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Old December 31st, 2010, 08:14 AM   #461
Metro One
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And to follow up on my last posts here are a few pics of mine showing what traffic lights / intersections look like in British COlumbia, Canada:

Here is an intersection in the resort town of Osoyoos in the dry interior of BC

image hosted on flickr



Here is looking down Kingsway in Burnaby (a suburb of Vancouver)

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And one a little more close up, same area

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Pics are my own, cheers!
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Old December 31st, 2010, 09:06 AM   #462
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In regard of Belgium, there is something that worries me: signs that are opened to you in 2-way avenues or large streets without any indication about whether are you going to face incoming traffic when turning left or making a U-turn.
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Old December 31st, 2010, 01:24 PM   #463
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth View Post
So this is the new standard for Brussels now? Seem like Euro-standard Swarco signals. Very smart, but they have less character than the traditional Benelux design (actually, I don't know what Luxembourgs traffic signals look like).

But, I assume, after federalization, Wallonia kept the original Beligian standards, whilst Flanders changed it to the black & yellow standard and this is how it remains? Or are these plainer signals entering other parts of Belgium as well?

That is indeed how the situation is at the moment. Altough Wallonia developped a new standerd like Flanders in which white and red are switched. Red is now the base colour and white the contraster whereas in the past it was more of a pattern. Considering the plainer signals, they're not spreading across Belgium as far as I know, the only city that uses them is Antwerp and that is only on the renewed main avenue. Al the other Flemish signals in Antwerp have been painted gray though but the original shape remains.
About traffic signals in Luxemburg, they're the same as the old Belgian ones.

Vintage picture



Old belgian ones, painted in the Flemish color scheme




Newer Flemish ones (with shields)






Newest Flemish lights













Special ones in Antwerp




(Repainted)

Traffic lights in Luxemburg

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Pedistrean buttons
Wallonia


Flanders
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Old December 31st, 2010, 01:45 PM   #464
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Most places in Denmark has those buttons as a standard, they're very rarely signed.
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Old December 31st, 2010, 01:58 PM   #465
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They're standard here as wel, together with a sound for people with a visual handicap. They're signed so people know that they're for cyclists or pedistreans.
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Old December 31st, 2010, 04:34 PM   #466
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fargo Wolf View Post
They mounted the damn light upside down...
The locals don't like the English red on top of the Irish green

-------------------

Anyway, this is in Figueira da Foz, Portugal. Figueira has a huge lack of traffic lights, other than for traffic calming on the N109 and the N111 outside of the city and for pedestrians along the sea front.

But, there are only about 4 actual junctions in the town with traffic lights, with a lot of roundabouts desperately in need of them.

Anyway, the newer lights for traffic calming and for the newest traffic light junctions have green poles. Most of them have traffic lights above the roadway, but this photo is the ony one I had, which doesn't have the higher pole, but they look like that just higher up.



Edit:

I found a pic of an older traffic light (sorry for quality, I as aiming at the taxi):



(The roundabout at the far back in this photo, is pretty big and could really do with traffic lights.
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Old December 31st, 2010, 07:03 PM   #467
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Although not the same as the Benelux signal family, UK signals used to also be striped, although the stripes were much thicker.

On very earliest signals, the stripe scheme was a bit crazy; the stripes went all the way up the pole, including the signal head, where the amber aspect would be painted white.





In the sixties, the scheme was calmed down somewhat, with only the bottom half of the pole being striped. Personally, I like this scheme the best....

(note the 'STOP' command lense that British signals had during the stripey era)







Sadly, in anticipation of the arrival of new design UK signal, the scheme was changed to plain grey (black in London for some reason). This standard changed little between 1970-2000...




Since then, design rules have relaxed somewhat and different styles of signal heads are allowed (albeit to still comparatively strict UK regulations). Also, making the pole grey is not such a fundamental rule anymore and local authorities often pick their own schemes. Wolverhampton had the first set of traffic signals in the UK and to commemerate this, they replaced older grey signals with modern signals where the pole was striped (in the revised scheme). I think it looks really good and wish it was still standard...


Last edited by Gareth; December 31st, 2010 at 07:13 PM.
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Old December 31st, 2010, 10:18 PM   #468
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Cool pics, I always love historical footage. When it comes to Belgium, our traffic signals have had the same design all the way back to their introduction.
Not even the the high masts have changed since they're introduced.
The thing now with abandoning the use of shields, is the first big change in their history.
They claim its for durability for the old shields caught to much wind and put to much stress on the construction.
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Old January 2nd, 2011, 10:27 PM   #469
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This is hilarious. Just found this article on Belgian unionists painting over the Flemish traffic lights...

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Economist
Belgian traffic lights sending political signals

Mar 2nd 2008, 19:08 by Charlemagne

*
*

BELGIAN traffic lights have long sent political signals, as well as commands to stop and start. In Brussels and the French-speaking south, the posts of traffic lights are painted with red and white bands, but as soon as you cross into Dutch-speaking Flanders, they suddenly turn yellow and black striped, like bumble bees. This is because the flag of Flanders is a black lion on a yellow ground, and a few years ago changing the paintwork of traffic signs seemed to Flemish politicians like a good wheeze for conveying Flemish national pride to passing drivers.

