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Old February 14th, 2010, 06:01 AM   #301
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traffic light in Brazil









































































































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Old February 14th, 2010, 07:35 AM   #302
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Typical Australian traffic lights:


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Old February 15th, 2010, 12:25 AM   #303
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Here's how the Japanese do protected right turns...



Wierd, huh?

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Old February 15th, 2010, 02:51 AM   #304
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Here's how the Japanese do protected right turns...



Wierd, huh?
The logic is similar to the one for protected left turns in some traffic lights Costa Rica. In that case, what happens most of the time is that one direction gets green for all directions, while all other traffic (including oncoming traffic) gets red. This applies for non-priority roads that end with a traffic light, while priority roads get green for going straight and for right turns. Then for protected left turns, it approximately goes this way, e.g. on an East-West road with a traffic light: For protected turns, the West lane gets green while the East lane gets red, then the West lane gets red and the East lane gets green, while the non-priority roads get green in the sequence I already outlined above.

BTW, Costa Rica uses US type diamond signage, but I've always been an advocate of dumping the current description based signs with pictographic signs like in Europe (including the introduction of the Priority Road sign, and increased use of Give Way signs, as most simple roads don't even need a Stop sign).
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Old February 15th, 2010, 04:51 AM   #305
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Old February 15th, 2010, 08:54 PM   #306
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie D. View Post
The logic is similar to the one for protected left turns in some traffic lights Costa Rica. In that case, what happens most of the time is that one direction gets green for all directions, while all other traffic (including oncoming traffic) gets red. This applies for non-priority roads that end with a traffic light, while priority roads get green for going straight and for right turns. Then for protected left turns, it approximately goes this way, e.g. on an East-West road with a traffic light: For protected turns, the West lane gets green while the East lane gets red, then the West lane gets red and the East lane gets green, while the non-priority roads get green in the sequence I already outlined above.

BTW, Costa Rica uses US type diamond signage, but I've always been an advocate of dumping the current description based signs with pictographic signs like in Europe (including the introduction of the Priority Road sign, and increased use of Give Way signs, as most simple roads don't even need a Stop sign).
I'm pretty sure that the thing he found weird about those lights is that all directions are allowed and afterwards the light switches to red and very shortly afterwards back to green. In this case it would've been more logical to just have a green light (the arrow lights aren't exactly needed in this situation).

There's nothing wrong with having the arrow lights mounted on the post and not using them, that's what sometimes happens here in Belgium when they apply a different light sequence due to traffic streams that have changed over time which require a different approach for an optimal solution (whether it actually results in a more optimal situation is usually another discussion).

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Old February 16th, 2010, 09:38 AM   #307
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Hehe yeah, all that would be needed at such an intersection is a single right-pointing arrow, like it is commonly done here in Toronto (only it is pointing left in our case).

I guess the way they do it allows them to use a single yellow light. In Toronto, for example, the arrow appears green, then changes its colour to yellow, and then just disappears. If it appears with green, it means all directions are protected (well, not precisely, because when turning right pedestrians could also be facing a green). If it appears with red, then only the left turn is protected.

In some other locations in the province of Ontario there are two arrow lights - one green, and one yellow, that achieve the same thing. In Toronto I haven't seen those though, all lights have a single arrow that goes from green to yellow.

By the way, in the case of a protected left only (i.e. green left arrow with a red light), the effect here is similar to the Japanese one - when the arrow disappears, there is a pause before the main red light switches to green, in which case one technically should briefly stop (though some people just continue to enter the intersection if turning left).
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Old February 17th, 2010, 01:09 PM   #308
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Old February 21st, 2010, 05:39 AM   #309
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A Traffic light setup in St Catharines, Ontario, It connects Highway 406 to Welland Avenue, and 4th Avenue, the actual lights themselves were since replaced with updated 3M traffic signals that resemble the other Ontarian ones.

I'll get more pics later of this funny intersection.
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Old March 16th, 2010, 08:36 PM   #310
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Traffic lights and traffic controllers

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Old March 16th, 2010, 11:31 PM   #311
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A few from Seattle...





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Old March 17th, 2010, 01:12 PM   #312
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Interesting. The various flashing yellow phases mean "yield to oncoming traffic"?
By the way, that left arrow in the last video is insanely long .
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Old March 17th, 2010, 07:20 PM   #313
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Interesting. The various flashing yellow phases mean "yield to oncoming traffic"?
By the way, that left arrow in the last video is insanely long .
Yes. It's not very common now, but a few states/cities are starting to adopt or experiment with flashing yellow arrows in place of green balls for permissive turns (i.e., ok to turn left or right after yielding to oncoming traffic).

Seattle has been using the flashing yellow ball for about 30 - 40 years now, but they are slowing phasing them out in favor of a flashing yellow arrow. Mountlake Terrace (just north of the King/Snohomish County line) also uses flashing yellow balls, but with 2 differences: A sign indicating traffic to yield on the flashing yellow and the turn signal is set up so that through traffic can't really see it.
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Old March 17th, 2010, 08:17 PM   #314
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In Denmark, our traffic lights differ a bit from the rest of the world.

First off, our traffic lights have four states:


At large intersections, you may find "turning signals".
These exists ALMOST exclusively in left-turn versions. They are red until the opposing traffic gets a red light, then it will turn green, and allow people to turn left (usually from both sides at the same time). It also exist in a "green light only" version. Green turning signal means that ALL other crossing traffic has a red light, be this oncoming traffic, crossing traffic, pedestrians or bicycles.

Like in Amsterdam, we have special signals for bicycles. These signals are much smaller than the normal signals, and they have a bicycle painted above them.
These also exist in turning signal-versions.
In most intersections, the bicycle light is a few seconds ahead of the normal traffic light, to give bicycles a headstart into the intersection, and to clear the intersection in time for when the red signal appears.

Our pedestrian signals only have green and red lights. In intersections with a lot of pedestrians, or where jaywalking may occur regularly, countdown signals have been placed:


Finally, we have "reversed" signals, which may be placed in intersections where left-turn is usually difficult. These signals feature only red and yellow lights. In this case, "red" means go, not "stop", as it shows what the signal the oncoming traffic has. Usually, this signal is paired with a "left turn" green signal.
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Old March 17th, 2010, 08:37 PM   #315
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spikespiegel View Post
In Denmark, our traffic lights differ a bit from the rest of the world.

First off, our traffic lights have four states:
...like in most of the Europe (I think that the Netherlands are the only European country without "red+yellow" phase).

When I stayed in Denmark I was really annoyed with Danish 2-phase pedestrian lights (i.e. without 'blinking green / yellow / be careful, red signal in a second' phase). You see a green signal, approach the curb and a second before stepping on the asphalt WHAM - you get red light, without any warning. Annoying
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Old March 17th, 2010, 10:45 PM   #316
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...like in most of the Europe (I think that the Netherlands are the only European country without "red+yellow" phase).
I noticed a similar attempt last I was in Poland: red+yellow not removed, but shortened to minimum (like 500ms).

And I stand by the Dutch, I think they are right, we don't need red+yellow anymore, and I guess lack thereof keeps people more alert.
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Old March 17th, 2010, 10:55 PM   #317
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We do need them. You need this extra second to engage the first gear and it speeds up whole 'starting from intersection' process, especially when a less-experienced driver is in front of the queue.
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Old March 17th, 2010, 11:03 PM   #318
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I also think we need them, especially in hilly areas, where you can release the clutch earlier to increase the throughput of a traffic light. A delay of 1 - 2 seconds can significantly reduce the efficiency of a traffic light.
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Old March 18th, 2010, 12:11 AM   #319
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spikespiegel View Post
Finally, we have "reversed" signals, which may be placed in intersections where left-turn is usually difficult. These signals feature only red and yellow lights. In this case, "red" means go, not "stop", as it shows what the signal the oncoming traffic has. Usually, this signal is paired with a "left turn" green signal.
Heh that's kind of interesting (and possibly confusing to tourists). We have no need for such signals here in Canada because traffic lights are placed after the intersection, so you always see when the light changes to yellow/green and thus, what light oncoming traffic faces (this of course may not be the case if the oncoming traffic faces a different light, but that's rare and would not happen when you're waiting to turn left on a green light).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuzzy Llama View Post
...like in most of the Europe (I think that the Netherlands are the only European country without "red+yellow" phase).
I believe France also does not have the "red+yellow" phase.
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Old March 18th, 2010, 04:46 PM   #320
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuzzy Llama View Post
...like in most of the Europe (I think that the Netherlands are the only European country without "red+yellow" phase).
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCat View Post
I believe France also does not have the "red+yellow" phase.
In Spain we don't either.
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