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Old March 5th, 2007, 03:59 AM   #41
eweezerinc
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Tailgating in a parking garage.... never done that. Might be fun, but only the top level could have grills, probly, which sucks.
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Old March 6th, 2007, 05:26 PM   #42
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The majority of the parking is surface lot. The parking garage is only being constructed because a small bean factory at the SE corner of the site refused to move.
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Old March 6th, 2007, 06:28 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwilson758 View Post
The majority of the parking is surface lot. The parking garage is only being constructed because a small bean factory at the SE corner of the site refused to move.
Hehehehe, that's one way to put it! Another way would be to say that the building authority refused to give Hurst a reasonable buy-out so that they could move. I don't know who's right or wrong on this issue (or if there even is a right or wrong) but in the face of little evidence, I'm going to side with the little guy.
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Old March 7th, 2007, 08:45 AM   #44
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Letter to Regional Center Plan Organization

I sent the following e-mail message to the Regional Center Plan Organization many months ago and thought many of you frequenting this site might appreciate...

Being an avid supporter of the Regional Center Plan, I whole-heartedly believe in the great work being done to improve/develop urban design standards in Indianapolis. But I have to ask how one of the largest PUBLIC projects in the city’s history (Indiana Stadium) adheres to basically none of the recommendations detailed in the Plan?


Taking into account the overall positioning/design of the stadium would be better suited in the middle of a corn field rather than an urban setting, it appears Indiana Stadium Authority is veering even further away from suggested design standards and trying to use eminent domain tactics to seize control of the historic N.K. Hurst Bean Factory (“Suit to seize land offends lawmakers “ – Indianapolis Star 12/31) in order to build additional surface parking. Even if the Hurst Company decided to sell, why would the Authority choose to tear down a beautiful old structure which reflects the areas history and has potential to be a perfect adaptive-reuse project? The building could be converted into residential lofts/retail and contribute to the appeal of the area, while providing additional tax revenue for the City. It appears the design standards (or lack there of) being implemented by the Stadium Authority is in direct opposition to the urban design standards of the Regional Center Plan? Does the Regional Center Plan have any real relevance when actual projects are on the table?


Even if the Authority chooses not to adhere to suggested design principals, isn’t this an opportunity for the City (who supposedly backs the Regional Center Plan) to show their commitment to the Plan and, at the least, relax the parking ordinance. This is a perfect example of why people in Indianapolis do not use public transit – we make it too easy and convenient to drive your own automobile. I am positive that even with less parking availability, people will still find a way to get to frequent events held at the stadium (they might even start using IndyGo!).


Concerned citizen
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Old March 7th, 2007, 05:30 PM   #45
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Great letter. Did you ever get a response?
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Old March 7th, 2007, 05:46 PM   #46
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Well, if its dominatly surface lots I dont see downtown expanding southward anytime soon.
BTW, great letter, hopefully you get an intellegent response.
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Old March 7th, 2007, 05:57 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k2h View Post
I sent the following e-mail message to the Regional Center Plan Organization many months ago and thought many of you frequenting this site might appreciate...

Being an avid supporter of the Regional Center Plan, I whole-heartedly believe in the great work being done to improve/develop urban design standards in Indianapolis. But I have to ask how one of the largest PUBLIC projects in the city’s history (Indiana Stadium) adheres to basically none of the recommendations detailed in the Plan?


Taking into account the overall positioning/design of the stadium would be better suited in the middle of a corn field rather than an urban setting, it appears Indiana Stadium Authority is veering even further away from suggested design standards and trying to use eminent domain tactics to seize control of the historic N.K. Hurst Bean Factory (“Suit to seize land offends lawmakers “ – Indianapolis Star 12/31) in order to build additional surface parking. Even if the Hurst Company decided to sell, why would the Authority choose to tear down a beautiful old structure which reflects the areas history and has potential to be a perfect adaptive-reuse project? The building could be converted into residential lofts/retail and contribute to the appeal of the area, while providing additional tax revenue for the City. It appears the design standards (or lack there of) being implemented by the Stadium Authority is in direct opposition to the urban design standards of the Regional Center Plan? Does the Regional Center Plan have any real relevance when actual projects are on the table?


Even if the Authority chooses not to adhere to suggested design principals, isn’t this an opportunity for the City (who supposedly backs the Regional Center Plan) to show their commitment to the Plan and, at the least, relax the parking ordinance. This is a perfect example of why people in Indianapolis do not use public transit – we make it too easy and convenient to drive your own automobile. I am positive that even with less parking availability, people will still find a way to get to frequent events held at the stadium (they might even start using IndyGo!).


