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Old August 16th, 2007, 06:33 PM   #261
IndyYeah
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Originally Posted by NaptownBoy View Post
My God this thing is going to be huge. Just look at the roof!
I height, I wonder how high it will be compared to other large sports stadiums around the world?
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Old August 22nd, 2007, 02:08 AM   #262
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Read this article today, thought it was interesting:

Inside the RCA Dome, workers have been testing the public-address system, fixing broken seats and painting goal posts for tonight's preseason matchup between the Indianapolis Colts and Chicago Bears.

August 2007: About 850 people are working on the stadium site each day, and much of their focus is on the retractable roof. Two of the five steel roof trusses that form the peak are in place. - CHARLIE NYE / The Star

Across the street, crews are busy preparing for a different season kickoff -- one that is almost exactly a year away.
Lucas Oil Stadium, the $700 million or so goliath rising just south of the RCA Dome, must be ready in time for the 2008 NFL season. The league won't set a game schedule for some time, so the state authority that is building the arena has given itself until Aug. 15, 2008, to make the stadium game-ready.
Between now and then, the Indiana Stadium and Convention Building Authority also must solve a parking problem that has left the stadium 1,000 spaces short.
"It's an aggressive schedule everyone will work hard to meet," said John Klipsch, executive director of the building authority. "The start-up of a building of this magnitude is a monumental task. It will take a lot of people . . . burning the midnight oil."
Here's what lies ahead.
First, the roof

About 850 people are working on the stadium site each day, and much of their focus is on the roof. Two of the five steel trusses that form the peak of the roof are in place, and structural steel should be finished by the end of the year.
Retractable panels on the west side of the stadium should be operational in February. Those on the east side are expected to move for the first time in April, and the roof will be complete next summer.
The large window in the north end zone that will open to reveal a view of Downtown will be installed in late spring or early summer. Field turf will go in next summer.
Klipsch said things will get particularly intense in the final months, when construction workers will be finishing up and employees from the RCA Dome will need broad access to the stadium to learn how to use the new equipment and systems.
Dome demolition

The opening of Lucas Oil Stadium will mean the end of the RCA Dome, which will be razed to make way for an expansion of the Indiana Convention Center.
Officials overseeing the stadium and Convention Center projects hope to start taking the Dome down in April.
Before that can happen, the Colts must sign off. Pete Ward, the team's senior executive vice president, said it is too early to say whether the team will approve the envisioned timeline.
"Obviously, everyone needs to be certain that the new stadium will be ready for us before we leave the Dome," he said.
Exactly how the RCA Dome will come down is still being decided. The operation is somewhat tricky because the Dome is connected to the Convention Center, and the buildings share some utilities.
Bill Browne, president of Indianapolis-based RATIO Architects, the lead design firm on the Convention Center project, said construction managers are considering an implosion or a more conventional demolition approach that would entail removing the building in chunks.
"The implosion tends to be more spectacular, but no one is looking for that as part of this project," Browne said. "We're looking to make sure we do it properly."
Safety will be the deciding factor, Klipsch said.
In either case, it likely will take about four months to clear the site, Browne said.
Big parking problem

Under the terms of the deal with the Colts, Lucas Oil Stadium must have 3,000 parking spaces. So far, the building authority has room for 2,000, and nearby property is either too expensive or has already been gobbled up.
Building authority officials have been working for months to figure out a solution but don't have an answer.
The board considered building a parking garage, but that would cost $25 million to $30 million and is no longer a preferred option.
Klipsch wouldn't say what idea is now favored, citing continuing negotiations, but said "everything is on the table."
Among the possible solutions: putting a lot farther from the stadium, leasing spaces from an existing garage on game days or entering a public-private partnership with a developer.
Any of those ideas would need approval from the Colts, because the team's lease requires the parking spaces be in surface lots on or adjacent to stadium land.
Ward, the Colts executive, said the team is waiting to see what is presented and is "keeping an open mind."
The stadium's price tag, once $675 million, is now pegged at $695.2 million to $719.6 million -- because of higher-than-expected costs for steel, soil cleanup and insurance, and because the state paid the Colts a $48 million lease-termination fee. The new bottom line doesn't include whatever it takes to fix the parking problem.
The building authority still hasn't figured out where the extra money will come from, but Klipsch pledged that taxpayers won't be asked to chip in more.
"There will be no more tax money needed to finish this project," he said.
A need for more money

The city also is facing financial issues relating to the new stadium.
The Capital Improvement Board has estimated that the new venue eventually will cost at least $10 million more a year to run than the RCA Dome, primarily because it is bigger and will require more to heat, cool, clean, staff, maintain, insure and generally operate.
The board won't have a firm grasp on the extra costs until it has a full year of operations under its belt.
Today, a year before the new stadium opens, the city still doesn't know where the money will come from in future years.
Fred Glass, the head of the Capital Improvement Board, said the issue won't prevent the stadium from opening on time or cause a problem the first year.
The board won't take over the stadium until sometime around August, and there shouldn't be any maintenance costs at first. As a result, the board expects the new stadium to add $2 million to $4 million to its 2008 budget, and that money is expected to come from the board's reserves, Glass said.
The Capital Improvement Board also should have enough in its reserves to cover the extra operating costs for 2009 and possibly longer, though eventually it would run out of money, Glass said.
The city wanted to pay for increased operating costs with money left over after construction loans are paid, but lawmakers who approved the stadium financing package instead ordered that excess cash be used to pay down debt early. The stadium is primarily being funded by restaurant, hotel and car-rental taxes in Marion County, and restaurant taxes in surrounding counties.
Glass expects to bring the issue to the General Assembly in 2009 -- the next time the legislature takes up the state budget. He declined to say exactly what solution he would push for but said he hopes the problem can be solved without new taxes.
"My belief and hope is that we can sit down and sort out some things that can make this work in a way that everybody's comfortable with," Glass said.
Whether the state is inclined to listen is unclear.
State Sen. Luke Kenley, R-Noblesville, the author of the stadium financing legislation, said he has not had any conversations with representatives of the Capital Improvement Board.
"It has to start with the CIB," he said.
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Old August 22nd, 2007, 04:02 AM   #263
araman0
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CorrND View Post
Coming back to downtown from picking up my wife from the airport on Sunday, I noticed that one of the best views of the stadium in relation to downtown is between the Holt Rd. exit and the bridge over Tibbs Ave. The stadium is really massive and impressive the closer you to downtown, but I think that the view from a distance really puts things in perspective. In particular, it shows you how far the stadium is from the core of buildings downtown.
I think it would be a great idea for someone to post some of these more distant pictures which show the stadium's impact and relation to the downtown skyline. I have a hard time visualizing how this looks in relation to the rest of the skyline now that I don't live nearby anymore.
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Old August 22nd, 2007, 04:19 AM   #264
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aavmarine View Post
Read this article today, thought it was interesting:

Inside the RCA Dome, workers have been testing the public-address system, fixing broken seats and painting goal posts for tonight's preseason matchup between the Indianapolis Colts and Chicago Bears.

August 2007: About 850 people are working on the stadium site each day, and much of their focus is on the retractable roof. Two of the five steel roof trusses that form the peak are in place. - CHARLIE NYE / The Star

Across the street, crews are busy preparing for a different season kickoff -- one that is almost exactly a year away.
Lucas Oil Stadium, the $700 million or so goliath rising just south of the RCA Dome, must be ready in time for the 2008 NFL season. The league won't set a game schedule for some time, so the state authority that is building the arena has given itself until Aug. 15, 2008, to make the stadium game-ready.
Between now and then, the Indiana Stadium and Convention Building Authority also must solve a parking problem that has left the stadium 1,000 spaces short.
"It's an aggressive schedule everyone will work hard to meet," said John Klipsch, executive director of the building authority. "The start-up of a building of this magnitude is a monumental task. It will take a lot of people . . . burning the midnight oil."
Here's what lies ahead.
First, the roof

About 850 people are working on the stadium site each day, and much of their focus is on the roof. Two of the five steel trusses that form the peak of the roof are in place, and structural steel should be finished by the end of the year.
Retractable panels on the west side of the stadium should be operational in February. Those on the east side are expected to move for the first time in April, and the roof will be complete next summer.
The large window in the north end zone that will open to reveal a view of Downtown will be installed in late spring or early summer. Field turf will go in next summer.
Klipsch said things will get particularly intense in the final months, when construction workers will be finishing up and employees from the RCA Dome will need broad access to the stadium to learn how to use the new equipment and systems.
Dome demolition

