daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Railways

Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old April 5th, 2013, 10:38 AM   #41
Sopomon
Hideous and malformed
 
Sopomon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 870
Likes (Received): 153

Quote:
Originally Posted by SamuraiBlue View Post
You forgot the Hokuriku Shinkansen, and the Chuo Shinkansen.
They're not built yet
__________________
And he kicked so many rosebushes at her that eventually, Sasuke turned into a log.
Sopomon no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old April 5th, 2013, 01:57 PM   #42
:jax:
Registered User
 
:jax:'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Södertälje
Posts: 1,303
Likes (Received): 540

Are they under construction or just planned?
:jax: no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 5th, 2013, 03:56 PM   #43
China Hand
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 705
Likes (Received): 161

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bannor View Post
Ofcourse the demand is latent in China. We are talking about an economy that may still quadrouple the comming 20-25 years, and with that the transport needs will at least triple.
I am not referring to latent, future middle class growth.

I am referring to people now who would take a CRH but not a regular train, but not fly either. When the CRH opens up, 2nd class is booked full of these middle class families who would not fly and would prefer to not take the old trains. They can afford the old trains now, but want the ZHGT.
China Hand no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 5th, 2013, 05:00 PM   #44
SamuraiBlue
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,232
Likes (Received): 195

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
They're not built yet
Quote:
Originally Posted by :jax: View Post
Are they under construction or just planned?
The Hokuriku Shinkansen Nagano - Kanazawa section is scheduled to open in spring 2015. The Yamanashi test course is going to be incorporated into the Chuo shinkansen.
SamuraiBlue no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 8th, 2013, 03:17 AM   #45
gdolniak
Mememe...
 
gdolniak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 190
Likes (Received): 29

Chinese, HK firms show interest in Malaysian bullet train project

Quote:
Chinese, HK firms show interest in Malaysian bullet train project

Malaysia's Land Public Transport Commission revealed that mainland Chinese and Hong Kong companies have expressed interest in the multi-billion dollar bullet train project that will link Kuala Lumpur with Singapore. Although he did not mention the names of the companies, Mohamad Nur Ismal Kamal, CEO of the commission, said Malaysia has been in talks with Hong Kong rail and property companies as well as with mainland Chinese firms. Tendering for the said project, which is expected to boost industries in the Malaysian cities it passes through, is expected to begin in a year.

http://www.sbrchina.com/mv/news/1362167.html
Anybody has more information about it?
gdolniak no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 8th, 2013, 05:31 AM   #46
big-dog
Registered User
 
big-dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 14,080
Likes (Received): 6840

East Asia - China section updates as of Feb 2013

There are 3 links of Pan Asia Railway with China section, all starting from Kunming, Yunnan Province:

West link: Kunming to Myanmar
Middle link: Kunming to Laos
East link: Kunming to Vietnam


wiki map

Update:

West link: Kunming to Myanmar
  • Kunming-Dalin railway is operational
  • 12/4/2012 Dali-Baoshan-Ruili (Myanmar border) is under construction
    329.379km, Dali-Baoshan section is 75% completed
  • 12/30/2012 Guangtong-Dali double line renovation started
    174.34km, 13.93bln yuan, completes in May 2017
Middle link: Kunming to Laos
  • Kunming-Yuxi railway is operational
  • Yuxi-Mohan (Laos boder) railway is at preparation stage
    504km
East link: Kunming to Vietnam
  • Kunming-Yuxi railway is operational
  • Yuxi-Mengzi railway: 141km, 14 stations, design speed 120km/h, opened on 2/24/2013
  • 1/3/2013 Mengzi-Hekou (Vietnam border) railway tracklaying started
    141km, 6.93 bln yuan, design speed 120km/h, opening in September 2014.
__________________

Highcliff liked this post
big-dog no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 18th, 2013, 04:04 AM   #47
gdolniak
Mememe...
 
gdolniak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 190
Likes (Received): 29

Laos’ Mammoth Train Project a Fast Track to Debt and Despair

Interesting article by Time Magazine about building railway in Laos.

Quote:
Laos’ Mammoth Train Project a Fast Track to Debt and Despair

Change is coming to sleepy Laos in the form of a $7.2 billion railway, set to carve its way through this war-ravaged nation. The costs are to be borne by the Laotian government, courtesy of a Chinese loan amounting to a staggering 86% of Laos’ annual $8.3 billion GDP. The level of indebtedness has led some to condemn the scheme as the latest example of Beijing’s inexorable expansion into Southeast Asia. Aghast economists fear that such exorbitant spending could saddle an already impoverished nation with an insurmountable deficit. Moreover, in Laos’ shadowy police state, where even household-name dissidents are “disappeared” without a murmur of explanation, there are serious doubts on whether ordinary Lao could influence the course of a deal inked by their communist government, however unfavorable it may prove.

