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Old August 1st, 2007, 07:45 AM   #1941
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Yeah I agree with ya LC80

Both these buildings are awesome,and have their own awesome identity,but together they look cluttered. It sort of starting to get that Lower Manhattan look,and I'm sure they have their reasons for building them together like that.(the location for the SWFC). But for example, look at the ESB,it stands alone and looks like its the tallest building ever. But I guess you have to go where the land is available.

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Old August 1st, 2007, 07:56 AM   #1942
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OMG !!!! what a beauty !!!! great pics
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Old August 1st, 2007, 09:04 AM   #1943
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flickr, shot taken august 1st by sakura love

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Old August 1st, 2007, 09:20 AM   #1944
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WOW! That's RADDEST Shanghai picture even I seen! Keep it up!
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Old August 1st, 2007, 12:15 PM   #1945
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It is delightful!!!
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Old August 1st, 2007, 03:59 PM   #1946
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flickr, shot taken august 1st by sakura love

Look like picture!! Yellow with black is cool
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Old August 1st, 2007, 04:14 PM   #1947
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Questioning the Middle Kingdom - Japanese companies in China
28 July 2007
The Economist

WHEN China's tallest skyscraper is completed next spring it will symbolise both the country's economic might and the importance of its ties with Japan. Over a decade in the making, the 101-storey Shanghai World Financial Centre is being built by Mori, a Japanese developer. The $1.1 billion construction project is perhaps the most visible sign of how deeply rooted Japanese firms are in China. They were among the first to move in when China opened its doors 30 years ago. Today Japan is the third-biggest source of foreign direct investment after Hong Kong and the Virgin Islands, a tax haven. Mainland China recently surpassed America as Japan's largest trading partner.

But the appeal of China as a manufacturing hub and a huge new market is not universally shared among Japanese businesses. Some companies are moving operations to other countries instead, and others are keeping business back home. Japanese companies poured $4.5 billion into China in 2006—a 30% drop from the $6.5 billion invested in 2005, according to China's Ministry of Commerce.

Japanese electronics firms all have operations in China, for example, but mostly for low-end assembly work rather than high-end production. The reason has little to do with protecting the jobs of Japanese workers (most of whom are actually part-time staff who lack the generous perks provided to full-timers). Instead, it is to prevent intellectual-property theft and boost innovation by keeping development and manufacturing close together—at home.

As competitiveness increasingly comes from manufacturing efficiency and more intellectual property is applied to the production process, it makes sense to keep operations at home. Besides, sophisticated manufacturing tends to be less labour-intensive, reducing the appeal of low-wage countries. And regional governments are offering generous incentives for firms to open new factories in Japan.

Ricoh, an office-equipment company, makes low-tech parts in China but keeps advanced technology in Japan. This month Canon said it would build a $450m optical-sensor factory in Japan. Sharp's sophisticated LCD flat-panel televisions are made at two factories in central Japan, and the company will announce plans for a new factory in Japan this summer.

As for carmakers, Toyota, Honda and Nissan have built big factories in Guangzhou to build vehicles for Chinese customers. But because of the weak yen, which makes exports cheaper, car firms are building more vehicles at home. Honda is even opening a new factory in Japan, its first in almost 30 years, despite falling domestic sales. Likewise, Toyota says it plans to build more cars in Japan for export.

Even for Japanese firms that are investing overseas, surveys show a shift away from China in favour of other Asian countries. In 2004 around 86% of Japanese firms planned to expand in China; last year the figure dropped to 77%, and 2% said they were actually scaling back their Chinese operations. In another survey, which asked Japanese firms to rate which countries they regarded as the best places to invest in the next three years, the proportion opting for China dropped from 91% in 2004 to 77% last year, while the appeal of Vietnam and India rose substantially (see chart). This is partly because China has become expensive compared with elsewhere in Asia. There is also concern over anti-Japanese sentiment.

