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Old February 17th, 2011, 11:00 PM   #181
ChrisZwolle
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I made that word up. In the last 15 years, a new approach has entered the Netherlands in terms of traffic safety. Despite the country being one of the safest in Europe for decades, they took more drastic steps. Nearly 90% of all rural road speed limits were lowered from 80 to 60 km/h, except for most numbered N-roads which remained 80 km/h. Besides that, thousands of the lowest design standard (R=18) roundabouts have been constructed along N-roads, plus city limits have expanded, a more aggressive traffic calming has been implemented and completely ridiculous passing bans have been put into place. Lots of 100 km/h roads were also downgraded to 80 km/h. The only way Dutch N-roads are going is down. Road widths are reduced, main non-urban roads have lane widths of only 2.75 m, meaning trucks have less than 10 cm on each side to maneuver. Shoulders are removed, as are many SOS bays. The road markings have been changed to make it visually less attractive to drive fast. Sometimes side markings are over 1 m from the side to optically reduce road width (you cannot pass each other within the road markings!)

Here's a visualization; a rural road, downgraded from 80 to 60 km/h, road markings further from the edge, road width reduced and replaced by rumble strips. But why? There is a separate two-way bicycle facility.

Last edited by ChrisZwolle; February 17th, 2011 at 11:06 PM.
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Old February 17th, 2011, 11:02 PM   #182
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabri88 View Post
In Italy we have solid white lines at the side of the road and a broken white line in the middle.

Solid line in the middle means "overtaking forbidden" and "U-turn forbidden". Sometimes this line is double to strenghten the meaning.

In the middle of some roads you can find a mix of one solid and one broken line. This means that overtaking is allowed only to cars that are in the side in which there is broken line!
Some what similar to USA road l lines except we have two yellow solid lines and/or one side solid and one side broken where over take is allowed.
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Old February 17th, 2011, 11:17 PM   #183
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Thank you for the answer Chris.

I want to correct myself: solid middle line doesn't mean that overtaking is forbidden, but only that you can not cross that line.

For example: if you have the space and you have a little car driving slowly in front of you, you can overtake it but you can't pass the solid line.

If overtaking is forbidden there will be a plate on your side of the road.
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Old February 18th, 2011, 12:16 AM   #184
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Canada:

Double solid: Overtaking forbidden.
Single solid: In rural ares: Pass with care. In urban areas, I think it means no overtaking.
Single solid with broken line on one side: Overtaking permitted on side with broken line. Oncoming traffic may NOT overtake.
Broken line: Overtaking in either direction permitted.
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Old February 18th, 2011, 10:21 PM   #185
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fargo Wolf View Post
Canada:

Double solid: Overtaking forbidden.
Single solid: In rural ares: Pass with care. In urban areas, I think it means no overtaking.
Single solid with broken line on one side: Overtaking permitted on side with broken line. Oncoming traffic may NOT overtake.
Broken line: Overtaking in either direction permitted.
Passing is not allowed only when there are signs that state no passing, atleast that is the rule in Ontario. The lines are only suggestions.
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Old February 19th, 2011, 04:37 PM   #186
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The UK uses double-yellow lines extensively at the side for parking restrictions. Although it makes it quite clear where you cannot park, I've always felt they make UK roads look a bit scruffy, to be honest.


Last edited by Gareth; February 20th, 2011 at 08:29 PM.
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Old February 19th, 2011, 08:26 PM   #187
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Quote:
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Passing is not allowed only when there are signs that state no passing, atleast that is the rule in Ontario. The lines are only suggestions.
Here's what I was able to find online. You'll have to scroll down to get to the pavement marking section.

http://www.icbc.com/driver-licensing...d/drivers3.pdf
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Old February 20th, 2011, 06:14 AM   #188
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The UK uses double-yellow lines extensively at the side for parking restricitons. Although it makes it quite clear where you cannot park. I've always felt they make UK roads look a bit scruffy, to be honest.

We will occasionally paint the curb yellow for that.
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Old February 20th, 2011, 08:32 PM   #189
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Painted kerbs are even more scruffy.

