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Old April 4th, 2008, 09:12 PM   #401
philaustin06
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so the letters on the side of the stadium are huge! LUC in big red letters is up on the west side, Lucas Oil is definitely getting their moneys worth.
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Old April 4th, 2008, 11:06 PM   #402
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I'm just glad that they're not plastering Lucas Oil's logo on the side of the building. That thing is super-ugly.



Whoever talked them out of that is a godsend for the city. I'm sure it will be all over the inside, which will be bad enough, but at least I won't have to look at it everyday on my way to work. The typeface they chose for the exterior signage is nice and simple. It's very conservative and classy looking.
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Old April 4th, 2008, 11:32 PM   #403
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ablerock View Post
This isn't against you IndyYeah, but I could care less. And no offense to anyone from Chicago, but they get made fun of by people in NYC for being a lesser city. It's how it goes. I'm not a backwood hick and I'm pretty sure no one else here is except the Urbanophile , but there are a lot of 'billies in this city.
What can I say? I am from Laconia, population 29. And I did live in a trailer on a gravel road. I guess I resemble that remark.
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Old April 5th, 2008, 04:19 AM   #404
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ablerock View Post
This isn't against you IndyYeah, but I could care less. And no offense to anyone from Chicago, but they get made fun of by people in NYC for being a lesser city. It's how it goes. I'm not a backwood hick and I'm pretty sure no one else here is except the Urbanophile , but there are a lot of 'billies in this city. There are a lot of them in Chicago/Illinois too. As a matter of fact, they're all over the Midwest. Probably more than 50% of the population in the Midwest is hickish. They're decent hard-working people. They may not be up on the most recent Matthew Barney film, but they're nothing to be ashamed of.

The truth is, there is a lot going on in Naptown. That's what I choose to focus on. We've got so much potential and our future looks brighter everyday. 10 years ago, there wasn't much going on downtown. Look at it now! We're not quite world-class, but give us another 10-15 years of good planning and we'll be sittin' pretty.
I understand what you say, and I switch stations alot, however I like sports, and talk radio, and That is the way it is with Indy and Chicago, and alot of these people rarely talk about their state. Chicago is the state to them, it is not a hick state, and flat farmland area cannot exist in the state of Chicago. So I change channels,hear it again, and cannot believe only boring things happen in Indiana, Iowa, and the rest of the midwest except the whole place that Chicago is. I do like the city, but I can think of many more American and European cities that are happening as much or than Chicago in the state of Illinois. Done with my soapbox, because I love Indy!
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Old April 5th, 2008, 10:45 PM   #405
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyYeah View Post
...because I love Indy!
That's the spirit!


Quote:
Originally Posted by arenn View Post
What can I say? I am from Laconia, population 29. And I did live in a trailer on a gravel road. I guess I resemble that remark.
29? That's crazy small! I spent the first few years of my life in Clermont, IN. It's about as podunk as it gets. It's out near the IRP drag strip, before Brownsburg. I don't know how I ended up going to art school and getting into design, but it happened. I think it's a lot like the techno scene in Detroit. You just see how crummy things are in your neighborhood, and hope and try to make things get better. Even if it's just the way you dress and what you eat.
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Old April 6th, 2008, 04:17 PM   #406
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I have to issue a correction on the data. I just checked the Census Bureau estimates for Laconia, and they are now saying it has 30 people. Somebody must've had a baby. Of course, I didn't live in the city, I was four miles outside of town in the suburbs.

I guess I always thought I would go off to college and leave the town, but I never thought growing up that it was a bad place. I actually still don't. While I recognize its problems and don't have a strong desire to go back there, I think it was a good place to grow up and recognize its attraction for others. When I lived there, I just never knew anything different. It was like growing up in a bubble. It only occurred to me later in life, for example, that we were ridiculously poor when I was a kid. It wasn't something that registered for me.

My brother Luke and I both left, which is unusual. Harrison County is the kind of place people don't leave, and don't want to leave. Though a few people migrated north. In addition to my brother in Indy (now Chicago), I know three people out of my graduating class of 50 who now live in Indy. I just met a guy downtown last week who also graduated from my high school, albeit in a different year.
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Old April 7th, 2008, 03:03 AM   #407
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Well all the crap Chicagoans are espouting on talk radio just means they are covering for how scared they are of da Bears getting blown out by the Colts on opening weekend.