Concerned citizen
The large number of parking spaces around the Lucas Stadium are NOT being developed because of some rigid interpretation of the parking requirement ordinance. Rather, the number of parking spaces are contractually obligated by the city's legal agreement with the Colts. In fact, the city has to pay the Colts a certain amount of money for every space it falls short of the agreed upon number.

In any event, I do agree with the sentiment of your letter.
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Old March 7th, 2007, 06:57 PM   #48
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No Response

Unfortunately, I did not receive a response to the letter.
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Old March 11th, 2007, 08:52 AM   #49
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This is a very impressive stadium
























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Old March 11th, 2007, 05:36 PM   #50
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Stadium ignites a land blitz
Older businesses on southern edge of Downtown could make millions of dollars from eager developers


A trendy development with hundreds of condos and a dozen restaurants. A cluster of new hotels. Retail shops. Parking garages.



Developers are jockeying to build those and other projects in the shadow of Lucas Oil Stadium, which is a year and a half from completion, driving up land prices over $1 million per half-acre lot in an area long seen as Downtown's doormat.
The new developments stand to displace old-line industrial companies in the area that have operated quietly for decades and now stand to reap millions of dollars by selling out.
"This real estate around here'll be gold-plated. We'll make a fortune," said Del Cambridge, whose Cambridge Transmissions shop on Missouri Street is lucratively aligned with the 50-yard line in the stadium.
Cambridge, who said he once carried a gun for protection when he moved his shop into the area 40 years ago, talks of being approached so far by about eight prospective buyers interested in the half-acre lot that includes his 1936 building.
"I've had some nice offers. It's getting pretty hot," he said.
The nonprofit group behind the most ambitious of the stadium-spurred plans, called Meridian International Village, sees a radical remaking of the neighborhood.
"The Near Southside is being re-established as a major focus of economic and development opportunities. We're extremely excited about it," said Mark Flanary, executive director of Concord Community Development Corp.
Concord is seeking developers to build midrises along South Meridian Street that would contain 300 to 400 condos and six to 12 ethnic restaurants.
The community group models its Meridian International Village project on Wrigleyville, the thriving commercial area around Wrigley Field in Chicago, home of the Chicago Cubs."We look at ourselves as kind of the next frontier. Lucas Oil is going to be the catalyst," Flanary said.
Although land prices in the area have jumped from a few years ago -- and figure to go higher still as the stadium's August 2008 opening nears -- it's hard for brokers or landowners to put price tags on what's become some of the most coveted real estate in the city.
Valuations are tough to come by because there are few recent property sales on the books to cite as a guide.
And no one is sure where the hottest, most desirable spots for development will be.
Land flanking the stadium to the west, along Missouri Street, seems a sure bet for redevelopment. There's also opportunity along McCarty Street to the south, where the stadium's entrance plaza will be. Stadium-spurred development also could hopscotch two or three blocks to the east or south, where pubs, restaurants or housing could do double-duty catering to employees of pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly and Co. and its corporate campus.
Jeff Law, vice president of Acme Building, said his company paid more than $1 million for a half-acre lot that includes a 97-year-old, two-story building at 423 W. South St.
Plans call for a building as tall as eight stories that would contain 30 apartments or condos and ground-floor retail space, Law said.
"We just think the location is premier," he said. "We pursued it pretty hard, and we were fortunate enough to get it."
Asking prices for land have shot so high that the state-run Indiana Stadium and Convention Building Authority, which is building the stadium, hasn't been able to assemble enough land to build a giant parking garage or surface lots next to the stadium, said Executive Director John P. Klipsch.
"People we talked to around the stadium have high expectations about what their land's worth," he said.
Being priced out of the market may force the authority to partner with a private developer to build its garage, estimated to cost $25 million, Klipsch said. Or the authority could try to renegotiate its agreement with the Colts in order to put parking farther away, he said.
As part of the deal with the Colts, the state must provide 3,000 parking spaces next to the stadium. But the state's inability to buy out the N.K. Hurst Co. bean factory, which negotiated the right to stay put on land slated to become part of the stadium parking lot, has left the state 1,000 spaces short.
Asked how much the state is willing to pay for land, Klipsch said, "I'm not going to tell you."
The land plays have at times pitted neighbor against neighbor and caused otherwise friendly and open fellow property owners to become "tight-lipped," Cambridge said.
Greg Basey, owner of Basey's Downtown Grill & Spirits just west of the stadium, said he recently saw the owner of a nearby business enter the tavern with two businessmen in tow. Basey followed the new policy of discretion in the neighborhood and didn't ask what the meeting was about.
As for his interests, Basey is clear that he's out to make the most of his enviable location.
He's remodeled his rectangular building to add several dozen seats inside and built an outdoor patio to accommodate fair-weather crowds, including corporate parties during Colts home games.
Basey, who said he bought out his relatives' share of the tavern for $145,000 after his father died about seven years ago, now has a considerably higher asking price for the block structure and its half-dozen or so parking spaces.
"I wouldn't take less than $2.5 million for it," said the 42-year-old tavern owner. "When I pull up some days, I look over there and say, 'God, what did I do to deserve this stadium in my backyard?' "
Maury Plambeck, director of the city's Department of Metropolitan Development, said that while restaurants and other entertainment-oriented businesses will be naturally drawn to the stadium, city planners prefer a range of uses, with newcomers and current industrial tenants cheek by jowl.
"We believe they can all work together. Mixed use adds vitality to a Downtown," he said.
And although some new users are falling over themselves to buy their way into the area, urban redevelopment is typically a drawn-out affair, Plambeck said.
"It could take 20 years to change it in a dramatic fashion," he said of the neighborhood.
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Old March 11th, 2007, 05:43 PM   #51
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Thats great news, I hope they can save what older buildings are extant in that area. This is very good news for the city. Hopefully this idea of development will spread.
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Old March 13th, 2007, 11:26 PM   #52
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Old March 21st, 2007, 02:47 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moochie View Post
Wow.. it looks like they're almost done with the West side steel truss. I suppose that when they're done they'll move like crazy on the East side.. It's so cool watching this thing go up.

It really does look shorter than the early renders. I think it's actually and improvement too. It did look a bit top heavy imho.
I can actually see the trusses from the gerbil tube I take from my parking garage to my building each day. I agree, very cool watching this thing go up.

Also, local NBC news had a piece on the construction project yesterday. They said the current tops of the trusses are about 10-15' short of the final stadium height.
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Old March 31st, 2007, 03:33 PM   #54
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Thanks to an accident on 465, I had to detour onto I-65 this past Monday after work, and then take 70 westbound to get home. I was shocked at how far along 'The Luke' was from the last time I saw it. I can't wait to see the finished product.
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Old April 10th, 2007, 05:15 PM   #55
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What are we calling this?

I've seen the new stadium shorthanded as "LOS" - I personally don't care for the name "Lucas Oil Stadium" and have a problem with public financing of a giant billboard in the center of the city.

What do you think about calling it by its official, clunky name?

If we call it "LOS", how do we say it? By its letters? L-O-S; or as a word, like in "Los Angeles"?

Is there a funkier, more Indy-centric nickname we could give it?

My :twocents: I think the design is too retro-nostalgic - how about

"The Steel Barn"
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Old April 10th, 2007, 05:21 PM   #56
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There's a short piece about the stadium in Hunt Construction's Landmarks Newsletter for Winter 2007:

http://www.huntconstructiongroup.com...marks_0701.pdf
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Old April 10th, 2007, 05:27 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjfjapan View Post
I've seen the new stadium shorthanded as "LOS" - I personally don't care for the name "Lucas Oil Stadium" and have a problem with public financing of a giant billboard in the center of the city.

What do you think about calling it by its official, clunky name?

If we call it "LOS", how do we say it? By its letters? L-O-S; or as a word, like in "Los Angeles"?

Is there a funkier, more Indy-centric nickname we could give it?

My :twocents: I think the design is too retro-nostalgic - how about

"The Steel Barn"

I think for a retro design their pulling it off pretty well,
but, I dont like the name either, its kinda stupid, why dont we just call it the "stadium"?
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Old April 10th, 2007, 05:30 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjfjapan View Post
I've seen the new stadium shorthanded as "LOS" - I personally don't care for the name "Lucas Oil Stadium" and have a problem with public financing of a giant billboard in the center of the city.

What do you think about calling it by its official, clunky name?

If we call it "LOS", how do we say it? By its letters? L-O-S; or as a word, like in "Los Angeles"?

Is there a funkier, more Indy-centric nickname we could give it?

My :twocents: I think the design is too retro-nostalgic - how about

"The Steel Barn"
I don't know, I never really gave it much thought. I just refer to it as the "new" dome and the RCA Dome as the old dome, although it isn't really a dome at all.
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Old April 10th, 2007, 07:38 PM   #59
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Yes, Indy planned ahead and is hoping to lure some early rounds of the World Cup to the Circle City. This would further enhance the City's international profile (Indy 500 and US Grand Prix are events that every City would love to host).
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Old April 10th, 2007, 08:23 PM   #60
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Retro doesn't have to be bad. Not everything good has to be modern. Conseco Fieldhouse is superb, for example. The designs for LOS look pretty good, as does the stadium to date. The major flaw in the LOS design vs. Conseco is that LOS is skewed on its site and does not respect the city street grid. It will also be surrounded by oceans of surface parking, which Conseco is not. Fortunately, parking lots can be filled in later.
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