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Old August 8th, 2008, 11:59 AM   #501
philaustin06
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a whole gang of new renderings of the new stadium at the lucas oil stadium website. do you guys really think they'll put the pictures on the outside of the stadium like that by the windows?? it would def add some color to the building.
http://www.lucasoilstadium.com/Visit...Photo_Gallery/
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Old August 8th, 2008, 05:08 PM   #502
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Does anyone know if the Luke will offer views of the field from the concourses? I know the remodeled Soldier Field does, and was wondering if this was a feature of the Luke. It's great to still see the field when going for a beer/pretzel/restroom and certainly adds to the experience.
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Old August 8th, 2008, 10:34 PM   #503
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I like how they'll be able to set it up for basketball so that the seats come in evenly from all sides, versus having to put the court perpendicularly to the field and have temporary stands set up, but only using about half of the bowl, like they do in many dome stadiums for basketball.
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Old August 9th, 2008, 02:36 AM   #504
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwilson758 View Post
Does anyone know if the Luke will offer views of the field from the concourses? I know the remodeled Soldier Field does, and was wondering if this was a feature of the Luke. It's great to still see the field when going for a beer/pretzel/restroom and certainly adds to the experience.
Yes, on some levels, but I'm not sure if every level. I do know they will have a massive amount of HD screens and surround sound around the stadium. Even outside in the tailgate sections.
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Old August 9th, 2008, 04:17 AM   #505
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All I know is that the stadium is absolutely huge. I could go for a nicer asthetic look, but it is still nice outside to look at.
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Old August 9th, 2008, 04:26 AM   #506
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My photo:
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Old August 9th, 2008, 04:38 AM   #507
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My only small problem is the front angles. Seen them before, but all in all a nice looking place. Inside seems to be the real deal!
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Old August 11th, 2008, 04:28 AM   #508
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Looks like I should have bid on the website construction. The inept designers they hired didn't even make sure that the z-index for the pop-up menus would allow them to be seen over the banner rendering under the navigation bar. That is sad considering how much they probably got paid.
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Old August 11th, 2008, 07:13 PM   #509
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Indy Star Article - Under Review: A critique of Lucas Oil Stadium

Under review: A critique of Lucas Oil Stadium
Stadium captures Indy's conservative character and reflects its architectural history, critic says.

By Lawrence Cheek / Star correspondent

Enemies of modern architecture will note with satisfaction that Lucas Oil Stadium, which at first glance resembles a 19th-century factory on steroids, is by every imaginable measurement a better building than the much more progressive-looking RCA Dome it's replacing.

The dome is typical American stadium-arena blobitecture -- amorphous, anonymous, disposable. It says nothing about the city surrounding it and offers no welcoming gesture to anyone approaching it. It could be a textbook lesson in modernism's failure.

The fascinating question swirling around the stadium as it prepares for its opening, then, is: How have we advanced the art of architecture by looking backward? Or has Indianapolis just lost yardage on a $720 million play?

We can start by looking into the architect's mind at the outset.

Bryan Trubey, the lead designer for Dallas-based HKS, has nothing in his portfolio that clues us in to his personal predilections. His new stadium for the Dallas Cowboys looks like the offspring of a starship and a titanic mussel, but HKS' Lone Star Park, a Texas horse track, is unabashed Spanish Mission revivalism. On the progressive-architecture continuum, Lucas Oil Stadium lodges somewhere in between.

Trubey radiates no starchitect ego, and he sees his role as serving the community where he's working rather than using it as his stage. "This isn't about Trubey's personal brand of architecture," he says. "I've never felt comfortable in creating an expression that's personal to me, then replicating it over and over. It's far more interesting and appropriate to create something completely unique to its time and place. That's a richer field to mine than one's personal experience."

Trubey clearly mined Indianapolis' architecture history for the stadium's textures and themes, and not just Hinkle Fieldhouse, the obvious antecedent. Look at St. John Catholic Church, the 1871 Gothic Revival church a couple of blocks north of the stadium: Its arches, limestone-beveled buttresses and shoulderlike bays flanking the nave all resonate in the stadium.

Deeper than this, he understood the vast difference between the iconography of a stadium for the Cowboys -- an international brand in a city brimming with swagger and audacity -- and a multipurpose civic symbol for Indianapolis. He chooses his words with apparent care and precision: "I think this building links to the broader culture of the area in a way that a modernist building would struggle to."

Mostly good calls

It's impossible to know before the opening how well it's going to function as an NFL stadium, a giant NCAA arena or an extension of the Indiana Convention Center. But a great deal of the value, or detriment, of a building lies in how it makes us feel, and we can certainly talk about Lucas Oil Stadium in this light.