Read more: http://world.time.com/2013/04/15/lao...t-and-despair/
gdolniak no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 18th, 2013, 04:14 PM   #48
Sopomon
Hideous and malformed
 
Sopomon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 870
Likes (Received): 153

Quote:
Originally Posted by gdolniak View Post
Interesting article by Time Magazine about building railway in Laos.
That's neo-colonialism for you.
__________________
And he kicked so many rosebushes at her that eventually, Sasuke turned into a log.
Sopomon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2013, 02:57 AM   #49
Silly_Walks
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,978
Likes (Received): 836

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
That's neo-colonialism for you.
What is?
Silly_Walks no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2013, 04:10 AM   #50
Sopomon
Hideous and malformed
 
Sopomon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 870
Likes (Received): 153

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
What is?
What the article I referred to in the quote was discussing.

Laos will be heavily indebted, yet they need the infrastructure. It's quite a common theme in Africa too.
__________________
And he kicked so many rosebushes at her that eventually, Sasuke turned into a log.
Sopomon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 19th, 2013, 09:09 PM   #51
zaphod
PRESIDENT OF SPACE
 
zaphod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,176
Likes (Received): 1677

Aren't there some breaks of gauge on that map? Its not like a train could go from Kunming to Singapore

Too bad. Imagine if everything was standard gauge-a container train could go from France to Vietnam...
__________________
What fun would internet discussions be if we weren't all amateur experts in everything?

After I'm gone, your earth will be free to live out its miserable span of existence, as one of my satellites, and that's how it's going to be...

Bring me the continuum transfunctioner...


bozenBDJ liked this post
zaphod no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 20th, 2013, 02:30 AM   #52
Silly_Walks
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,978
Likes (Received): 836

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
What the article I referred to in the quote was discussing.

Laos will be heavily indebted, yet they need the infrastructure. It's quite a common theme in Africa too.
The West is also heavily indebted and needs its infrastructure... how is that neo-colonialism?
Silly_Walks no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 20th, 2013, 06:45 AM   #53
Ocean Railroader
The Railroad Anomily
 
Ocean Railroader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 158
Likes (Received): 5

What Gauge will this new rail system be?
Ocean Railroader no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 20th, 2013, 02:02 PM   #54
Sopomon
Hideous and malformed
 
Sopomon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 870
Likes (Received): 153

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
The West is also heavily indebted and needs its infrastructure... how is that neo-colonialism?
Because China will be able to lend the money on very one-sided terms to Laos, whereas the European countries wouldn't stand for it, for historical and cultural reasons.

An O/T example: Chin lends money to an african country to build a gold mine. The gold mine will be run by a Chinese firm and most of the money and materials generated will return to China, but the African nation accepts these terms as it is desperate for any kind of investment at all.

European nations are already heavily developed, such terms would be laughed at.
__________________
And he kicked so many rosebushes at her that eventually, Sasuke turned into a log.
Sopomon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 20th, 2013, 03:35 PM   #55
:jax:
Registered User
 
:jax:'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Södertälje
Posts: 1,303
Likes (Received): 540

I would like some collaborating evidence for the Laos contract, and its particulars, but China has had some fairly one-sided contracts in the past. IIRC the original idea went along something that the Chinese would build the railway and finance most of it, but de facto own the railway for a long time to come.

The Chinese interest wouldn't be in poor landlocked Laos, but that Vientiane is more than half the way to Bangkok, and more direct and less politically challenging than a route through Vietnam or Burma. Bangkok would in turn be halfway to Singapore.
:jax: no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 20th, 2013, 04:16 PM   #56
Silly_Walks
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,978
Likes (Received): 836

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
An O/T example: Chin lends money to an african country to build a gold mine. The gold mine will be run by a Chinese firm and most of the money and materials generated will return to China, but the African nation accepts these terms as it is desperate for any kind of investment at all.
Africa is actually a special example. It's not 'the nation' that accepts these terms because they are desperate, it's the ruling elite that accepts these terms because they get a lot of money on their Swiss bank accounts, and don't care at all if their decisions are detrimental to the prosperity of their country as a whole.
Silly_Walks no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 20th, 2013, 09:33 PM   #57
:jax:
Registered User
 
:jax:'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Södertälje
Posts: 1,303
Likes (Received): 540

Quote:
Originally Posted by zaphod View Post
Aren't there some breaks of gauge on that map? Its not like a train could go from Kunming to Singapore

Too bad. Imagine if everything was standard gauge-a container train could go from France to Vietnam...
The new high-speed tracks are supposed to be standard gauge in Thailand and Malaysia, so it is pretty much a given that the new track in Laos would too. France-Vietnam cargo without break of gauge won't happen as Russia is set on using Russian broad gauge.

More importantly I don't know what the plan is for cargo through Laos. For the Chinese network one of the economic arguments for building a separate high-speed network is to release the existing rail network for cargo transport, but Laos doesn't have an existing rail network, and a mixed network for people and cargo negates much of the high-speed benefit. The primary benefit of a rail network should be cargo. The benefit of people transport end-to-end is more slight, around 5 hours Kunming-Bangkok, 10+ hours Kunming-Singapore, hardly competitive with air transport. Cargo and cargo fees is a different story, that could be a handy money for the Laotian economy.

A people link Kunming-Vientiane only links the capital with one minor Laotian city, while on the Thai side they would get a Bangkok-Vientiane link practically for free because it is all Thailand. If tiny Laos were saddled with the bill for a link they wouldn't benefit that much from they really would have gotten a rough deal.
:jax: no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 20th, 2013, 11:02 PM   #58
skyridgeline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,524
Likes (Received): 1216

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
Because China will be able to lend the money on very one-sided terms to Laos, whereas the European countries wouldn't stand for it, for historical and cultural reasons.

An O/T example: Chin lends money to an african country to build a gold mine. The gold mine will be run by a Chinese firm and most of the money and materials generated will return to China, but the African nation accepts these terms as it is desperate for any kind of investment at all.

European nations are already heavily developed, such terms would be laughed at.

National revenues (tax, service fees,etc) and jobs for Africans is a certainty.

I am not sure if the proud Europeans are laughing to the bank though .



Victoria businessman David Black has taken a major step forward in fulfilling his dream of an oil refinery built on B.C.’s west coast after making a deal that could be worth billions of dollars with a major bank in China.

Black’s company, Kitimat Clean, signed a memorandum of understanding Thursday with the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China.

The deal will see the bank act as both financial adviser to the $25-billion project and provide financing for the refinery, pipelines and other elements of the project, which Black said could be in service by 2020.


- Andrew Duffy / Times Colonist April 19, 2013



Canada is pulling ahead of the U.S. in a contest to be the first exporter of liquefied natural gas from the North American shale bonanza to Asia’s $150 billion LNG market.

An LNG terminal being built at a cove north of Vancouver financed by a Houston private-equity firm is scheduled to begin shipping the fuel across the Pacific Ocean in mid-2015, eight months before the first continental U.S. plant is slated to start. Canada’s government has approved twice as much LNG export capacity as its southerly neighbor, evincing a friendlier attitude toward selling domestic gas to the highest bidder and positioning the nation as the go-to source of gas in North America for overseas buyers.


- Joe Carroll & Rebecca Penty - bloomberg.com Apr 3, 2013 12:35 PM MT
skyridgeline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 20th, 2013, 11:21 PM   #59
Sunfuns
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Basel
Posts: 2,426
Likes (Received): 361

What you describe is very different to what is happening in Africa. Canada is a strong state and will get a lot of benefits from the sale of natural gas to China regardless of who is financing building the port infrastructure. I'd be willing to bet that the fine print for deals in Canada and deals in Malawi is very different indeed
Sunfuns no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 21st, 2013, 12:37 AM   #60
foxmulder
Registered User
 
foxmulder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,135
Likes (Received): 382

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
Because China will be able to lend the money on very one-sided terms to Laos, whereas the European countries wouldn't stand for it, for historical and cultural reasons.

An O/T example: Chin lends money to an african country to build a gold mine. The gold mine will be run by a Chinese firm and most of the money and materials generated will return to China, but the African nation accepts these terms as it is desperate for any kind of investment at all.

European nations are already heavily developed, such terms would be laughed at.
What a ton of BS!

You want to learn about effect of China on Africa? Ask Africans. They are very happy about it. You know who is unhappy about China's mining investment in Africa? It is Western mining companies who are very unhappy because China is giving more money with better terms and really investing in beneficial stuff such as infrastructure which exactly what African countries need to develop. China makes natural resources Africa has more valuable.

If China is having such great deals why not US, England or Germany cannot reach those deals

I wonder what type of logic you guys have...

Same thing with Laos. Without China's investment (both money and technology) they cannot have that railroad. If you ask same project to be done by Siemens it will much much more expensive than what China is offering.
__________________

jonasry, Steve27b, Highcliff liked this post
foxmulder no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium