daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old March 16th, 2011, 02:46 PM   #1281
Ingenioren
Registered User
 
Ingenioren's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Oslo
Posts: 5,605
Likes (Received): 584

I'm the one who posted it. Just saying it is to be implemented on decent with highways with higher traffic in close to towns rather than the narrow turning mountainpass and forrest roads that will keep the 80km/h. E8 trough Lavangsdalen for example is likely to get 70km/h limit.


E8 Lavangsdalen

(Stumbled over a truckers tread with loads of Norwegian highway photos:http://www.berglitruckstop.no/viewto...er=asc&start=0)
__________________
I want to see some construction!

Last edited by Ingenioren; March 16th, 2011 at 02:55 PM.
Ingenioren no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old March 16th, 2011, 02:54 PM   #1282
JeremyCastle
Registered User
 
JeremyCastle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 169
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ingenioren View Post
Foreign contractors likely to win contracts for Dalsfjord bridge




Looks like Dutch HSM BV will be mounting steel while German Bilfinger Berger will poor concrete since they had the cheapest bids for this huge bridge to nowhere.
http://www.vegvesen.no/Vegprosjekter...rua.205056.cms


Who doesn't love these bridges to nowhere? :-) Especially as the E6 during the spring summer is a mass of Norwegian/Dutch/German travellers, and the government refuses to widen stretches of it, such as that infamous bridge that is one lane!(there's a photo on this thread somewhere). Glad the Norwegian government is spending money wisely.

Last edited by JeremyCastle; March 16th, 2011 at 02:55 PM. Reason: Spelling correction.
JeremyCastle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 01:52 AM   #1283
IceCheese
Scandi-friendly
 
IceCheese's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Canada is my city
Posts: 7,228
Likes (Received): 925

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ingenioren View Post
Foreign contractors likely to win contracts for Dalsfjord bridge

http://www.bygg.no/cache/image/31494...rua-bredde.jpg
http://www.vegvesen.no/Vegprosjekter...ts=11d1e9b3ed0

Looks like Dutch HSM BV will be mounting steel while German Bilfinger Berger will poor concrete since they had the cheapest bids for this huge bridge to nowhere.
http://www.vegvesen.no/Vegprosjekter...rua.205056.cms
Wouldn't it be cheaper to just mount a big boat-cabel in the sea, and make ferries automated?
__________________
Oslo/Copenhagen - The True Capital of Scandinavia.


Take a look at my Photo Mess!
IceCheese no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 03:20 PM   #1284
ElviS77
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 564
Likes (Received): 54

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeremyCastle View Post
If you look back a page or two, you'll see that the government has decided to lower speed limits from 80 to 70 on stretches of road so we'll see how many stretches of highway will still be 80. :-/
Some 500 kms all over the country will see a lowered speed limit. Most rural roads will keep the 80 kph limit.
ElviS77 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 09:41 PM   #1285
Seki Pato
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 4
Likes (Received): 0

Allthough I would love to see more highways across Norway I think the only realistic option are:

Oslo-Trondheim
Oslo-Bergen
Oslo-Stavanger

Also, a kind of a highway between Trondheim and the northern cities of Trøndelag and Stavanger-Bergen should also be considered. 4 lane highway through all of western Norway is not realistic. Too many brigdes and tunnels and and not that many people compared to other parts of the country

That said, this only for places I think Highways are necessary, while in general I think the roads all over Norway should get a new standard for safety. My relatives live in Molde and western Norway, and many of those roads scares the crap out of me. I recently served in the army in Troms and the roads in northern Norway aren't any better.

The funny thing is that none of the things I mentioned above will ever be built. Both the red and blue parties and Norway lack balls.
Seki Pato no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 20th, 2011, 04:22 AM   #1286
Oslo 5
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Oslo
Posts: 46
Likes (Received): 0

Traffic safety in Norway

[QUOTE=JeremyCastle;74327683]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oslo 5 View Post

If you increase speed limits(not decrease them), yet improve road quality and safety, and have a variable speed limit in those areas where the limit is 90,100 or higher (speed limit is lowered in bad weather), I suspect accidents will come down. (regardless of size of road)

In narrow 2 lane roads here in the UK(and also in Germany), you have 100km limits much of the time, and there isn't mass numbers of accidents. In Norway, due to the changing weather extremes, you can simply raise of lower the limit depending on weather it is sunny, rainy, snowy, etc... The fact that Germany has a huge amount of traffic compared to Norway with much faster speed limits, yet an equal or lower rate of accidents should tell the Norwegian government something. Yes, I understand the weather aspect, but that again can be taken into account with electronic variable speed limits. I NEVER HEAR that discussed by any Norwegian official. If they have, give me the link please.

