. Still, when you're actually spending hundreds of millions of euros on infrastructure improvement, why not do it properly..?
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Old May 4th, 2009, 04:25 PM   #557
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Thanks for clearing it up, i have that Knut Boge book lying around, but never got around to read it;D

Some pictures from a trip down to Østfold:

The missing E6-link in Akershus, here we are using the new roadway as the old is being upgraded - it will be 6 lanes for a short stretch here:


Almost the entire length of the new motorway will be tunneled:


The old road has only 1 intersection, and i guess will feed that one with local trafic, don't know if they will alter it in any way to allow bikers or anything:


One old looking tunnel, the trafic is a bit high for this road atm. so i will be glad when i don't have to use it anymore:


In the other end the E6/E18 intersection is getting redone:


Another short 6-lane stretch here:


E6 outside of Moss, all of E6 trough Østfold was built as a 2 lane gradefree road and then upgraded:


Just north of Råde/Fredrikstad intersection:


E6 passes right next to Råde village:


Road-art:


New distance signs, Svinesund is the border - an important destination for many border-shoppers:


For a few km, the asfalt is shiny red:


New bridge (2006):


The motorway from this point opened in 2008:


A part of the road is 5 lanes:


Exit to the old E6, now Rv118 for roadworks:


Getting closer to Sarpsborg, the tall chimney shows the way:


Sarpsborg northern exit:


Bus-stop, here you can take the bus to f.example Berlin:


New round-about:


Still called Old E6 in the peoples tongue, must be a long time ago it ran here tough:


Rv118 cuts trough the heart of Sarpsborg with a lot of light-intersections:


Sarpsborg sentrum is right across that bridge:


Turning back to E6, the Rv114 to Skiptvet is a fun road - for some other time:


Shouldn't E6 south have a motorway symbol aswell?


Back on E6 south:


Rv109 exit, the tall monolith there is lit at night:


Closeup, it's located right at the entry of Sandesund bridge - 1,5 km long. Right bridge new, left is old:


The bridge has overhead signs:


Another new bridge, the old one here was to short, as all the bridges on the stretch built in the 90s, most of the bridges was simply extended, but this one had to go. The stretch past Moss from the 70s (?) were built with long bridges, so nothing had to be done there...


Continuing south:




Southern exit to Fredrikstad and Skjeberg Station (Where no trains stop):




Trees has been planted in the slopes, this road used to be planted full of lupines (beautiful purple flowers planted in the 90s) but those are now black-listed now:




Another art-piece, the part Halden - Border is the only part built from scratch, it's also the narrowest - but still 100km/h. All of Østfold is 100km/h except for the border itself and toll-stations.


The view from Rv21 entering Halden:


Rv21 is a wide street here:


This is Rv22 Østre Tangent, built in the early 90s as a bypass of mainstreet, look at those towering road-lamps:


Another part of Rv22 in the suburbs of Halden:


County-road trough Northern Halden nicknamed the airstrip, not surpricingly 50km/h is hardly driven here:


Back on Rv21 towards E6:


E6 ran here in 2005 being a nightmare with kms of jam in the summer, now it's Rv21 /Rv118:


A few evening shots of E6 going north:


Rv118, Ingedal exit #3:


Love the look of the asfalt here:


Rv110 exit #4:




Back in Sarpsborg:
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Old May 4th, 2009, 10:35 PM   #558
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Lookin' forward to be able to drive from my buddy in Råholt to Strömstad on four-lane E6 only

What do you guys think is the motorway stretch in Norway with the best scenery? I might have to go with E6n past Sharif and onwards, on a sunny day the fields are beautiful! Different strokes for different folks I guess though, haha.

We need to see some pics from E6 north of Trondheim to Finnmark (or someone need to tell me where they are posted if they are)
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Old May 4th, 2009, 10:47 PM   #559
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My vote would go to the Svinesund bridge - except for that E6 follows the flat parts of Østfold as i shown in pictues here. Some of the motorways around Bergen offers nice scenary aswell.. =) Groruddalen is sweet for spotting commieblocks;D

image hosted on flickr
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Old May 4th, 2009, 11:22 PM   #560
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Do you norweigan guys have any motorway pictures from the more "mountainous parts" of the country? is there any motorways there?
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