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Old January 9th, 2010, 11:35 PM   #81
Alqaszar
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I noticed that all American nations use more or less yellow dividing markers (i. e. it looks always like in the USA). Maybe some Carribean nations (former British colonies, as well as French and British posessions) use only white, but more or less the "American" standard should be yellow dividing line with double stripe when overtaking is not allowed.
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Old January 10th, 2010, 04:25 AM   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alqaszar View Post
I noticed that all American nations use more or less yellow dividing markers (i. e. it looks always like in the USA). Maybe some Carribean nations (former British colonies, as well as French and British posessions) use only white, but more or less the "American" standard should be yellow dividing line with double stripe when overtaking is not allowed.
Yup, yellow lines are in the center of two-way roads and on the left shoulder of divided highways and, or so I hear, one-way roads. (I've yet to see a one-way road with edge lines - the only ones I see are urban ones with a curb and no edge lines)

White lines are used for everything else - same-way traffic, edge lines, stop lines, pavement arrows, etc.

Dashed lines may be crossed if other vehicles aren't in the way; single solid lines mean crossing is discouraged; double solid lines mean crossing the line is prohibited unless you're crossing it to turn left at a + or T intersection (but lately they've stopped painting lines through intersections so that doesn't count anymore)

In some places, like at one place in Washington DC, yellow lines can be used for reversible lanes, and may be the centerline at some times and they may separate same-direction lanes at others.

Long-dashed lines like on the edges of Spanish autovías are almost never used, but there is one place in the Washington, DC area that uses a double yellow long-dashed line for reversible lanes.

Generally, a double line that is solid on one side and dashed on the other means that traffic on the dashed-line side may cross, but traffic on the solid-line side may not. But in some cases there's a two-way center turn lane, which have yellow solid outer lines and yellow dashed inner lines, and may be crossed from either direction to be used as a left-turn lane.
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Old January 10th, 2010, 01:47 PM   #83
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Why is it that some Brazilian motorways got a yellow centerline (on the left side of each carriageway) while on others it is all white?
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Old January 10th, 2010, 02:21 PM   #84
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Lack of standardization for center lines.
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Old January 10th, 2010, 04:53 PM   #85
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we brazilian use white(central line )




and use yellow lines


the city decide (yellow or white)
in this exemple use only yellow

Last edited by Di-brazil; January 10th, 2010 at 05:07 PM.
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Old January 11th, 2010, 12:16 AM   #86
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The first two photos have separate lanes for each direction, so you wouldn't necessarily need yellow lines. It should look more like the third photo, which while there is a gap between the two directions, there is a yellow line at the left edge as if it were an undivided highway. The last photo shows an undivided road with a yellow line as the divider.
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Old January 11th, 2010, 02:05 PM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nerdly_dood View Post
Yup, yellow lines are in the center of two-way roads and on the left shoulder of divided highways and, or so I hear, one-way roads. (I've yet to see a one-way road with edge lines - the only ones I see are urban ones with a curb and no edge lines)

White lines are used for everything else - same-way traffic, edge lines, stop lines, pavement arrows, etc.

Dashed lines may be crossed if other vehicles aren't in the way; single solid lines mean crossing is discouraged; double solid lines mean crossing the line is prohibited unless you're crossing it to turn left at a + or T intersection (but lately they've stopped painting lines through intersections so that doesn't count anymore)

In some places, like at one place in Washington DC, yellow lines can be used for reversible lanes, and may be the centerline at some times and they may separate same-direction lanes at others.

Long-dashed lines like on the edges of Spanish autovías are almost never used, but there is one place in the Washington, DC area that uses a double yellow long-dashed line for reversible lanes.

Generally, a double line that is solid on one side and dashed on the other means that traffic on the dashed-line side may cross, but traffic on the solid-line side may not. But in some cases there's a two-way center turn lane, which have yellow solid outer lines and yellow dashed inner lines, and may be crossed from either direction to be used as a left-turn lane.
Canada is exactly the same, except the part that I highlighted, which is somewhat interesting - in Canada, the outer lines are dashed and the inner lines are solid, like so:



In the US, it looks like this:



Just something I think is interesting .
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Old January 11th, 2010, 04:06 PM   #88
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Center turning lane is a major "missing" in road desing in Europe! They are so helpful.
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Old January 11th, 2010, 04:21 PM   #89
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I've seen something like it in Europe, but it is very rare.

N63, just south of Liège, Belgium
image hosted on flickr
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Old January 11th, 2010, 04:43 PM   #90
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Chris, I don't know if you are going to agree with me, but here in The Netherlands it seems that road authorities love do constrain 2X2 avenues into 1 lane each side to create turning lanes further down before intersections.
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Old January 11th, 2010, 05:37 PM   #91
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Dronninglund has a such bi-directional center turning lane. However, it's only 2-300m long. It works as a left-turn lane for 2 roads spaced 2-300m apart on opposite sides of the road. And for westbound cyclists going from the bike path on the right side of the road to the bi-directional bike path on the left side. The 2 roads are small residential roads, so there's no cars on it
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Old January 11th, 2010, 05:41 PM   #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
Chris, I don't know if you are going to agree with me, but here in The Netherlands it seems that road authorities love do constrain 2X2 avenues into 1 lane each side to create turning lanes further down before intersections.
Undivided 4-lane highways are extremely rare in the Netherlands, there are only a handful of them. Divided 4-lane highways usually don't have driveway or commercial acces directly on them.
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Old January 11th, 2010, 06:07 PM   #93
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by Highways do you mean autosnelwegen or "regular" roads??
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Old January 11th, 2010, 06:10 PM   #94
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Regular roads. Provincial highways, urban arteries. Not residential streets.
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Old January 11th, 2010, 06:17 PM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCat View Post
Canada is exactly the same, except the part that I highlighted, which is somewhat interesting - in Canada, the outer lines are dashed and the inner lines are solid, like so:



In the US, it looks like this:



Just something I think is interesting .
Yup I forgot to mention that Canada uses different lines in that case. But if there's a sign indicating th purpose for the lane in the US, it's black symbols on a white background, so your signs seem to be inside-out as well as your lines.
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Old January 11th, 2010, 08:49 PM   #96
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Some South African ones (taken from the country thread):

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


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Old January 11th, 2010, 08:51 PM   #97
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is there any standard for marking colors at all in South Africa??
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Old January 11th, 2010, 09:02 PM   #98
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What is the meaning of the centerline on pictures 1 and 3?
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Old January 11th, 2010, 09:05 PM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danielk2 View Post
is there any standard for marking colors at all in South Africa??
Yes:
  • White in the centre, yellow on the edges.
  • On freeways, the left edge will be yellow, but the right edge will be white. Helps to differentiate when you're on a freeway compared to when you're not. (Technically, it's still yellow on the edges and white in the centre!)
  • Following on from that, when you're on a "single-carriageway freeway" (the last of the pics that I posted), you get the white-yellow-white sequence in the centre.
  • The dotted yellow line that you see in the Cape Town pic denotes a reserved lane for a specific vehicle type. In that particular case, it's only reserved for buses during the morning peak period (clearly marked by overhead signage, not visible in the pic), which is why you see the car in it.

Easy!

Quote:
Originally Posted by philimonas View Post
What is the meaning of the centerline on pictures 1 and 3?
It's usually a dashed centreline (as in pic 4); the solid lines on the edge means no overtaking. If the solid line is on your side of the road, you can't overtake. In pics 1 and 3, overtaking is prohibited in both directions; in pic 2, you can overtake in one direction but not on the other.

If you look closely on pic 4, you'll notice the arrows on the centreline; they indicate to drivers overtaking that a no overtaking zone is coming up.

Last edited by Ron2K; January 11th, 2010 at 09:11 PM. Reason: Reply to philimonas, who got in while I was replying to Danielk2.
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Old January 11th, 2010, 09:27 PM   #100
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Portugal, (don't worry, most roads aren't this bad)
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