Indy pounded da Cubs in SB XLI and the hairy mammals have fallen off the face of the earth since then while the Colts actually improved their regular season record in 2007 and are poised to challenge for the SB again in 2008.

Anyone who says that there is nothing going on in DT Indy is either: a) incredibly ignorant, b) or has never been to Indianapolis.
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Old April 8th, 2008, 04:47 PM   #408
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Delayed opening

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- The Drum Corps International World Championships is moving this summer's competition to Indiana University's Memorial Stadium because the new Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis won't be completed in time.

About 40 drum and bugle corps from around the world will participate in the three-day event, Aug. 7-9.

...

The Indianapolis Colts are scheduled to open the new stadium with a preseason game against Buffalo on Aug. 24.

...

link
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Old April 8th, 2008, 11:59 PM   #409
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Here is the full article:

Lucas Oil Stadium not ready for major summer band event

Star and news service reports

Drum Corps International is moving its World Championships to Bloomington this summer because Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis won’t be ready in time.

About 40 drum-and-bugle corps from around the world will compete at Indiana University's Memorial Stadium, Aug. 7-9. The competition is expected to draw about 35,000 people.

The Indianapolis Colts are scheduled to open the new stadium with a preseason game against Buffalo on Aug. 24. A state official involved with the construction said today that the plan was always to open the stadium in mid-August -- too late for the marching bands event.

Drum Corps International, in a statement released Friday, said it began planning the championships two years ago and knew that Lucas might not be ready by early August.

Still, the group said, it was surprised to finally learn last week through a news report that the stadium wouldn’t be available.

“We’re a bit frustrated that we were ‘scooped’ on learning of this development, as we had no direct knowledge prior to the announcement that a change of venue was imminent,” said Dan Acheson, Executive Director and CEO of Drum Corps International.

“The notification occurring in this manner was not what any of those directly involved with our World Championships events had intended.”

Dave Frick, chairman of the Indiana Stadium and Convention Building Authority, said today that Lucas Oil Stadium is on schedule to be completed Aug. 15.

"We will be done," Frick said. "We have always had the countdown clock and the clock was always set for Aug. 15. That has always been our completion date."

Frick explained that the Drum Corps International championship was to have been held at the new stadium only if the construction could be completed early. The event will still be held at Lucas Oil Stadium in 2009, he said.

Drum Corps International says it has had contingency plans to ensure a “seamless process” of moving the competition this summer.

Drum Corps International posted answers to “frequently asked questions” at its Web site, http://www.dci.org/, and said free transportation will be available for fans who booked rooms in Indy expecting the competition to be there.

“Clearly, there are many issues that we’re moving quickly to address, and we’re appreciative of our loyal fans who continue to be patient as we work to create a championship experience,” Acheson said.
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Old April 9th, 2008, 12:02 AM   #410
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Well, Indy's ****up is Bloomington's gain. Maybe the economic loss of not having the stadium ready by early August will inspire the general contractor to pull their head out of their ass and get the ******* stadium built.
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Old April 9th, 2008, 06:44 AM   #411
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Actually, if you read the article it says that the plan was always mid-August, which is too late for the Drum Corps. The stadium is 85% complete and on-time(maybe slightly ahead of schedule) and under budget. So I don't think the general contractor needs to get his head out of anything. This is nothing like the mess that was Circle Center Mall. I think we should all be applauding these contractors for a job well done, it seems like we receive such so rarely in the central city.

Can't wait to see the Speed Blue and White in action, hopefully I can get back up to Indy for the opener.

Last edited by speedblue47; April 18th, 2008 at 05:27 AM.
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Old April 16th, 2008, 04:24 PM   #412
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1st Roof Closure

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dl...rontpagecities
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Old April 16th, 2008, 07:17 PM   #413
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Newer Pics

Above is the link for the story, heres a link on that same page with a gallery of the stadium, pretty nice pics.

http://www2.indystar.com/autofocus/g.../slides/1545/1
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Old April 18th, 2008, 12:56 AM   #414
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Parking lot...