I do like the thinner variant of yellow lines we have in the UK for conservation areas. Not only are they thinner, the yellow is much milder. I'd rather these wre standard, to be honest.
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Old February 20th, 2011, 11:17 PM   #190
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I must agree that lines or curb markings that signify parking restriction are much clearer than signs. The parking signs in Ontario (and I presume in the rest of Canada and the US) are often extremely confusing, because it's often not clear what side of the road they apply to, what side of the sign, etc. You always have to hunt for one if you don't happen to see any signs in the immediate vicinity.
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Old February 21st, 2011, 12:23 AM   #191
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I also like painted lines better than signs but...
-Road markings don't last very long in our climate.
-Painted lines are pretty much useless if they're covered by snow for 3 months a year.
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Old February 21st, 2011, 12:48 AM   #192
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True. Snow does obscure road markings. Really, both signs & markings should be applied, to cover all bases.
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Old February 21st, 2011, 01:50 PM   #193
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A question for those countries that use yellow lines:
As we know in countries with white central divider lines like here in Greece, when the road its not completed, or in that section they do some works on the road, usually they use the yellow line to indicate the problem or that the road its not completed. In the countries that they use the yellow lines, examble U.S., Brazil etc in what signs or colours use to indicate the problem or that the section/road is uncompleted, under construction etc? I talking about the plain roads with 1 lane in each direction.
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Old February 21st, 2011, 06:20 PM   #194
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Quote:
Originally Posted by christos-greece View Post
A question for those countries that use yellow lines:
As we know in countries with white central divider lines like here in Greece, when the road its not completed, or in that section they do some works on the road, usually they use the yellow line to indicate the problem or that the road its not completed. In the countries that they use the yellow lines, examble U.S., Brazil etc in what signs or colours use to indicate the problem or that the section/road is uncompleted, under construction etc? I talking about the plain roads with 1 lane in each direction.
In the US they use big orange signs, orange and white reflective barrels in construction zones. Sometimes they will line the construction area divider lines with solid yellow or white reflectors.
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Old February 21st, 2011, 07:27 PM   #195
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScraperDude View Post
In the US they use big orange signs, orange and white reflective barrels in construction zones. Sometimes they will line the construction area divider lines with solid yellow or white reflectors.
It's pretty much the same in Canada. Major projects are well signed with orange construction signs and, on major works variable message boards. If pavement markings are removed on arterial routes, sometimes reflective tape is used. As am currently employed in setting up and taking down roadworks signage, I can show you the manual that is used in the Province of British Columbia, Canada (PDF files):

http://www.th.gov.bc.ca/publications...rol_Manual.htm
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Old February 21st, 2011, 10:32 PM   #196
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We use the same white and yellow markings trough construction-zone. Only difference is speed-limit and warning signs are yellow.
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Old February 21st, 2011, 11:02 PM   #197
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I find it entirely confusing when other countries don't use yellow to divide opposing traffic. Often I see dashed white lines to mark lanes and then a solid or dashed white line to mark opposing traffic. Huh?! How is this not confusing for people?
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Old February 22nd, 2011, 03:40 AM   #198
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fargo Wolf View Post
It's pretty much the same in Canada. Major projects are well signed with orange construction signs and, on major works variable message boards. If pavement markings are removed on arterial routes, sometimes reflective tape is used. As am currently employed in setting up and taking down roadworks signage, I can show you the manual that is used in the Province of British Columbia, Canada (PDF files):

http://www.th.gov.bc.ca/publications...rol_Manual.htm
I was just in Toronto this weekend, drove up from Ohio and hit a few construction zones on the QEW. I'm not a fan of the orange/black stripe construction barrels. I find them harder to see at night.
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Old February 22nd, 2011, 04:31 AM   #199
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Quote:
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I was just in Toronto this weekend, drove up from Ohio and hit a few construction zones on the QEW. I'm not a fan of the orange/black stripe construction barrels. I find them harder to see at night.
Those are kinda dark. Quebec has bright barrels which I like. They are reflective white, with reflective fluorescent orange stripes.
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Old February 24th, 2011, 10:32 PM   #200
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northsider View Post
I find it entirely confusing when other countries don't use yellow to divide opposing traffic. Often I see dashed white lines to mark lanes and then a solid or dashed white line to mark opposing traffic. Huh?! How is this not confusing for people?
If you live with it, you get used to it. Generally, the centre lines and the lane dividing lines look a bit different, but sometimes this is not a case, for example a road in Staines, UK, has a section like this;

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