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Old January 2nd, 2009, 10:58 AM   #201
Timon91
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About the German ones: Cute

The Dutch ones unfortunately look like the Australian one. Boring
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Old January 2nd, 2009, 01:12 PM   #202
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timon91 View Post
About the German ones: Cute

The Dutch ones unfortunately look like the Australian one. Boring
The Belgian lights have an interesting cycle; but you really have to see them to give an opinion. (There is no such thing as a "Dutch light"; Belgium and the Netherlands (Holland) have completely different cycles(, where the Netherlands' ones are completely annoying).)

Belgium traffic lights have many cycles. But I'd have to tape one in action for real understandability.

Anyway, see ya!

Last edited by JonAxDrayda; January 2nd, 2009 at 02:55 PM. Reason: The "image"-details about the cycles I made didn't look how I planned it to be.
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Old January 2nd, 2009, 01:15 PM   #203
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Take a look at this
Japanese traffic light!
But who can explain why the traffic lights behave like this?

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Old January 2nd, 2009, 01:16 PM   #204
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@JonAxDrayda: I was actually talking about the pedestrian traffic lights, sorry for not being clear.
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Old January 2nd, 2009, 02:37 PM   #205
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timon91 View Post
@JonAxDrayda: I was actually talking about the pedestrian traffic lights, sorry for not being clear.
Oops, sorry. My bad. The pedestrian lights from Germany are indeed cute. ^_^ And the Dutch ones (in this case, the "Dutch ones" is correct) are indeed plain the same everywhere.

Oh, well. We're used to them, so we gotta live with it here. XD

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjkb230 View Post
Take a look at this
Japanese traffic light!
But who can explain why the traffic lights behave like this?

I think the arrows go on first to indicate a protected phase: the drivers to whom the lights are dedicated to can turn safely in the direction of the arrows. It's actually visible by looking at the cars coming from the other side. They remain stationair until the main green signal is active. And I think the amber and red phase between the green arrows and the main green signal is to indicate that the protected phase is about to end, because the drivers (nearly) keep on driving through this phase.

A bit weird, though, but they work like that, so I won't complain. (I'm a HUGE traffic-fan, BTW! I simply love everything, anything about traffic! That's why I won't complain with other countries' signal sequences.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Svartmetall View Post
They also have the ampelfrau in places as well! These little missies can be found in Dresden.

I thought I saw earlier in this thread similar lights in France, but appear slightly different. I'll search for it and edit this post as soon as I found them.

Last edited by JonAxDrayda; January 2nd, 2009 at 03:00 PM. Reason: Added (yet) another reply, (yet again) to make this thread a tad shorer.
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Old January 2nd, 2009, 04:54 PM   #206
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These are traffic lights in Venezuela. There are both types - vertical and horizontal. The colours are just the standard red, amber and green and then some have green directional arrows:

































































































































































































(more venezuelan traffic lights: #277, p.14)

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Old January 2nd, 2009, 05:12 PM   #207
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Originally Posted by DELCROID View Post
These are traffic lights in Venezuela. There are both types - vertical and horizontal. The colours are just the standard red, amber and green and then some have green directional arrows:

...
Wow, this will become one LONG page...
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Old January 2nd, 2009, 07:21 PM   #208
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Whats that Light with an Red X in it? Does it change to a green Arrow?
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Old January 2nd, 2009, 08:47 PM   #209
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Whats that Light with an Red X in it? Does it change to a green Arrow?
Those are the Lane Control signals.





The green arrow (always points down) simply means that you can use this lane.
The yellow arrow(s) (always pointing to the left and/or right) mean(s) that the lane is closing up ahead, and that you need to go to the lane(s) next to it.
The red cross simply means that you can not drive on this lane.

Site with more info on Lane Control Lights can be found here.
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 02:11 AM   #210
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonAxDrayda View Post
Those are the Lane Control signals.

The green arrow (always points down) simply means that you can use this lane.
The yellow arrow(s) (always pointing to the left and/or right) mean(s) that the lane is closing up ahead, and that you need to go to the lane(s) next to it.
The red cross simply means that you can not drive on this lane.

Site with more info on Lane Control Lights can be found here.
I wonder if that's the case here. It seems odd that you'd have vehicles sitting waiting for the lane to open up. From the streetlights, it also looks like it's on a divided road. Maybe the poster can explain.
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 02:29 AM   #211
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natomasken View Post
I wonder if that's the case here. It seems odd that you'd have vehicles sitting waiting for the lane to open up. From the streetlights, it also looks like it's on a divided road. Maybe the poster can explain.
Oh, I didn't notice that there were 2 countdown timers on the traffic light pole. That indeed makes it regular traffic lights. Although I wonder where these appear...

I've never seen such lights, unless they were the Lane Control Signals I talked about earlier. Sorry, can't help you much here.
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 09:28 AM   #212
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maroon Grown View Post
traffic lights in urban areas of australia are changing to led lights. they are much brighter and clearer to see.

the old incandescnt bulb with coloured face becomes harder to see with age as the cover gets dirtier, plus when the sun is low in the skyline, they are near impossible to see.

I agree with your description of the sun thing. Good thing they're changing to LED here in Puerto Rico, too!
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 12:15 PM   #213
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonAxDrayda View Post
- - There is the green arrow light, placed on the left side across the junction, pointing only to the left: this light is also called an "Evacuation Arrow", or "Ontruimingspijl" in Dutch. After the normal flow of traffic (usually, when you cross the junction here as a driver, the other side also has green), the other side gets an earlier red. 1 second after it does, this arrow light will start to burn until 2 seconds in the all-red. When this arrow light burns, the driver(s) that want to turn left and are standing still on the junction are ordered to evacuate and clear the junction. (NOT something like a protected left turn!)
Welcome to the forum, and thanks for reviving my old thread I find the quoted part of your post especially interesting. I always wondered how traffic turning left knows when the lights turn to amber/red while waiting inside the intersection for the turn, in countries where the traffic lights are placed before the intersection. This "evacuation arrow" seems like an interesting idea. Does it exist at all intersections that are not exclusively controlled by arrows, or is it only a "convenience feature" that is found on some intersections?

I still wonder though, how this is done in countries where this "evacuation arrow" does not exist. I presume that one just waits for all traffic to stop and then completes the turn, though knowing when the light actually changes is useful I think. In Canada we don't have this problem because the lights are always placed after the intersection, so you just complete the turn when the light changes to amber/red and all oncoming traffic stops.
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 02:31 PM   #214
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCat View Post
Welcome to the forum, and thanks for reviving my old thread I find the quoted part of your post especially interesting. I always wondered how traffic turning left knows when the lights turn to amber/red while waiting inside the intersection for the turn, in countries where the traffic lights are placed before the intersection. This "evacuation arrow" seems like an interesting idea. Does it exist at all intersections that are not exclusively controlled by arrows, or is it only a "convenience feature" that is found on some intersections?

I still wonder though, how this is done in countries where this "evacuation arrow" does not exist. I presume that one just waits for all traffic to stop and then completes the turn, though knowing when the light actually changes is useful I think. In Canada we don't have this problem because the lights are always placed after the intersection, so you just complete the turn when the light changes to amber/red and all oncoming traffic stops.
The "Evacuation Arrow" is mainly found on intersections controlled by mainly circled lights, where traffic is quite heavy to really heavy.

If you'd see one on the opposite side of the intersection you're at, then it can also be that there is a green right arrow on the left street from your P.O.V., for earlier right turns, since it becomes slightly protected.

When the arrow below is active, it is a Free Turn: pedestrians are not allowed to cross the street with that light when the arrow is active. They still have to give way to U-turning cars that might come from the right, since those drivers still have green and do not break the law with making one.
(These lights sometimes appear at a junction with an evacuation arrow, but only when that street has a separate right turn lane. Since they don't get cars from the left anymore, they can turn safely...)

Countries where the "Evacuation Arrow" is absent or no-existent, they either wait for the red light to appear (many countries repeat the light on the other side on the left (right hand traffic) or right (left hand traffic)) or have separate (protected) turns.

Thanks for the welcoming, BTW: It was a pleasure to join! ^_^

P.S.: A fun fact... In Belgium you DON'T HAVE TO drive on when you have green, in the Netherlands you HAVE TO drive on at green. Weird, but that's what both laws state. (You can't block traffic, since that still is forbidden by law.)
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Last edited by JonAxDrayda; January 3rd, 2009 at 02:35 PM. Reason: Added a fun fact I just thought of!
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 08:05 PM   #215
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonAxDrayda View Post
The "Evacuation Arrow" is mainly found on intersections controlled by mainly circled lights, where traffic is quite heavy to really heavy.

If you'd see one on the opposite side of the intersection you're at, then it can also be that there is a green right arrow on the left street from your P.O.V., for earlier right turns, since it becomes slightly protected.

When the arrow below is active, it is a Free Turn: pedestrians are not allowed to cross the street with that light when the arrow is active. They still have to give way to U-turning cars that might come from the right, since those drivers still have green and do not break the law with making one.
(These lights sometimes appear at a junction with an evacuation arrow, but only when that street has a separate right turn lane. Since they don't get cars from the left anymore, they can turn safely...)

Countries where the "Evacuation Arrow" is absent or no-existent, they either wait for the red light to appear (many countries repeat the light on the other side on the left (right hand traffic) or right (left hand traffic)) or have separate (protected) turns.
Here's a similar signal in Germany (Rothenburg).

image hosted on flickr

Last edited by Natomasken; January 3rd, 2009 at 09:15 PM.
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 09:38 PM   #216
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Quote:
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you'll never see 200mm or 8" signals in ontario, or anywhere I believe in North America on their own. And I believe outside of BC..we're the only ones to have the 12" Red and 8" amber and green signals.

However, depends on the municipality...alot of places in ontario do use the 12" (300mm) signals across the board (red, amber, and green) London doesn't. Toronto doesn't. Hamilton doesn't, but Burlington, Mississauga do.
Interesting thread the first time I come across.

Regarding on the signal head size that was discussed in a few months back, it is preferably to use 12" or 300mm signal head in the North America (I can't speak for rest of the world, but at least in the NA) industry these days, simply because they are physically bigger and more visible from distance providing longer reaction time for drivers to stop. For all arrow heads, they must be in 12" as required. 8" or 200mm ball is still allowed, but not preferred in normal situation.

But 8" head is still being used when the signal shouldn't be emphasized. For example, if there are two or more contagious intersections within a short distance, only the first signal on the approach should all be in 12" head to emphasize the signal and 8" for the next few so drivers aren't looking ahead and being confused. Worse case the driver is just going to confused by the red and stops before the intersection, and not running into crossing traffic. In this situation, many times the red remains as 12" and only yellow and green to be 8", so the red is always emphasized. It is allowed to use 8" green+yellow with a 12" red, but not vice versa.

If anyone in the US (or possibly Canada) is interested in traffic signal design or general design guideline, the US FHWA Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (aka MUTCD) is a good reference. This is the national design manual for engineers and it can get pretty dry. The manual is available at http://mutcd.fhwa.dot.gov/htm/2003r1.../part4-toc.htm
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 09:49 PM   #217
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjkb230 View Post
Take a look at this
Japanese traffic light!
But who can explain why the traffic lights behave like this?


Quote:
Originally Posted by JonAxDrayda View Post
I think the arrows go on first to indicate a protected phase: the drivers to whom the lights are dedicated to can turn safely in the direction of the arrows. It's actually visible by looking at the cars coming from the other side. They remain stationair until the main green signal is active. And I think the amber and red phase between the green arrows and the main green signal is to indicate that the protected phase is about to end, because the drivers (nearly) keep on driving through this phase.

A bit weird, though, but they work like that, so I won't complain. (I'm a HUGE traffic-fan, BTW! I simply love everything, anything about traffic! That's why I won't complain with other countries' signal sequences.)
I concur with this statement as well towards the Japanese signal operation.
But it is just weird to see all the arrows turn off, then the yellow comes on, followed by the red, and back to green ball again. If I were driving, I would have stopped for the red in between. Usually, the green ball will just come on when the arrows go away. I wonder does this cause many rear-ended collision.
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 09:56 PM   #218
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Originally Posted by Timon91 View Post
I like the countdown display. And what is the use of the double red? I've seen it in Germany before.
Maybe just in case red light doesn't work, there is still a back-up.
In Maryland, there are signals where two red lights for one signal head are used for simply this purpose.
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 11:31 PM   #219
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In the Netherlands, in case of a traffic light failure, all lights automatically are going to blink orange. (like they do at night when there's nearly no traffic). Regular road laws take over then. All traffic light intersections in the Netherlands also have traffic markings on the roadway, so traffic can still continue when the lights are out of operation.
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Old January 3rd, 2009, 11:40 PM   #220
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A bunch of traffic lights in Hong Kong:



























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