Does anyone know why they are tearing up the north parking lot of the stadium? Are they expanding South St, or are they moving it closer to the RCA Dome? Maybe South St won't even run in front of the new stadium.
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Old April 18th, 2008, 05:29 AM   #415
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I'm absolutely certain that South will run in front of the stadium. Are you talking about the parking lot that abuts the elevated tracks? My mom works right there on South so I'll ask her if she can get any info from her boss.
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Old April 18th, 2008, 05:40 PM   #416
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Quote:
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Does anyone know why they are tearing up the north parking lot of the stadium? Are they expanding South St, or are they moving it closer to the RCA Dome? Maybe South St won't even run in front of the new stadium.
I'm not sure about why they're tearing up the whole parking lot, it could be a solution to the land they lost to the bean company on the south side.

That lot was pretty haggard. The ramps, entrances, etc. are now obsolete because the RCA Dome is coming down.

Part of that lot (the east side) will be a connector to the convention center. They're probably just making it all nice again. It would not leave a good impression to walk out of the new connector seeing a an obviously long-neglected parking lot.

This is a picture of it from the ICC video:
http://www.in.gov/iscba/2490.htm

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Old April 21st, 2008, 12:37 AM   #417
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Lucas Oil Stadium from the Kentucky Ave. bridge.





I bet you could get some amazing shots of the stadium on a less hazy day. I've also got some new shots of the Lucas Oil Stadium sign up on my blog.

http://dig-b.blogspot.com/2008/04/ph...l-stadium.html
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Old April 22nd, 2008, 02:51 AM   #418
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What a shame how Indy has neglected the White River. It is so polluted and ignored by the city. It could be a wonderful asset, fostering mid/high rise development near its shores but for now it is a glorified storm water channel with unkept foliage and graffiti lining its banks.
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Old April 22nd, 2008, 07:05 AM   #419
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River Asset

Strongly Agreed. Perhaps Indy should look at White River more closely and capitalize on it's potential. Oklahoma City has, and has an article about the success of it's river in the NY Times on 4.21.08


In Oklahoma, a River Alters a City’s Course.

OKLAHOMA CITY — As the nation’s top kayakers and canoeists dipped their paddles in the Oklahoma River over the weekend while competing for a spot on the United States Olympic team, it was possible to imagine that a few city leaders had something else on their minds.

Like, take that, John Steinbeck.

Almost 70 years after Steinbeck popularized the plight of Oklahoma’s Dust Bowl refugees in “The Grapes of Wrath,” residents here still chafe at the city’s reputation as a barren place. As recently as a decade ago, the river was a scar through the city’s heart, at times a trickle of water in a ditch so overgrown it had to be mowed three times a year.

Civic leaders and politicians gambled millions that a rejuvenated river would attract investors to an economically struggling city known for its love of football and rodeo. But to the surprise of even those behind the effort, the river has spawned something else.

The city has become a mecca for elite water sports. Last fall, a crowd of 50,000 showed up for a rowing competition that drew Olympic athletes from Australia and the Czech Republic. Three local universities have begun varsity rowing programs, and a fourth is considering one.

“We completely did it by accident,” Mayor Mick Cornett said.

After a series of floods devastated the area in the 1920s, Oklahoma City and the United States Army Corps of Engineers sought to prevent future catastrophes by straightening, widening and redirecting a stretch of the North Canadian River away from the population center.

“They said, ‘That will never happen again,’ ” Mr. Cornett said. “And sure enough, they took all the water out of our river.”

Talk of bringing the river back persisted for decades, especially as civic leaders and planners searched for ways to turn the city around after the oil bust of the 1980s left the local economy reeling. In 1993, taxpayers narrowly approved a sales tax dedicated to an ambitious redevelopment, including the creation of a ballpark, an arena, a library and a trolley system. The tax also included money for the river.

In 1999, engineers began erecting a series of dams and locks that transformed the ditch into a bona fide waterway. Along with the Corps of Engineers, the city planted thousands of trees and added wetlands and walking trails along the banks.

By the time the corridor opened to the public in December 2004, the city and the federal government had spent a combined $54 million. State legislators renamed a seven-mile stretch the Oklahoma River, and private investors built a futuristic boathouse.