I can't believe how naive the Norwegian transport department is in thinking that speed is what we need to kill(not pun intended). They should just ban driving altogether if they are serious about no more accidents.
No, it’s not naive (it’s heavily supported by international traffic safety research). Of course we would like to bring all highways up to good standards, and that’s also the long term goal (in a 30 – 40 years perspective), but that depends on the parliament, and of course in the end on the electorate. In the meantime we need to do something. Variable speed limits has been debated, but it will probably newer happen, not only due to cost, but simply because nobody would take the responsibility to rise and lower the speed limits according to the very rapid changing weather conditions. It would be very difficult to take such decisions; since these persons could be responsible for any fatal accidents (the NPRA told us that the speed limit was safe). It could also be considered unnecessary since all motorists are already obliged to drive according to the weather situation. The speed limit is no mandatory minimum limit, it is the maximum limit. The NPRA has proposed to raise the speed limits on high standard motorways to 110 km/h, but the former Minister of Transport stopped the plans. There are also a hope internally in NPRA that lower speed limits on low standard roads might ignite a higher focus on building more high standard 1+1/1+2 and 2+2 roads.
Oslo 5 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 20th, 2011, 04:32 AM   #1287
Oslo 5
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Oslo
Posts: 46
Likes (Received): 0

Dalsfjordbrua

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeremyCastle View Post
Who doesn't love these bridges to nowhere? :-) Especially as the E6 during the spring summer is a mass of Norwegian/Dutch/German travellers, and the government refuses to widen stretches of it, such as that infamous bridge that is one lane!(there's a photo on this thread somewhere). Glad the Norwegian government is spending money wisely.
As this is a county road it’s all up to the county to decide what they want to spend their money on. The current ferry has a AADT around 25 or so, but the locals has been very good at lobbying (but they have used 30-40 years on this). The main selling point is that this bridge (some day) can be a vital link in a new outer costal highway (or even the new E39).
Oslo 5 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 05:39 AM   #1288
IceCheese
Scandi-friendly
 
IceCheese's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Canada is my city
Posts: 7,228
Likes (Received): 925

While doing an article on a woman sueing the Road authorities after her husband was killed in a motorcykle accident, the newspaper Aftenposten wrote about an investigation by a part of the Natinal road authority. They've analyzed all road accidents leading to death in Region east in 2009. This is in total 60 accidents, with 65 kills. By going deep in this accidents, they make many conclusions. One is especially interesting.

According to them, they've made a statistic on how many death are the responibility of different part. If the road authorities did a better job (orange), if drivers did a better job (red), and finally, those that would've died eitherway (ie suicide by car)(grey). Let us take a look at the pie chart:



It's interesting to see how few cases really could be blamed on drivers. We only hear propaganda warning us to lower speeds, avoid driving in toxication, and using our seatbelts. But how much does it help when tragedy strikes in the end? Not nearly as much as mid-railings or better roads it seems.


Link to study (in Norwegian): http://www.vegvesen.no/_attachment/182317/binary/350360
__________________
Oslo/Copenhagen - The True Capital of Scandinavia.


Take a look at my Photo Mess!
IceCheese no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 12:37 PM   #1289
Ingenioren
Registered User
 
Ingenioren's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Oslo
Posts: 5,605
Likes (Received): 584

One can say a lot about Norwegian roads projects being stupid and unambitious, but the road projects have been getting a lot more focused on aesthetics the last decades. Here is an E18 bridge in Ørje with slender collumns:
__________________
I want to see some construction!
Ingenioren no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2011, 04:50 PM   #1290
JeremyCastle
Registered User
 
JeremyCastle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 169
Likes (Received): 2

This is to follow up on my questions about Norwegian car insurance asked a few weeks ago.

If my wife and I move to Norway(she is Norwegian) this summer, I wanted to find car insurance companies that will accept my US/UK driving record, as it is very good and I am lucky that the same company covers me in both countries. However, since they don't cover me in Norway, have to find a Norwegian company.

So far I have written to the four that were suggested to me on this site, which were Gjensidige, IF, Tryg and Codan. Gjensidige wrote me back and said no, they can't help me. Tryg and Codan haven't written me back yet and IF said they would take my no claim bonus! While that is good news, does any one else know of any other Norwegian insurance companies that might be in a position to help me? It would be horrible if I didn't get the full bonus and was treated as a new driver! :/

Last edited by JeremyCastle; March 23rd, 2011 at 08:39 PM. Reason: Added a ?. :-)
JeremyCastle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2011, 01:03 AM   #1291
KiwiRob
BANNED
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,366
Likes (Received): 5

Jeremy I went through this 5 years ago, the Norwegian insurance companies don't give a crap about your previous driving record, you start from the bottom here and work your way up. Hopefully you have a UK drivers license, if you don't it's going to be expensive changing your US license to a Norwegian one.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I'd say the inferior road design of some long-distance routes is the main problem.
I completely agree with this statement, it would also appear that the Norwegian authourities also agree with you.