The opening of Lucas Oil Stadium will mean the end of the RCA Dome, which will be razed to make way for an expansion of the Indiana Convention Center.
Officials overseeing the stadium and Convention Center projects hope to start taking the Dome down in April.
Before that can happen, the Colts must sign off. Pete Ward, the team's senior executive vice president, said it is too early to say whether the team will approve the envisioned timeline.
"Obviously, everyone needs to be certain that the new stadium will be ready for us before we leave the Dome," he said.
Exactly how the RCA Dome will come down is still being decided. The operation is somewhat tricky because the Dome is connected to the Convention Center, and the buildings share some utilities.
Bill Browne, president of Indianapolis-based RATIO Architects, the lead design firm on the Convention Center project, said construction managers are considering an implosion or a more conventional demolition approach that would entail removing the building in chunks.
"The implosion tends to be more spectacular, but no one is looking for that as part of this project," Browne said. "We're looking to make sure we do it properly."
Safety will be the deciding factor, Klipsch said.
In either case, it likely will take about four months to clear the site, Browne said.
Big parking problem

Under the terms of the deal with the Colts, Lucas Oil Stadium must have 3,000 parking spaces. So far, the building authority has room for 2,000, and nearby property is either too expensive or has already been gobbled up.
Building authority officials have been working for months to figure out a solution but don't have an answer.
The board considered building a parking garage, but that would cost $25 million to $30 million and is no longer a preferred option.
Klipsch wouldn't say what idea is now favored, citing continuing negotiations, but said "everything is on the table."
Among the possible solutions: putting a lot farther from the stadium, leasing spaces from an existing garage on game days or entering a public-private partnership with a developer.
Any of those ideas would need approval from the Colts, because the team's lease requires the parking spaces be in surface lots on or adjacent to stadium land.
Ward, the Colts executive, said the team is waiting to see what is presented and is "keeping an open mind."
The stadium's price tag, once $675 million, is now pegged at $695.2 million to $719.6 million -- because of higher-than-expected costs for steel, soil cleanup and insurance, and because the state paid the Colts a $48 million lease-termination fee. The new bottom line doesn't include whatever it takes to fix the parking problem.
The building authority still hasn't figured out where the extra money will come from, but Klipsch pledged that taxpayers won't be asked to chip in more.
"There will be no more tax money needed to finish this project," he said.
A need for more money

The city also is facing financial issues relating to the new stadium.
The Capital Improvement Board has estimated that the new venue eventually will cost at least $10 million more a year to run than the RCA Dome, primarily because it is bigger and will require more to heat, cool, clean, staff, maintain, insure and generally operate.
The board won't have a firm grasp on the extra costs until it has a full year of operations under its belt.
Today, a year before the new stadium opens, the city still doesn't know where the money will come from in future years.
Fred Glass, the head of the Capital Improvement Board, said the issue won't prevent the stadium from opening on time or cause a problem the first year.
The board won't take over the stadium until sometime around August, and there shouldn't be any maintenance costs at first. As a result, the board expects the new stadium to add $2 million to $4 million to its 2008 budget, and that money is expected to come from the board's reserves, Glass said.
The Capital Improvement Board also should have enough in its reserves to cover the extra operating costs for 2009 and possibly longer, though eventually it would run out of money, Glass said.
The city wanted to pay for increased operating costs with money left over after construction loans are paid, but lawmakers who approved the stadium financing package instead ordered that excess cash be used to pay down debt early. The stadium is primarily being funded by restaurant, hotel and car-rental taxes in Marion County, and restaurant taxes in surrounding counties.
Glass expects to bring the issue to the General Assembly in 2009 -- the next time the legislature takes up the state budget. He declined to say exactly what solution he would push for but said he hopes the problem can be solved without new taxes.
"My belief and hope is that we can sit down and sort out some things that can make this work in a way that everybody's comfortable with," Glass said.
Whether the state is inclined to listen is unclear.
State Sen. Luke Kenley, R-Noblesville, the author of the stadium financing legislation, said he has not had any conversations with representatives of the Capital Improvement Board.
"It has to start with the CIB," he said.
Great, thanks for posting this man. I was too lazy to post it my damn self.
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Old August 22nd, 2007, 04:41 PM   #265
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moochie View Post
The more I see this stadium, the more I like the design. I've always been a bigger fan of ultra modern architecture, but the location of this structure and the way it complements it's surroundings is just fantastic. I can't imagine I'd be nearly as enthused if a huge spaceship looking thing were rising on the skyline.

The Luke is like great sculpture in that it looks like it's always been there, as if it grew naturally up from the ground. It simply belongs where it is.
yah, I'm worried that the very old brick warehouses/industrial structues its designed to mimick, will be demolished for parking or facilities, in which, could affect the way the luke fits in.
But the design does fit in quiet well with the brick gritty feel of that area.
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Old August 24th, 2007, 02:55 AM   #266
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I am concerned about how the CIB will fund the annual maintenance costs of the stadium. What good is a stadium if it is not maintained?
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Old August 26th, 2007, 10:19 PM   #267
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Here are a few pics I took in July





Poor RCA Dome, sitting there oblivious to the troubles that await it.



the stacks, LOS, @ Victory Field



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Old August 26th, 2007, 10:23 PM   #268
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great pictures, the LOS really looks like an old warehouse structure.
I wish the stacks building could be converted into condos and the stacks removed.
I like that brick section of it, the los goes with it lol.
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Old August 27th, 2007, 03:00 AM   #269
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No, unionstation. Have the stacks be converted into apartements and condos with an espnzone on ground level and light the stacks up at night. Those stacks could be very valuable and add a very unique look to dt if done properly.

I used to hate the stacks cause they were dirty and, well plain nasty looking lol. But, Cory made the statement that they added context to the area and made it unique. After I read that I thought, your right! SO now I do not mind the stacks. I just wish they would be converted and cleaned up, while also being lit at night. They would offer amazing views on all four sides at that!!!
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Old August 27th, 2007, 06:01 PM   #270
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The stacks are the shit. And yes, they should be converted into living space.
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Old August 28th, 2007, 12:14 AM   #271
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Quote:
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The stacks are the shit. And yes, they should be converted into living space.
Those stacks are only 16 feet or so in diameter.

Although, if large enough, they would be cool to live in.

Last edited by NaptownBoy; August 28th, 2007 at 12:20 AM.
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Old August 28th, 2007, 02:04 AM   #272
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No, unionstation. Have the stacks be converted into apartements and condos with an espnzone on ground level and light the stacks up at night. Those stacks could be very valuable and add a very unique look to dt if done properly.

I used to hate the stacks cause they were dirty and, well plain nasty looking lol. But, Cory made the statement that they added context to the area and made it unique. After I read that I thought, your right! SO now I do not mind the stacks. I just wish they would be converted and cleaned up, while also being lit at night. They would offer amazing views on all four sides at that!!!
your right.
I think though, it would be cool if they were painted like candy-cains with red and white.
It is one of the few major old industrial structures downtown, and the stacks do give a sort of industrial gritty feel.
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Old August 28th, 2007, 03:46 AM   #273
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This whole area beyond the wall will be much nicer with the love me-love me not, JW Marriott in the picture..
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Old August 28th, 2007, 04:10 AM   #274
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Wow, it seems like just yesterday they announced this thing, it's goin up fast. Will it be done by next season?
BTW, I say keep the stacks and convert the factory into lofts, that is an awesome building.
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Old August 28th, 2007, 03:38 PM   #275
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Unless I'm mistaken, that building is a heating plant that is connected to virtually all buildings in downtown Indianapolis. It's not being converted into condos anytime soon, if ever.

That's not to say I don't wish they could....
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Old August 28th, 2007, 08:22 PM   #276
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Unless I'm mistaken, that building is a heating plant that is connected to virtually all buildings in downtown Indianapolis. It's not being converted into condos anytime soon, if ever.

That's not to say I don't wish they could....
it wouldent kill them to clean it up and make its street level section a little more tolerable.
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Old August 29th, 2007, 01:39 AM   #277
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Since we're on the subject of converting the stacks, I've always thought that would be a great site for a museum, especially a modern art museum.
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Old August 29th, 2007, 03:22 AM   #278
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Since we're on the subject of converting the stacks, I've always thought that would be a great site for a museum, especially a modern art museum.
I think a modern museum along the river front would be pretty awesome.
I think that if they removed the stacks and turned the old brick part into condos would be cool.
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Old August 29th, 2007, 08:54 AM   #279
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Not To Be Crazy But...

You do realize if that sweet ass plant caught on fire that would be some gnarly shit to put out... (Just one of the insane thoughts that race thru my head before bed) I do like it however. Without Indy would be SO like Columbus, Ohio. How unflattering.
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Old August 29th, 2007, 06:36 PM   #280
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You do realize if that sweet ass plant caught on fire that would be some gnarly shit to put out... (Just one of the insane thoughts that race thru my head before bed) I do like it however. Without Indy would be SO like Columbus, Ohio. How unflattering.
hmm, I'm sure they have emergency stuff for that, they wouldent take such a risk to have every structure downtown burn to the ground.
"the great Indianapolis fire!" They probably have emergency shut down even for drills, or owners downtown would be pissed.
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