The city has since attracted an estimated $700 million in new development. A Dell office complex is on the riverfront, and a multimillion-dollar American Indian Cultural Center is under construction.

Renaming the river was the idea of Ray Ackerman, an advertising executive from Oklahoma City who said he cringed whenever he flew over the ditch on his way home. Mr. Ackerman argued that the name North Canadian River would confuse out-of-towners, but the change drew grumbles from many longtime residents who worried history was being erased.

People like Mr. Ackerman saw economic opportunity in the river. Mike Knopp’s view was more elemental — the newly filled waterway could now float a boat. Mr. Knopp, a rowing enthusiast, looked at one 2,000-meter stretch that was perfectly straight and realized the Army Corps of Engineers had unwittingly created an ideal location for a boat race.

“It’s very spectator-friendly,” he said. “And that is pretty unique, to have an urban venue like this.”

In 1998, Mr. Knopp invited Pat Downes, a consultant to the Oklahoma City Riverfront Redevelopment Authority, to a regatta on a nearby lake. It was a cold, rainy day, Mr. Downes recalled, but he saw opportunity. “The sight of those long, graceful rowing shells on a body of water is truly a remarkable sight,” he said.

The river’s potential as a sporting site has become an integral part of city leaders’ dreams for the future. Of course, the city continues to pursue other sports projects. Last week, for example, N.B.A. owners approved the relocation of the Seattle Supersonics to Oklahoma City. Still, little has captured the community’s imagination more than boating.

Mr. Knopp quit his job as a lawyer and became the head rowing coach at Oklahoma City University, one of the three local universities that offer rowing as a varsity sport with athletic scholarships.With the help of corporate donors, like the locally based Chesapeake Energy Corporation, Mr. Knopp set about building a state-of-the-art boathouse. It filled almost immediately after opening in 2006.

Jim Abbott, the athletic director of Oklahoma City University, said he was skeptical when Mr. Knopp approached the institution.

“This is Oklahoma — we’re football, we’re rodeo,” he said. “So rowing five years ago was nowhere on the minds of the average Oklahoman.”

But he quickly saw the benefits. Since September 2003, when the team began, 70 athletes have enrolled at the university because of the rowing program.

“The four largest events in the history of our university are the four regattas that we’ve hosted,” Mr. Abbott said. Those events now draw the nation’s top rowing teams, including Harvard, and attendance has quintupled since the first regatta was held in 2004, Mr. Abbott said.

The sport’s popularity has grown so fast that the three university teams are planning to build boathouses along the river, and another university is considering erecting a fourth. There is even talk of constructing a white-water course near the new boathouses.

Kayakers at the weekend Olympic trials, which drew between 10,000 and 15,000 spectators, said they had heard about Oklahoma City through their friends in rowing. Aside from some concerns about the city’s ferocious winds, the athletes said they were pleased.

“I think they’ve definitely proven that they can provide a solid race course and event,” said Carrie Johnson, who earned a spot on the Olympic team in the 500-meter single kayak event on Friday.

Ms. Johnson was the only athlete over the weekend to be definitively selected for the United States team; the rest will be selected after races in Montreal and Szeged, Hungary.

“The actual boathouse is one of the best that I’ve seen,” she said.

The Oklahoma River has also won over Norman Bellingham, the chief operating officer of the United States Olympic Committee and a gold medalist in kayaking.

“I was a little bit in disbelief,” he said, recalling his initial reaction to rowing in Oklahoma City. “I had to come out and see it myself.”

Then, at the USA Rowing World Challenge held in Oklahoma City last October, Mr. Bellingham spotted a top competitor from New Zealand. He said he knew the site had been accepted.

Perhaps the best test, he said, was that he got few questions when he told people where the Olympic trials were being held. In the boating world, “it seems like a very natural, logical statement to make,” he said. “You don’t get that second look like, did I hear that correctly
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Old April 22nd, 2008, 04:17 PM   #420
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Most cities used their rivers for industrial or waste disposal purposes. It is easy today to say it shouldn't have been done. But 50, 100 years ago, maybe it was the right answer. The challenge is to reorient urban rivers now that the previous uses are largely obsolete and/or significantly cleaner.
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