Quote:
Death and scandal over bad roads
March 28, 2011

Norway’s notoriously inadequate road system has now left transport officials fending off claims of death and scandal. As a court case opened last week into an accident that cost the life of a father of two, with the road allegedly to blame, reports emerged that brand-new sections of highway literally are cracking up after just one winter. Tax- and toll-paying motorists are disgusted.

Complaints have raged for years: Norway’s highways are mostly two-lane roads prone to head-on accidents, multi-lane highways are few and built on a piecemeal basis with only short stretches opening at a time, traffic jams remain even after new roads open because they’re under-dimensioned, and road-building is wildly expensive, with just a new eight-kilometer stretch of the E18 highway through Østfold costing NOK 1.3 billion (nearly USD 200 million).

Now, reported newspaper Aftenposten over the weekend, that new stretch of highway already has been seriously damaged by what the Norwegians call telehiv: Water gathered under the road’s top layer, and when it froze during the winter, it made the road buckle. Motorists liken it to a roller-coaster feel when driving. The problem has also occurred on several other stretches of new highway around southern Norway.

Highway officials, and the contractors that worked on the project, appear baffled. “We don’t have an overview over what’s happened,” project leader Bettina Sandvin of the state highway department (Statens vegvesen) told Aftenposten. “But everyone agrees that there shouldn’t be telehiv damage on a brand-new highway.” She won’t rule out that the stretch of road around Hobøl, between Ski and Ørje, may have to be dug up again.

Motorists who had looked forward to the new highway for many years, are dumbfounded. “This is almost like a bad joke,” Geir Johansen, who lives in nearby Askim and drives a lot around Østfold, told Aftenposten. The road opened only last November, with much pomp and even Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg in attendance, and now it’s full of cracks and potholes. And this is the main highway between Oslo and Stockholm.

Across the border, Swedish highways are widely considered to be a joy to drive on. Most of the E18 highway on the Swedish side of the border is divided and multi-lane, and even the two-lane sections have wide shoulders making them nearly four-lane roads. “Norwegian highways are not very good,” said motorist Terese Syr, who suspects poor workmanship for the trouble at Hobøl. “They’re not like roads in Sweden.”

Call in the Swedes, or the Chinese
Lars Erik Hauer, director for roads and transport at the highway department, fielded questions from frustrated motorists in an online forum on aftenposten.no, and had to admit that Swedish roads are better and tolerate the same rough winters found in Norway: “We see that the Swedes are in fact better than us, and we want to learn more from them to reduce fatal accidents.”

Or, hopefully, the damage from telehiv. Hauer, however, claimed Norway will never be able to “build its way out of traffic problems,” because new ones crop up all the time. He noted that politicians in the cities are funneling money into improving public transport instead of roads. And recent increases in state funding still aren’t enough to offset years of neglect. He said that in April, his department will release an overview of how much would be needed. He claimed his department was building longer stretches of highway at a time, downplaying criticism over Norway’s longtime piecemeal approach that clearly is far more expensive than major highway projects that would have better economies of scale.

The issue of poor highway planning and construction in Norway has also come up in recent debates over use of money from the state Oil Fund. It’s mostly being invested in stocks and now real estate outside Norway, to fund future pensions, but calls are growing to use more of it to improve Norwegian infrastructure at home. Economists worry that will boost inflation, but one local economist recently proposed “thinking big” and actually putting out large bids for overseas firms to come to Norway and build large projects, instead of relying on Norway’s relatively small labour pool and number of contractors.

Terra’s chief economist Jan Andreassen suggested bringing in Chinese engineers and road builders. “They are better than we are at this,” he told Aftenposten earlier this month. “We’re not good at building roads and railroads in Norway, we need help. We need to look at the entire way road building is organized. The Chinese have won large bids in eastern Europe. We need to ease our rules and make it easier for foreign experts to win jobs here.” Having foreign workers do the job would reduce inflation fears and get the job done right, Andreassen suggested.
http://www.newsinenglish.no/2011/03/...ver-bad-roads/
KiwiRob no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2011, 01:42 AM   #1292
Galro
Humanity through Urbanity
 
Galro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 12,347
Likes (Received): 10030

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ingenioren View Post
Reducing the speed limits on Norwegian highways

New criteria for speed-limits means 420 km of 80 km/h highway will get reduced to 70km/h and 70 km of 90 km/h will be reduced to 80 km/h. Goal of this reduction is 10-15 less deaths/serious injuries per year.

http://www.vegvesen.no/Om+Statens+ve...Vis?key=203760
All speed limits should be lifted immediately imho. Instead we should put up danger signs where there are real dangers (like elk passings etc.) and let the driver decide what is the fitting speed for the situation. What is safe speed depends on so many factors (your skills, the car etc, wheater conditions) it is simply stupid to have a fixed limit.