Yet part of the problem for Japanese firms is that their business practices do not work well in China. Managers are invariably Japanese and are promoted on the basis of seniority rather than merit, so prospects for local staff are poor. (Chinese executives joke that if you want to learn about communism, work for a Japanese firm.) Worse, Japanese companies are used to dealing with a few long-standing partners. Mori's Yoshimitsu Isoi says his firm found it hard to put everything into a written contract in China, rather than relying on verbal agreements as in Japan.

As for the Shanghai building itself, a giant circular opening at the top had to be changed to a rectangle in 2005 after the Chinese public objected that it looked like the rising sun of Japan's imperial flag. The reality, however, is that Japanese firms are starting to look elsewhere.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 04:52 PM   #1948
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Questioning the Middle Kingdom - Japanese companies in China
28 July 2007
The Economist

Today Japan is the third-biggest source of foreign direct investment after Hong Kong and the Virgin Islands, a tax haven. Mainland China recently surpassed America as Japan's largest trading partner.
hehe, china articficially boosts its own fdi figures. chinese state-owned companies use subsidiary shell companies in hong kong to invest in china, which means that really china is china's biggest foreign investor. you gotta love em for that

anyway, the future success of china will be interesting. it will be an epic battle between china itself (success), and the chinese communist party (failure). anyway, let us for now enjoy the construction of this fabulous building in shanghai.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 05:41 PM   #1949
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^ well...investment is still investment, it doesn't matter where they come from...and hk and taiwan are kind of self administered...i don't think china has any choice to put them in whatever category they want.

and why are you so sure of the govt failure thing...because in china no one really cares about govt this govt that....sometimes i wish i had lived in china all my life so i don't have to encounter all those "typical" stupid comments you read about everywhere. no offence.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 06:13 PM   #1950
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Questioning the Middle Kingdom - Japanese companies in China
28 July 2007
The Economist

WHEN China's tallest skyscraper is completed next spring it will symbolise both the country's economic might and the importance of its ties with Japan. Over a decade in the making, the 101-storey Shanghai World Financial Centre is being built by Mori, a Japanese developer. The $1.1 billion construction project is perhaps the most visible sign of how deeply rooted Japanese firms are in China. They were among the first to move in when China opened its doors 30 years ago. Today Japan is the third-biggest source of foreign direct investment after Hong Kong and the Virgin Islands, a tax haven. Mainland China recently surpassed America as Japan's largest trading partner.

But the appeal of China as a manufacturing hub and a huge new market is not universally shared among Japanese businesses. Some companies are moving operations to other countries instead, and others are keeping business back home. Japanese companies poured $4.5 billion into China in 2006—a 30% drop from the $6.5 billion invested in 2005, according to China's Ministry of Commerce.

Japanese electronics firms all have operations in China, for example, but mostly for low-end assembly work rather than high-end production. The reason has little to do with protecting the jobs of Japanese workers (most of whom are actually part-time staff who lack the generous perks provided to full-timers). Instead, it is to prevent intellectual-property theft and boost innovation by keeping development and manufacturing close together—at home.

As competitiveness increasingly comes from manufacturing efficiency and more intellectual property is applied to the production process, it makes sense to keep operations at home. Besides, sophisticated manufacturing tends to be less labour-intensive, reducing the appeal of low-wage countries. And regional governments are offering generous incentives for firms to open new factories in Japan.

Ricoh, an office-equipment company, makes low-tech parts in China but keeps advanced technology in Japan. This month Canon said it would build a $450m optical-sensor factory in Japan. Sharp's sophisticated LCD flat-panel televisions are made at two factories in central Japan, and the company will announce plans for a new factory in Japan this summer.

As for carmakers, Toyota, Honda and Nissan have built big factories in Guangzhou to build vehicles for Chinese customers. But because of the weak yen, which makes exports cheaper, car firms are building more vehicles at home. Honda is even opening a new factory in Japan, its first in almost 30 years, despite falling domestic sales. Likewise, Toyota says it plans to build more cars in Japan for export.

Even for Japanese firms that are investing overseas, surveys show a shift away from China in favour of other Asian countries. In 2004 around 86% of Japanese firms planned to expand in China; last year the figure dropped to 77%, and 2% said they were actually scaling back their Chinese operations. In another survey, which asked Japanese firms to rate which countries they regarded as the best places to invest in the next three years, the proportion opting for China dropped from 91% in 2004 to 77% last year, while the appeal of Vietnam and India rose substantially (see chart). This is partly because China has become expensive compared with elsewhere in Asia. There is also concern over anti-Japanese sentiment.

Yet part of the problem for Japanese firms is that their business practices do not work well in China. Managers are invariably Japanese and are promoted on the basis of seniority rather than merit, so prospects for local staff are poor. (Chinese executives joke that if you want to learn about communism, work for a Japanese firm.) Worse, Japanese companies are used to dealing with a few long-standing partners. Mori's Yoshimitsu Isoi says his firm found it hard to put everything into a written contract in China, rather than relying on verbal agreements as in Japan.

As for the Shanghai building itself, a giant circular opening at the top had to be changed to a rectangle in 2005 after the Chinese public objected that it looked like the rising sun of Japan's imperial flag. The reality, however, is that Japanese firms are starting to look elsewhere.
Who write this? sounds like a typical Japanese who got his/her information over the internet without any research. China's economy grew expanding by 11.9 percent over this a year, and the Chinese goverment try to apply the brakes in efforts overheating economy in China, controling and limiting foreign investment is a very normal thing. Why this guy so proud about Japanese investment drop in China???
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Old August 1st, 2007, 06:36 PM   #1951
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hehe, china articficially boosts its own fdi figures. chinese state-owned companies use subsidiary shell companies in hong kong to invest in china, which means that really china is china's biggest foreign investor. you gotta love em for that

anyway, the future success of china will be interesting. it will be an epic battle between china itself (success), and the chinese communist party (failure). anyway, let us for now enjoy the construction of this fabulous building in shanghai.

CCP is leading China, if China is successful, that means CCP is also sucessful. You get the ponit?
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Old August 1st, 2007, 06:59 PM   #1952
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Great shoot from flickr by duffjg

image hosted on flickr
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Old August 1st, 2007, 07:05 PM   #1953
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Who write this? sounds like a typical Japanese who got his/her information over the internet without any research. China's economy grew expanding by 11.9 percent over this a year, and the Chinese goverment try to apply the brakes in efforts overheating economy in China, controling and limiting foreign investment is a very normal thing. Why this guy so proud about Japanese investment drop in China???
The Economist is probably the most respected weekly paper on the planet. The author is probably not Japanese. It just happens to be an interesting topic. You should buy that magazine some day.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 07:38 PM   #1954
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gkiegerl View Post
Great shoot from flickr by duffjg

image hosted on flickr
I can't see the top
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Old August 1st, 2007, 07:46 PM   #1955
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flickr, shot taken august 1st by Bennett Summers

image hosted on flickr


High res: http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1364/...ce164d3f_o.jpg


August 1st by jens erna

image hosted on flickr

Last edited by Skymyhusband; August 1st, 2007 at 09:29 PM.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 10:17 PM   #1956
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Quote:
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The Economist is probably the most respected weekly paper on the planet. The author is probably not Japanese. It just happens to be an interesting topic. You should buy that magazine some day.
I do read Economist. and I don't believe because it posted on Economist, we need to take it as is. All author have agenda and Economist's author is no exceptions, I can tell sir you are no dummy and I hope you can read between lines. My question still stand, why he try make people believe Japan FDI drop 50% in China is a good thing, in fact it is a very bad thing for Japan.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 10:42 PM   #1957
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yes i agree swfc is too close to jin meo to appreceate it.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 11:02 PM   #1958
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yes i agree swfc is too close to jin meo to appreceate it.
Oh no, can anyone upload an updated classical bund view pic? I hope SWFC is not blocked at least from the classical angle.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 11:45 PM   #1959
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In the last picture, what is the grey building that is being constructed in front of Shangri-la?
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Old August 2nd, 2007, 12:16 AM   #1960
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In the last picture, what is the grey building that is being constructed in front of Shangri-la?

Hopson center


http://img152.imageshack.us/my.php?image=defyl2.jpg
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