The first smart decision the architects made was to skew the stadium 24.4 degrees off the north-south street alignment. The reason was to line up the Downtown skyline in the vast north window, but there's actually a more valuable benefit: The colossal visual heft of the building as you walk or drive by is lightened because your perspective on it constantly changes. It seems less oppressive, and oppression is always a prime hazard in a building so far outside human scale.

HKS also deployed the full architectural playbook of schemes to break down the forbidding scale of the exterior walls, starting with the brick cladding. However big the building, a single brick is a basic element we can all relate to -- it's scaled for the human hand, and we've all held them. A precast concrete wall, in contrast, always introduces a degree of alienation.

The walls are articulated so busily that they're almost fussy. The portal arches are outlined with double rows of radiating bricks, the buttresses step back toward the walls as they climb, and the corners turn in a sequence of vertical accordion folds that help the whole composition feel less like a shoebox. Limestone cornices nicely trim all the pieces. Access ramps, which at this scale can dominate the architecture, are tucked away inside.

Study it closely, in fact, and the hulking-factory image dissolves, and it begins to seem as exquisitely detailed and proportioned as a Beaux-Arts city hall.

There are some problems. Study the north elevation closely, and you'll see that the colors in the pre-assembled brick panels don't quite match. (The bricks were laid offsite into forms of about 12 by 20 feet, then hoisted into place.) On the south entrance, the architects missed an opportunity to create a sudden sizzle of intimacy inside the arches, which are only about 6 feet deep. If the arches had punched into the lobbies another 10 feet, they would have offered a richer spatial experience in passing from open plaza into the vast indoor spaces.

One huge aesthetic debit is the "Lucas Oil Stadium" logo -- chunky, clunky and so overpowering that it tries to suck the energy out of the intimate architectural details. Not the architects' fault, obviously.

Inside, you're immediately nailed by the sheer power of vast, enclosed space. It's 295 feet from playing field to roof peak, 846 feet from one end zone window to the other. We get an instinctive rush when we confront such a vast indoor space, because we're seeing that our not-so-humble species has the power to create worlds. Architecture moves us when it suggests that we've surpassed our old limitations, whether in imagination or technology.

The most dynamic architectural detail inside is the structure itself -- the exposed bones of the four steel "superframes" at the corners that support the arched roof trusses. Their complexity is a thing of beauty in itself, and the fact that it's not only exposed but so close at hand -- you can nuzzle right up to the beefy I-beams as you walk through the top concourses -- is a way of humanizing the vastness. We feel more comfortable when we can see how something's put together.

HKS also has created a remarkably versatile world. It's the only three-tenant stadium in the country, which helps to justify its prodigious price tag and environmental footprint. The opening panes in the north window also enlarge the range of our sensual responses to the space. Peel back the roof and fling open the windows, and we're parked in the world's largest convertible.

While we're parked, let's ponder that thorny question posed earlier, the one about the art of architecture.

A building to treasure

For better or worse, we're into a century in which building technology makes possible virtually anything that an architect's imagination can hatch. Denver now has an art museum that looks like a pile of titanium pterodactyl beaks, London an office building in the form of a 40-story gherkin, and Beijing an Olympic stadium that suggests a giant bird's nest.

These buildings are both brilliant and ridiculous, inspirational and outrageously conceited. These contradictions are what make them interesting: They're windows into dimensions beyond the traditional values of architecture.

As a civic icon, Lucas Oil Stadium successfully evokes several things: Indy's architectural heritage and essential cultural conservatism, as a foundation. It also projects an image of immense brawn with an underlying matrix of elegance in its proportions and attention to strategic detail. Interesting, because this is how football's ardent advocates might well describe the game.

But what about improvisation and brutality, which are just as fundamental to football? What about the inspiration of the region's alternative architecture history, the one that produced Columbus' collection of 20th-century modernism?

It's tantalizing to imagine a civic icon exploding with such complexities and contradictions, but we'd better imagine a stadium's practical failure along with them. The inescapable truth is that radical buildings seldom work very well.

The art in this stadium may be in the architects' willingness to defy the ethic of it-could-be-anywhere modernism that produced the RCA Dome and try to make a building that Indianapolis will treasure.

Stadiums and arenas tumble into obsolescence with preposterous rapidity today, and if one is going to last, it had better be loved. This one has a chance.
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Old August 11th, 2008, 07:28 PM   #510
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I don't see how the RCA dome was progressive. It clearly didn't prove to be progressive as many people found it to be rather ugly(within my experiences.).
The LOS will be able to stand the test of time and Indianapolis culture much longer than the RCA dome did.
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Old August 11th, 2008, 10:21 PM   #511
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RCA Dome progressive? It was built on a shoestring budget, without a team, and no forethought.

Who is Lawrence Cheek? Never heard of him and when I got to:

The first smart decision the architects made was to skew the stadium 24.4 degrees off the north-south street alignment. The reason was to line up the Downtown skyline in the vast north window, but there's actually a more valuable benefit: The colossal visual heft of the building as you walk or drive by is lightened because your perspective on it constantly changes. It seems less oppressive, and oppression is always a prime hazard in a building so far outside human scale."

I laughed. This is the WORST aspect of this impressive building. I understand wanting "money" shots, but buildings would have still been visible (the new JW and of course, AUL, Key, etc) and the structure wouldn't look so awkward when driving on I-70.
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Old August 11th, 2008, 10:56 PM   #512
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Lawrence Cheek is the architecture critic of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. The Star doesn't have an architecture critic, so whenever they want to review a major civic structure, they bring in Cheek. He's also reviewed the library (which he loved) and the IMA expansion (which he thought was functional but unambitious)
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Old August 12th, 2008, 12:02 AM   #513
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Except for some final landscaping and cleanup, the Barn is now officially complete.
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Old August 12th, 2008, 12:07 AM   #514
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I agree with Cheek on the aspect of turning the building slightly. By turning it - you get to have part of the massive building up close to the streets - but don't have to have either a) all of the building right next to the roadway for 1000 feet as you drive next to it (if it were built right up close to the street) - or b) a building sitting away from the roadway - with its side paralleling the roadway - but 70 - 100 feet away, which would kill some of the urban streetlife feel of having the building near you. By angling it, you get part of the building right next to you at times, so you can enjoy its massiveness and the detail of the architecture - but you also can get a view of more of the building as it slants away from the street. This is the way the building can be seen from all three roadways that are next to it: South Street, Capitol Avenue and Missouri Avenue. The landscaping they have been putting in over the past few days is helping to make the massive structure seem much more pedestrian friendly too. The angling helps provide some decent public spaces as well - with a bit more character than would have been provided with what otherwise would have likely been very rectangular plazas. I'm glad they're starting to take down all the fencing that had been surrounding it. Soon we will be able to get over there on our bikes and ride around it and get a real close-up view. I'll probably go down there this weekend and see if I can find a ticket for the tours. If not, I may be buying one to go to one of the high school games they have planned there in the following week - just to roam around the building.
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Old August 12th, 2008, 12:10 AM   #515
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I know I've said this before, but architecturally speaking I don't care much for LOS. Oddly enough, it's one of those projects that seems to work only here so it fits in well with the local vernacular. That doesn't automatically make it good though, as the critic was trying to imply in the article.

The angling of the building makes absolutely NO sense from a functional standpoint, the interior seating capacity is small for a newer stadium and the designers went a bit overboard with the old school fieldhouse/gymnasium theme. At the end of the day, it's a football stadium and that will be its primary use (then conventions, and then basketball).

All of that having been said, I still can't wait to get my ass in there this weekend for the tour.
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Old August 12th, 2008, 12:35 AM   #516
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NaptownBoy View Post
At the end of the day, it's a football stadium and that will be its primary use (then conventions, and then basketball).
Its greatest exposure may come through football, but there will be, what, 15 to 20 games played there per year? In terms of day-uses, I'm sure conventions and "other" will be much higher. LOS's versatility is hugely important.
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Old August 12th, 2008, 04:51 AM   #517
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He is kinda funny however, and somewhat on-line. I was trying to be real nice with respects to Indianas past. I am interested in the inside, but I think they could have done more outside. Least he has some humor!
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Old August 12th, 2008, 04:29 PM   #518
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I like it. It does represent a piece of the region's historical character.

What may be more important then the LOS is what is developed around it and how that future development interacts with this building. It will be very important for the surrounding buildings to be placed and scaled in a way that encompasses LOS and makes the entire area work and function together.
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Old August 12th, 2008, 11:45 PM   #519
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NaptownBoy View Post
. Oddly enough, it's one of those projects that seems to work only here so it fits in well with the local vernacular.

.
Isn't that what we want?
Everyone is building funky stadiums but Indianapolis is building something that may not be a roman temple but it still seems to scream "I'm here for good!" and at the least is a structure that local buildings can relate to.
We want something to scream Indianapolis and whether we like it or not Indianapolis isn't as popular for contemporary architecture as many cities in this nation are. We want to look like the city of Indianapolis! A city of rich history and a bright future! So I find this structure to fit Indianapolis quiet well. This is Indianapolis not Beijing after all.
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Old August 13th, 2008, 12:08 AM   #520
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Of course we want it to work here, and that's why it was built here and not in say, Seattle. My point was that just because a building fits with the surrounding context does not automatically make it good.
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