If you as driver need a sign to tell you the fitting speed then you should be taken the license away from you. You simply are not capable of driving.
Galro no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2011, 01:47 PM   #1293
Ingenioren
Registered User
 
Ingenioren's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Oslo
Posts: 5,605
Likes (Received): 584

You mean police would use their own common sense to determine when you are driving dangerously, and knick your license?

I don't agree in the previous article that Swedish roads aren't suffering from Telehiv like Norwegian, you can see the exact same phenomenon there:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=461

Frankly i think such damage to the road is a lot of fun to drive on + it makes my baby fall asleep
__________________
I want to see some construction!

Last edited by Ingenioren; March 30th, 2011 at 01:52 PM.
Ingenioren no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2011, 02:54 PM   #1294
metasmurf
Registered User
 
metasmurf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Umeå, Sweden
Posts: 374
Likes (Received): 555

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ingenioren View Post
You mean police would use their own common sense to determine when you are driving dangerously, and knick your license?

I don't agree in the previous article that Swedish roads aren't suffering from Telehiv like Norwegian, you can see the exact same phenomenon there:
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=461

Frankly i think such damage to the road is a lot of fun to drive on + it makes my baby fall asleep
There's been several problems with road construction in Sweden during the last 10 years or so. If it's due to sloppy jobs of entrepreneurs, or something else I don't know.

Just to take one example. A shorter stretch of grade separated 2+1 near my town was finished in autumn 2004. In summer 2008, less than 4 years after the opening, the pavement was decomposing and there were big holes. Immediate action was required, and the entire stretch had to be repaved. Why did this happen? The entrepreneur underestimated the cost in the first place and had to choose a cheap kind of pavement.
metasmurf no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2011, 07:04 PM   #1295
KiwiRob
BANNED
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,366
Likes (Received): 5

I think since Norway isn't an EU member they aren't required to put tenders outside of the domestic market.
KiwiRob no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2011, 10:09 PM   #1296
Ingenioren
Registered User
 
Ingenioren's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Oslo
Posts: 5,605
Likes (Received): 584

You're wrong. It's international tender on any contract except very small ones for all public projects - i think the limit is 5 mio nok.
__________________
I want to see some construction!
Ingenioren no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 31st, 2011, 01:41 AM   #1297
JeremyCastle
Registered User
 
JeremyCastle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 169
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by KiwiRob View Post
Jeremy I went through this 5 years ago, the Norwegian insurance companies don't give a crap about your previous driving record, you start from the bottom here and work your way up. Hopefully you have a UK drivers license, if you don't it's going to be expensive changing your US license to a Norwegian one.
Not true... Like I said, two Norwegian insurance companies have already emailed me back and have told me they would accept my previous record with a letter from my insurance company. One will give me the full bonus and another would give me up to 50%. Since I use the same car insurance in the UK and the US, the letter should be easy to get.
JeremyCastle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 31st, 2011, 12:50 PM   #1298
KiwiRob
BANNED
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,366
Likes (Received): 5

Bugger I went through IF, Enter, and a couple of others with no luck, I'm now on a full bonus, but it's still not cheap.
KiwiRob no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 31st, 2011, 01:00 PM   #1299
JeremyCastle
Registered User
 
JeremyCastle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 169
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by KiwiRob View Post
Bugger I went through IF, Enter, and a couple of others with no luck, I'm now on a full bonus, but it's still not cheap.
Just got another reply from Tryg who will accept my record. So now, Codan, IF and Tryg said they would, but Codan said they would only give me as high as 50% bonus. Strange that IF wouldn't accept you, as they will me. Did you have a European insurance record(with licence) or US insurance with license? Gjensidige was the only one of the 4 that said they wouldn't accept my record.

I'm looking at for fully comprehensive coverage, between NOK2700 and NOK 4000 a year which is cheaper than what I pay here in the UK and in the US for 3rd party/liability! So, in addition to frozen salmon at Rema 1000, I just discovered something else that is cheaper in Norway!:-)

Last edited by JeremyCastle; March 31st, 2011 at 01:03 PM. Reason: Added a sentence.
JeremyCastle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 31st, 2011, 10:41 PM   #1300
KiwiRob
BANNED
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,366
Likes (Received): 5

Well since I'm form neither the US or the UK but from NZ I guess my records didn't count. Frozen salmon might be ok if you only want to live on salmon, meat and most everything else is scary expensive, as are any fines to do with driving, I swear they treat speeders with more venon and spite than they would treat you if you killed someone. My neighbour wa fined 4000 NOK last week for driving the wrong way down a one way street, the street is only 10-15m long.
KiwiRob no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
norway

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 04:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium