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Old January 23rd, 2012, 04:04 PM   #41
Silver Swordsman
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Empty or full, the truck was made to carry heavy loads, thus having a very strong and sturdy chassis. Second of all, Taiwan's trains, unlike American trains, are not designed to meet FRA specifications (weight), and instead of being heavy, are designed to be light. This is the biggest issue that concerns the California High Speed Rail, the issue of whether 220 mph high speed trains, designs which are imported from overseas, will be allowed to run on US-regulated systems.
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Old January 23rd, 2012, 06:37 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Swordsman View Post
Empty or full, the truck was made to carry heavy loads, thus having a very strong and sturdy chassis. Second of all, Taiwan's trains, unlike American trains, are not designed to meet FRA specifications (weight), and instead of being heavy, are designed to be light. This is the biggest issue that concerns the California High Speed Rail, the issue of whether 220 mph high speed trains, designs which are imported from overseas, will be allowed to run on US-regulated systems.
If it is completely grade separated combined with a modern security system, the US could have new, specialized regulations for HSR.
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Old January 23rd, 2012, 08:24 PM   #43
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For a light tilting training hitting the truck at such a high rate of speed I'd say the train fared well, no passengers were killed.
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Old January 24th, 2012, 06:55 PM   #44
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台湾现在就像是一个延伸的JR
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Old January 24th, 2012, 06:56 PM   #45
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台湾现在就像是一个延伸的JR
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Old February 11th, 2012, 07:08 AM   #46
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Sat, Feb 11, 2012
TRA converts old rail spikes into souvenirs
MEMORIES OF YORE: The disused iron spikes will come packed in a glass bottle with a handbag that has an image of oil lamps previously used by the TRA
Taipei Times

While some may regard rail spikes as ugly and useless, the Taiwan Railways Administration (TRA) has managed to turn them into exquisite gifts, scheduled to hit the market on Valentine’s Day next week.

The TRA said that the rail spikes were used to fasten railway tracks, which were previously built on wooden railroad ties. At present, almost all of the spikes have been replaced with steel fastening devices because most of the railway tracks are now built on concrete ties.

TRA said that the spikes are made of iron and can be referred to as tieding (鐵釘) in Chinese, which literally translates as “iron tacks.”

In Chinese, the pronunciation for iron tacks is similar to that for the phrase describing something that is destined to happen, which is also tieding (鐵定). The difference is that the ding (釘) in the former is pronounced in the first tone, whereas the ding (定) in the latter is pronounced in the fourth tone.

The TRA said the rail spikes to be sold were previously used on the railway tracks at Keelung Railway Station, which is a terminus of the TRA’s Western Line.

The operator said the souvenir spikes had to undergo rustproof treatment. They were then placed in glass bottles, which are designed in the shape of a small iceberg. The handbag designed to hold the bottle has an image of oil lamps used by the TRA in the past. Aside from the rail spikes and glass bottles, the handbag also contains two unfilled job application forms, both in English and in Chinese.

The TRA said it hopes that whoever receives such a gift is destined to succeed, that they could break through the ice and reach the peak.

The TRA said that only 3,000 are available at the Taipei, Songshan (松山), Taichung and Kaohsiung railway stations, with each set costing NT$1,499.
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Old February 23rd, 2012, 04:59 AM   #47
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Tue, Feb 21, 2012
Taipei Times
Twenty-thousand railway commuters are delayed
TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES:Some passengers were forced to wait as long as 93 minutes. Meanwhile, railways announced that passengers could recharge their cellphones at stations

More than 20,000 railway commuters yesterday were delayed after electric cables on two different sections of railway line broke.

The Taiwan Railway Administration (TRA) said the incident occurred between Sijhih (汐止) and Nangang (南港) at 8:05am and between Jiaosi (礁溪) and Sicheng (四城) at 8:20am.

A preliminary investigation showed that the first disruption was caused by broken electricity contact strips, which led to the malfunctioning of the electric cables.

The second was caused by a rail pantograph falling from a Tzuchiang express operating at the section, which snapped the electric cables for about 2km.

Further investigations will be conducted by the railway service’s operational safety committee, the TRA said.

Thirteen trains were delayed for more than 45 minutes, long enough for passengers on the trains to be entitled to a full refund from the TRA.

The two worst cases were two Shulin (樹林)-Hualien express trains — No. 206 and No. 74, which were delayed for 93 and 82 minutes respectively.

The TRA said that two-way -operations on the Jiaosi-Sicheng section had resumed using one railway line at 9:34am. Full service on the section was scheduled to resume at 8pm yesterday.

Operation of the Sijhih--Nangang section returned to normal at 10:27am.

The TRA said the express train that caused the damage along the -Jiaosi-Sicheng section was towed to the Yilan Train Station, with 350 passengers on board, who were transferred to another train to Hualien later.

In related news, both the high speed rail stations and those operated by the TRA have been equipped with electricity sockets for passengers who need to recharge their mobile phone batteries, the railway systems said.

Media reported recently that a man was arrested on suspicion of stealing electricity from the Taipei MRT system when he tried to charge his mobile phone at the Danshui station.

However, the scenario is not likely to occur with the high-speed rail and TRA systems.

The high-speed rail has mobile phone-charging areas in each station, with both regular and USB sockets available for use. Its business-class train carriages are equipped with sockets as well, which passengers from economy-class carriages can also use with the assistance of train staff.

The TRA has mobile phone charging areas in its Banciao (板橋), Songshan, Taichung, Kaohsiung, Yilan and Taitung stations. Passengers can also ask for assistance from TRA staff when they are in other stations, or when they are aboard the trains.
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Old February 27th, 2012, 07:15 PM   #48
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Tue, Feb 28, 2012
Hsinchu station facilitates train timetable downloads
Taipei Times

The Taiwan Railway Administration’s (TRA) Hsinchu station has launched a service that allows passengers to download train timetables to their smartphones using Quick Response (QR) technology.

Station master Huang Rong-hua (黃榮華) said that Hsinchu station is the first to offer passengers the service.

“Passengers can look at the train timetable displayed at Hsinchu station, but they might forget the boarding time,” Huang said. “Or they might write down the time on a piece of paper and lose it.”

The station displays the QR codes next to the train timetable and a map of the Neiwan (內灣) and Liuchia (六家) railway branch lines, Huang said.

Passengers can use smartphones equipped with a QR code scanning app to scan the codes, which then displays a link to Hsinchu station’s Web site, providing all the information needed.

Hsinchu train station has been in use since 1913. To allow visitors to explore the building, the station has designed a self-guided walking tour titled “Hsinchu Story House.”

An introduction to Hsinchu railway station and information on tourist attractions in Hsinchu County can be obtained by scanning the QR codes for that information displayed at the station.

In the three months since it was launched, the service has had more than 5,000 users, Huang said, adding that fewer passengers now ask for a hard copy of the train timetable.

“They [passengers] can forget a copy of the train timetable, but they are unlikely to forget their mobile phones,” Huang said.

Last year, Taiwan High Speed Rail Corp (THSRC) incorporated QR technology into its mobile ticket-booking application, allowing passengers to pass through ticket gates using their mobile phone.

Passengers obtain QR codes after booking train tickets with their mobile phone. They can then access the platforms after having the QR code scanned.
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Old February 27th, 2012, 08:35 PM   #49
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просрали железную дорогу в россии. Как и многое. Завидую я иностранцам
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Old February 28th, 2012, 07:15 PM   #50
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Something out of the ordinary on Taiwan's trains :

Tuesday, February 28, 2012 0:07 am TWN
China Post
Police take organizer of train 'sex party' into custody

The man suspected of organizing a sex party on a moving train a week ago was arrested yesterday afternoon on charges of violating public order and decency laws and regulations, according to police sources.

The suspect, surnamed Tsai, was in custody at the police station, but remained silent when asked by reporters to say something about the sex party, in which a young lady allegedly had sex with 18 men in a locked train carriage during an 80-minute ride from Taipei to Zhunan in Miaoli County on the afternoon of Feb. 19.

Tsai was originally slated to show up at a police office on Sunday to elaborate on the alleged sex party, but failed to do so. Instead, Tsai held a secret meeting with six participants of the alleged party, apparently seeking to collude in coordinating their confessions to the police.

Accordingly, the police moved to arrest Tsai yesterday afternoon on charges of undermining public morality by orchestrating the “ridiculous” sex party.

The police will determine whether Tsai should face criminal charges for organizing such a party, and will also check to see if Tsai and other members have attempted to collude.

On Sunday afternoon, Tsai reportedly met the six members at a parking lot near Ximending, and told them that he would reveal the whole story to the police.

After sighting news photographers, Tsai and the six members dispersed, and then two members turned themselves in to the police, confessing that they did have sex with the young lady in a “harmonious atmosphere.”

In related news, a participant in the alleged sex party told the Chinese-language Apple Daily that all the male participants, were wearing suits and were asked to pay NT$800 to be admitted into the party inside the Juguang train carriage at around 3:20 p.m. on Feb. 19. Some 10 minutes later, two female assistants distributed condoms and mouthwash to them.

When a woman, 170 centimeters tall and weighing 50 kilograms, showed up in the train carriage, the male members were at loss for what to do. Then Tsai took the initiative to show them how to flirt with her, causing other members to follow suit. As a result, the woman had sex with all 18 men who paid the admission fee before the train reached Zhunan Station after an 80-minute ride.

The scandal was exposed after a legislator of the opposition Democratic Progressive Party alleged on Thursday that 18 men rented a train carriage and had a sex party with a single young woman.
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Old February 29th, 2012, 08:21 AM   #51
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^What the **** did I just read??? Still... very interesting. Might be a bit inappropriate for younger members here.
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Old February 29th, 2012, 08:59 AM   #52
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Since they rented the whole carriage and it was locked and out of sight for public, I think it was not a public place anymore therefore I don't think they violated any public order. And "undermining public morality" just sounds completely out of touch with reality in Taiwan We wouldn't know anything if not leaks to the media. Every day there are hundreds sex parties in Taipei alone, in KTVs, hotels, spas, saunas, private homes etc. Why not in the train?
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Old February 29th, 2012, 09:05 AM   #53
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True - by their logic, I would've thought the likes of Apple Daily would have been shut down long ago!
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Old March 1st, 2012, 10:15 AM   #54
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Wed, Feb 29, 2012
Taiwan, Japan to launch rail diplomacy campaign
‘SISTER TRAINS’:Two of the oldest locomotives in Taiwan and Japan, steam trains that ply tourist areas in Hokkaido and Taiwan’s mountains, will be involved
Taipei Times with CNA



The C11-171 steam locomotive hauls the Fuyu-no-Shitsugen train along snowy tracks in Hokkaido, Japan, in an undated photograph provided by the Taiwan Railways Administration
Photo: CNA, courtesy of the Taiwan Railways Administration


Taiwan and Japan plan to launch a joint rail tourism campaign next month as part of expanding links between the two countries since a massive earthquake struck Japan in March last year.

In the campaign, dubbed “sister trains,” Taiwan’s CK124 steam engine and a similar Japanese train called the Hokkaido SL Fuyu-no-Shitsugen will be used to promote railway travel in both countries, authorities said.

The partnership idea came about during a visit to Taiwan by Japanese officials in April last year to promote tourism as part of Japan’s disaster recovery efforts.

After months of discussions and with the help of non-profit organizations, a promotional campaign was devised featuring a plan called “Train Travel: Winter in Hokkaido and summer in Taiwan.”

It is to be formalized on March 12 in a letter of intent signed by the Japan Hokkaido Railway Co (JR Hokkaido) and the Taiwan Railways Administration (TRA).

“It is the first time that Taiwan has entered into such a partnership with a foreign rail company,” said Wang Chuan-hsin (王川信), the TRA division chief in charge of the project.

JR Hokkaido said the promotional campaign is expected to help revive the economy in northeast Japan, an area that was hit hard by the powerful earthquake and ensuing tsunami on March 11 last year.

The partnership is also a means to express Japan’s gratitude for Taiwan’s tremendous humanitarian aid in the wake of the disaster, JR Hokkaido said.

For Taiwan, the project also offers an opportunity to enhance cultural preservation, according to the Society of Railway and National Planning, which has been involved in the partnership.

“We hope Taiwan can take this opportunity to learn from Japan’s ways of preserving invaluable cultural heritage like these locomotives,” said Jen Hen-yi, a spokesman for the society.

Although the full details of the promotional campaign have not been finalized, the TRA said, it plans to invite its Japanese counterpart to take part in Taiwan’s Railway Festival in June.

The CK124, built in 1936, is one of Taiwan’s most popular steam locomotives and is widely used by the TRA for promotional purposes.

In Japan, the C11-171 engine that pulls the SL Fuyu-no--Shitsugen Train was manufactured in 1940 and operated in various parts of Hokkaido.
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Old March 10th, 2012, 04:38 PM   #55
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By sunny yang from a Chinese photography forum :

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Old March 12th, 2012, 06:53 PM   #56
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Mon, Mar 12, 2012
TRA to spend NT$30m installing new ticket machines
Taipei Times

The Taiwan Railway Administration (TRA) recently announced that it would spend NT$30 million (US$1 million) this year installing new automatic ticket machines at a handful of railway stations, adding that the new system would allow passengers to choose window or aisle seats.

At present, the administration has automatic ticket machines in 148 stations nationwide. On average, 18,000 passengers purchase tickets using the machines every day. However, they accept only coins and NT$100 bills, and passengers cannot use them to return tickets.

Peng Kun-yen (彭昆炎), chief of the administration’s operations section, said the new ticket machines would allow passengers to pay with a credit card.

In addition to NT$100 bills, Peng said the new machines would also accept NT$500, NT$1,000 and NT$2,000 notes.

Change can be returned in coins or in bills, he said.

“When purchasing tickets using the new machines, passengers can choose if they want a window or aisle seat,” Peng said. “They can also use the new machines to return their tickets or transfer to a different train.”

The administration said it initially planned to replace the ticket machines in Taipei, Greater Tai-chung, Greater Kaohsiung, Hualien, Taitung and other main train stations, adding that it would gradually replace all ticket machines nationwide.

In related news, the administration said passengers can now charge their mobile phones at 24 train stations nationwide.

Previously, the free service was available only at Songshan, Banciao, Taichung, Yilan and Taitung stations. The service will now be made available at Keelung, Chidu (七堵), Nangang, Taipei, Shulin (樹林), Taoyuan, Jhungli (中壢), Hsinchu, Chunan (竹南), Miaoli (苗栗), Fongyuan (豐原), Changhua, Yuanlin (員林), Chiayi, Tainan, Kao-hsiung, Xinzuoying (新左營), Luodong (羅東) and Hualien stations.

Passengers can also ask staff for assistance at other stations or aboard trains.

The administration decided to expand the availability of the free phone-charging service after recent media reports that a man was arrested on suspicion of stealing electricity from the Taipei MRT system when he tried to charge his mobile phone at the Tamshui station.

The incident also caused Taipei Mayor Hau Lung-bin (郝龍斌) to ask Taipei Rapid Transit Corp to research the possibility of allowing customers to charge their mobile phones at several key MRT stations.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 01:42 PM   #57
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Old March 20th, 2012, 07:47 PM   #58
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Wed, Mar 21, 2012
Taipei Times
Train sex party host, five others charged

Banciao prosecutors yesterday indicted a man who hired a Taiwan Railways Administration (TRA) carriage to hold a sex party.

Tsai Yu-lin (蔡育林), who organized the controversial party, was charged with sexual offenses and prosecutors requested a six-month prison sentence.

Three male assistants who are suspected of maintaining order in the carriage during the sex party and two female assistants, who stood by and provided condoms and towels, were also indicted on the same charges, and prosecutors requested two-month prison sentences.

Eighteen male participants — some of whom are suspected of performing sexual acts with a 17-year-old female, while others touched her body, were not indicted because there was no evidence that they knew she was under the age of 18, prosecutors said.

The Chinese-language Apple Daily reported that Democratic Progressive Party Legislator Yeh Yi-jin (葉宜津) had received a complaint about an online article saying that a group of 25 people had used a TRA carriage to hold a sex party on Feb. 19.

The report also said that the party organizer required all the men to dress in a suit and tie, and the women to wear formal office attire. Once aboard, the organizer allowed the men to perform sexual acts with a young woman.

The report said the 18 participants paid NT$800 each to attend the party.

Prosecutors launched an investigation after the incident was revealed. All 25 people involved were questioned.

Prosecutors said the carriage was part of a Chukuang-class train that ran from Cidu District (七堵), Keelung to Greater Kaohsiung on Feb. 19. The passengers boarded the train in Taipei at 3:25pm and disembarked in Jhunan (竹南), Hsinchu County, at 5:15pm.
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Old March 22nd, 2012, 05:29 PM   #59
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Thu, Mar 22, 2012
TRA station receives arrears, note
Taipei Times

The Pingtung Railway Station recently received thousands of New Taiwan dollars and a letter of remorse from a former commuter who evaded paying fares for a month many years ago, the stationmaster said on Tuesday.

The commuter, who used to travel from Greater Kaohsiung to Pingtung, sent NT$6,000 and a note, saying he was sorry for not paying fares for a month by buying tickets with tokens and by exploiting loopholes in railway regulations, stationmaster Tang Ching-yuan (唐慶元) said.

“I was young and ignorant at the time, with little sense of right and wrong. I used to commute between Kaohsiung and Pingtung, but for about one month, I purchased tickets using tokens and used loopholes to evade paying fares. I’m deeply ashamed of my poor behavior and would like to provide compensation for my misconduct with NT$5,000,” the note said, despite actually giving NT$6,000.

Station staff said that the sender could have commuted between the two stations by local train, with a one-way ticket priced at NT$31, a return ticket for NT$59, and an even lower price of NT$1,107 for a monthly pass.

Therefore, the man overpaid by NT$4,893, which the staff assumed was his way of paying back years of interest from his “outstanding debts.”

The case was reported to the Taiwan Railways Administration (TRA), with the belated fares paid to the treasury, the stationmaster said.
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Old June 29th, 2012, 09:26 AM   #60
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Fri, June 29, 2012
TRA unveils new tilting train car for Eastern Line
Taipei Times
Shelly Shan


Image: Taiwan Railway

The Taiwan Railway Administration (TRA) yesterday unveiled its new tilting train car, which will be used to enhance transportation capacity on the Eastern Line.

The nation’s largest railway service has purchased 136 tilting train cars from Japan. The first order of 16 cars is scheduled to arrive in October, with the remaining train cars scheduled to arrive by the end of next year.
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiw.../29/2003536542
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