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Old March 2nd, 2007, 08:18 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superchan7 View Post
Politics and pro-Japan sentiment may also be reasons; one more piece of evidence of this is the tendency to hire Japanese architects for major projects.
Taiwan uses the same building code as Japan, so naturally Japanese architects have a competitive advantage over other rivals. Since the codes were adopted during the Chiang era, I think describing it as pro-Japan sentiment is overstating the case.
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Old March 3rd, 2007, 12:07 AM   #22
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I've heard of the problems with the Rotem stock on the Tze-Chiang Hao train...are they planning to augment the fleet for those lines?
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Old March 3rd, 2007, 08:56 AM   #23
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The TRA are in the process of conducting a open tender for an additional 316 cars. The new EMU "800", maximum speed of 130/kph, will be introduced on the western trunk line in 2009.

Companies that have expressed an interest in bidding for the EMU 800 contract include; Rotem, Hitachi, and TRSC/Nippon Sharyo.

Last edited by tr; March 7th, 2007 at 01:42 PM.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 02:50 PM   #24
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EMU 800


Japan-Taiwan joint venture wins order for 296 train cars in Taiwan
Sunday 16th January, 03:51 AM JST

NAGOYA — Japanese rail car manufacturer Nippon Sharyo Ltd and trading house Sumitomo Corp said that a Taiwanese train car maker they have jointly set up with local partners has won an order for 296 commuter train cars from the Taiwan Railways Administration.

Under the 44 billion yen deal, the joint venture Taiwan Rolling Stock Co, which was set up in 2002, plans to deliver the cars from 2012 through 2015, the Japanese firms said.

The low-floor train cars will run in Taipei’s suburban areas and on lines connecting between major cities in Taiwan at a speed of up to 130 kilometers per hour.


New Taidong Express


Sumitomo and Nippon Sharyo wins train sets supply deal in Taiwan

Monday, 10 Jan 2011, Japanese suppliers Sumitomo Corporation and Nippon Sharyo confirmed on January 6th 2011 that they had signed a TWD 10.6 billion contract to supply Taiwan Railway Administration with 17 inter city tilting train sets (136 rail cars) capable of operation at 150 kilometers per hour.

Under the deal agreed on December 31st 2010, the eight car EMUs are due to be delivered in 2012-14 for use on Taroko Express services between Taipei and Hualien on TRA's 1.067 mm gauge east coast route. The aluminium bodied trains will feature wheelchair access, luggage and bicycle spaces and onboard vending machines.

The east coast line was electrified at 25 kV 60 Hz in 2003, and TRA introduced its first tilting trains in April 2007, helping to shorten journey times and making rail more competitive with the island's improved roads.

TRA acquired an initial build of six 8 car tilting train sets from Marubeni and Hitachi to launch the Taroko Express services. The railway had planned to exercise an option for a further 48 vehicles in 2009, but called new tenders after it failed to agree terms with the suppliers because of changing exchange rates. Three rounds of bidding were held in the new competition, but most bidders were reportedly unable to meet TRA's requirements in terms of price and delivery schedule.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 03:13 PM   #25
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Thanks for updating this thread tr. I was wondering where it was. Taiwan's railways need to be showcased more here.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 03:24 PM   #26
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Updated the thread title to fit with the others. All non HSR topics can now be put in here for Taiwan.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 03:49 PM   #27
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The EMU800 render looks impressive. They don't look like commuter trains though, more like an inter city express.

Last edited by nemu; January 16th, 2011 at 03:56 PM.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 05:17 PM   #28
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沙崙線 Shalun Line, Tainan TRA - Tainan HSR
Train: Rotem, EMU600


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Old November 12th, 2011, 12:24 PM   #29
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Hsinchu - Jhubei (Liujia) [六家] is completed.

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Old November 16th, 2011, 05:14 PM   #30
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Love it!
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Old January 18th, 2012, 05:17 PM   #31
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Ouch.

Taroko Express crash kills 1, injures 26

A speeding Taroko Express train yesterday rammed into the rear of a heavy-duty gravel truck in northern Taiwan, killing the train driver and leaving 26 injured, none critically.
The truck driver, who is being blamed for the crash, managed to narrowly escape certain death by jumping off the truck before the impact. Police yesterday interviewed the truck driver, a man identified by his surname Peng, after his brief, mysterious “disappearance” from the scene, and may charge him with negligent manslaughter.

The train, with 250 passengers on board, was heading north at 8:42 a.m., when it hit the truck at a crossing on Yangmei's Yongmei Road. It kept going after the impact, pushing the damaged truck along for 300 meters, until it reached the Puxin Railway Station in downtown Yangmei.

The Puxin Railway Station was immediately shut down, and south- and north-bound trains could go no further south than the Zhongli Railway Station in the north and no further north than the Yangmei Railroad Station south of the Puxin Railway Station, respectively. As train service was disrupted, long backups were reported on the major highways and roads nearby. As of press time, emergency crews were still combing the scene of the accident and resumption of normal train service was not expected until this morning.

According to Taiwan Railway Administration (TRA, 臺灣鐵路管理局), the train's locomotive was completely destroyed and a section of railroad and a rail switch were damaged. The truck was also totaled.

Security cameras show the gravel truck driven by Peng entered the level crossing immediately after another truck, without keeping a safe distance. When the driver of the first truck stepped on the brake after clearing the tracks, Peng also braked to avoid a rear-end collision and got caught on the tracks.

Tsai, the train driver killed in the crash, was the father of an only son, graduated third from his class at the TRA Training Center and has been a fine train driver twice honored for this meritorious performance since he officially joined TRA in 1988. He had been asked to help train a number of female rookies before his untimely death.

With one Taroko locomotive gone, the TRA will have to rely on the remaining five to transport passengers on the 86.6-km North-Link Line, in the central section of the Eastern Line of the TRA, including the 7.4-km segment between Beipu in Hsinchu and Hualien Port, during the Chinese New Year holidays. A slower PP Ziqiang locomotive will be used as a stopgap.

Shortly after the accident, the TRA reassured people who have reserved tickets for service on the North-Link Line during the Chinese New Year Holidays will not be affected, while cautioning them to expect an up-to-30-minute increase in travel time.

The TRA loss is estimated at NT$200 million, according to officials.



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Old January 19th, 2012, 07:05 AM   #32
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Wow what kind of a idiot who doesn't make sure there are enough clearance before crossing train tracks. Miraculously no body on the platform was killed, the way the truck was pushed through the station is crazy.
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Old January 20th, 2012, 04:24 AM   #33
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Is this grade crossing protected by gates? It's hard to tell from the close-circuit video sample. Also, are there some kind of optical obstruction sensors installed at grade crossings? It may have at least warned the driver of the train a few seconds earlier, and gave him time to at least brake a few seconds faster. Also, was this a through train or was it going to stop at the station? Is the stretch of track a straight line, or is there a curve before the grade crossing that prevents the train driver from seeing the condition ahead?
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Old January 20th, 2012, 07:11 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
Is this grade crossing protected by gates? It's hard to tell from the close-circuit video sample. Also, are there some kind of optical obstruction sensors installed at grade crossings? It may have at least warned the driver of the train a few seconds earlier, and gave him time to at least brake a few seconds faster. Also, was this a through train or was it going to stop at the station? Is the stretch of track a straight line, or is there a curve before the grade crossing that prevents the train driver from seeing the condition ahead?
This is the Google Earth coordinates of the crash site:

24°55'01.58" N 121°10'52.11" E



The crossing is gate-protected, like all of Taiwan's RR crossings. The truck simply followed the truck before it and stopped on the tracks when the truck before it stopped for a red light. The collision happened only twenty seconds after the truck had stopped, and as you can see, there IS a curve. The Taroko is Taiwan's only tilting train in service, with only six trainsets in service (now five). It can negotiate curves at speeds of 130 km/h. Since Puxin is a small station, it can naturally be assumed that the train was not stopping at the station.

Ouch.
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Old January 20th, 2012, 07:38 AM   #35
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This brings up an interesting point:
Should we eliminate at-grade crossings?
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Old January 20th, 2012, 09:56 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
This brings up an interesting point:
Should we eliminate at-grade crossings?
I think it depends on the level of urbanization along the tracks. If a road frequently experiences traffic jams because of the trains, and if the costs are deemed worthwhile, then yes, the grades should be separated. Taipei has already done that over a decade back, and some other cities want to as well, but again, the costs are prohibitively expensive.

As for this incident, I don't think Puxin even counts as urban, and I don't think that Taiwan should pour millions of NT just to avoid car-train collisions. The crossings are already a lot safer than that of the US'.
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Old January 20th, 2012, 10:26 AM   #37
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Quote:
The crossing is gate-protected, like all of Taiwan's RR crossings. The truck simply followed the truck before it and stopped on the tracks when the truck before it stopped for a red light. The collision happened only twenty seconds after the truck had stopped, and as you can see, there IS a curve. The Taroko is Taiwan's only tilting train in service, with only six trainsets in service (now five). It can negotiate curves at speeds of 130 km/h. Since Puxin is a small station, it can naturally be assumed that the train was not stopping at the station.
Seems like a combination of factors led to this accident, though ultimately it was the truck drivers fault for following too closely. I see the grade crossing serves a cement (?) plant (private crossing), rather than being part of a public through road. Perhaps the cement company in cooperation with TRA needs to institute a more strict protocol for vehicle traffic using this crossing, such as adding a human crossing guard, or resetting the grade crossing timing so that it activates sooner for an oncoming train.
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Old January 20th, 2012, 06:58 PM   #38
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This is a very close call because there are numerous houses right next to the track too, if the train derailed slightly farther the cars can destroy a lot of houses. Trains going through stations at speed is awesome to watch, but quite scary too.
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Old January 22nd, 2012, 09:04 AM   #39
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Was the truck empty?

I can see the train being heavily damaged if the truck was full of a few dozen tons of dirt, but without anything?
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Old January 22nd, 2012, 09:58 AM   #40
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Judging from this picture the truck is empty.



However the train's nose is heavily damaged resulting in the driver's death.


Pics from China Post.
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