Recently, however, cheeky pro-Belgium scamps have taken to amending the paint scheme, in a small protest related to the political crisis that began with last summer's national parliamentary elections (a temporary government is currently on course to become a permanent government at the end of this month, after a mere ten months of wrangling). In the Flemish suburbs closest to Brussels, they have been quietly adding a red stripe to the posts, so that they are now bear stripes of black, yellow and red: the national colours of the Kingdom of Belgium, and of the country's national tricolour flag. Your reporter first heard about this the other day when taking part in a rather bruising political debate with the Belgian EU commissioner, Louis Michel (who called this reporter "perfide" for wondering whether Belgium was in fact a functioning democracy, It is a word you do not hear often, whether you are from Albion or not). A member of the audience alleged that some of those caught painting turning Flemish traffic lights into Belgian traffic lights had been accused of vandalism, and suggested this raised interesting legal questions as to whether patriotism could be equated to vandalism. I have also heard that Flemish nationalists have been fighting back with black paint, working to erase red stripes as quickly as possible.

Tonight, driving through Tervuren, on the edge of Brussels, your reporter saw his first Belgified traffic lights. Alas, the red stripe was a bit wobbly, and the paint had dripped over the next stripes down. But the message was clear enough. The logical next step could be for Belgian's small rattachiste movement, who want the French speaking parts of the country to be voluntarily absorbed into France, to take blue paint to those red and white striped traffic lights in Brussels and Wallonia, and Frenchify them into feux tricouleurs.
http://www.economist.com/blogs/certainideasofeurope/2008/03/belgian_traffic_lights_sending
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 01:39 PM   #470
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 05:55 PM   #471
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Yeah, I've heard about it a few years ago. Altough the Flemish government never claimed that they repainted the traffic lights after the state reform because of Flemish pride. They did it according to them because white and black are more eye catching colours than the old Belgian Red & White.
The Walloons often see those colours as the ultimate example of daily nationalism but we Flemish people never really thought about it. Ofcourse, now after all those claims and accusations, we do. Talking about a boomerang effect...

Nevertheless, I've gotten used to the striped contrast system. So used that I sometimes overlook traffic lights in country's (Germany...) where they use a very minimalistic set-up.

Last edited by Wimpie; January 3rd, 2011 at 06:40 PM.
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 07:40 PM   #472
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wimpie View Post
The Walloons often see those colours as the ultimate example of daily nationalism but we Flemish people never really thought about it.
"them Walloons think that way and we Flemish think this way"

How do you know what groups made of millions people think?

This way of thinking bugs me, like if there was one single brain for millions of people. (well sometimes it seems like it, but still...)
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 08:09 PM   #473
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tchek View Post
"them Walloons think that way and we Flemish think this way"

How do you know what groups made of millions people think?
Just by looking at their politics. Belgium is barely a single country because of what millions of people think
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 09:22 PM   #474
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g.spinoza View Post
Just by looking at their politics. Belgium is barely a single country because of what millions of people think
The reason Belgium is barely a single country is due to the divided political system; so the country was condamned in the first place. I am sure not every Flemish is a NVA member, OR that the politics of the NVA is agreed by every single Flemish, because I don't think that the "Flemish" consistute one collective body of single thought, the same way that I doubt that every Wallonian lost sleep over the black/yellow stripes of the traffic lights in Flanders.
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 10:14 PM   #475
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It wasn't condemned in the first place. A blend of Francophone domination in the old days, followed by surely the most disasterous example of federalism the world has ever seen, is what's boloxed Belgium. It's amazing it hasn't imploded already.

Regardless, the traffic light thing is an example of how dumb nationalism is. I wonder if the SNP in Scotland will start paining Scottish traffic lights tarten, because at the moment, they're identical to English traffic lights and that won't do.
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Old January 4th, 2011, 01:56 AM   #476
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wimpie View Post
Another few pictures of Belgian lights:

This is an intersection with new LED-lights, they no longer use the "circular back-shield" which is a shame to my opionion


How common are overhead mast arms in Europe? They seem very rare in the UK, but are relatively common in the suburban areas of French cities, based on what I've seen on streetview?
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Old January 4th, 2011, 04:45 AM   #477
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They're a lot more common in most European countries compared to the UK. They're not as rare here as they once were, but they're still not that common.
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Old January 4th, 2011, 12:45 PM   #478
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I can only speak for the Benelux but they're very common here. You will rarely encounter a trafficlight without a mast. The Belgian ones were actually modelled after American mast lights in the first place. Belgium and the US were on a similar line when it came to road construction and the economical climate and political ideoligies until about 1980.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth View Post
It wasn't condemned in the first place. A blend of Francophone domination in the old days, followed by surely the most disasterous example of federalism the world has ever seen, is what's boloxed Belgium. It's amazing it hasn't imploded already.
It wasn't just that, the Flemish were considered to be untermenschen by Walloons until the 1930's, after that we still were second hand citizens until the 1960's when the federalisation process began. To me it was the best thing that could happen to Flanders because without the Walloons would have halted the growth of the Flemish economy for years in favour of their collapsing industrial empire.
Don't get me wrong, without that industrial empire we would have been the great country we were in the day but all of that was established on the backs of the working cattle that the Walloons called "les Flamands".
Today the situation is the oposite of what it was. Flanders is now multiple times richer, the incomes are higher with 17 %, the unemployement rate is about 8 % compared to 21% in Walloni, the population is bigger, people are healthier and live longer (81 years <> 78 in Wallonia). All these numbers are found on the website of the NIS (national institute for Statistics).

Last edited by Wimpie; January 4th, 2011 at 12:51 PM.
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Old January 4th, 2011, 02:31 PM   #479
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N3 In Sint-Truiden, viewed twoards Tiennen, Belgium
Overhanging lampposts on both sides.

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Last edited by joshsam; January 4th, 2011 at 02:45 PM.
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Old January 4th, 2011, 02:51 PM   #480
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Complete overhead on the N80 in Sint-Truiden. You can find them on almost all 4x4 roads in Belgium that are not highways. Mostly expressways have lights like this.

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