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Old March 6th, 2007, 07:22 PM   #1
i_am_hydrogen
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MADISON | University of Wisconsin-Madison Development News

UW-Madison's billion-dollar building boom
Plan is biggest in decades; projects include replacing 1960s-'70s architecture
The Business Journal of Milwaukee - November 24, 2006
by Pete Millard

Photo: Scott Paulus
The construction boom on and around the UW-Madison campus is the most ambitious since the 1960s, when university planners were bracing for the arrival of the baby-boom generation, said Alan Fish, a UW-Madison associate vice chancellor.
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It's good to be a construction worker in Madison.

The University of Wisconsin-Madison, the state's largest institution for higher education and a premier research university, is building for the future -- erecting new laboratories, academic buildings and resident halls in record numbers.

The construction boom taking place on and around the UW-Madison campus is the most ambitious building program since the 1960s, when university planners were bracing for the arrival of the baby-boom generation, said Alan Fish, the university's associate vice chancellor for facilities, planning and management.

Ironically, many of the buildings built in the 1960s and early 1970s are the ones being replaced because they no longer function efficiently and are architectural scars on the campus landscape.

There are eight construction projects under way on campus valued at $500.8 million, according to Fish. There are another 18 construction projects in design or planning stages valued at $670.3 million, bringing the total to $1.2 billion.

According to Fish, the $1.2 billion in construction expenses is split nearly half and half between gifts and general revenue/student fees. Donors have contributed $515.1 million in gifts and grants to cover the construction. The remainder is covered by general funds and program fees from students.

A handful of large campus construction projects already have been completed, including the $110 million reconstruction of Camp Randall Stadium in 2005.

"There may be more construction cranes per square acre in Madison than anywhere in the Midwest, maybe the country," said Mark Olinger, a planner with the city of Madison.

The building boom on campus isn't finished either. Fish can rattle off half a dozen landmark campus buildings scheduled to be replaced or renovated in the next 10 to 15 years.

Many of the 1960s-generation structures, such as the Humanities Building, Ogg Hall, the Van Hise Building and portions of the old University Hospital, are deteriorating and have outdated HVAC systems that make them impractical to renovate, Fish said.

In addition to the office, research and classroom projects on campus, construction cranes dotting the Madison isthmus have been used to erect 57 apartment buildings, some offering ground-floor retail space, near campus since 1998. Those projects are valued at more than $500 million and have 3,800 units.

The majority of privately-managed apartment complexes are located on Mifflin, Charter and Regent streets, as well as University and West Washington avenues, just on the southeastern edges of the campus.

"As a city, we've decided that's where the high-rise apartments should be," said Olinger.

In 2006, private developers opened four high-rise complexes that added 788 apartments at 700 University Ave., 309 W. Washington Ave., 409 W. Gorham St. and 333 W. Mifflin St.

Since 2002, developers have added 2,774 apartment units to the campus area.
East campus projects

Two of the recently completed university projects on the east end of campus are the office and parking facility at 21 N. Park St. and Newell J. Smith Hall, the campus's first new residence hall in 41 years.

One block north of Smith Hall, the university is building the 615-bed Ogg Hall on the corner of Dayton and Park streets. The $36 million dormitory, which will open in August 2007, opens the way for the university to demolish the existing Ogg Hall towers to make way for a pedestrian mall and recreational fields north of the Kohl Center on the southeast side of campus.

Builders have already begun work on a $40.5 million addition to Grainger Hall, 975 University Ave., that will be the new home of all MBA programs offered by the UW School of Business. In addition to state-of-the-art classrooms, it will include an MBA program office, career center and multipurpose plenary room that seats up to 265 people. The Grainger Hall addition will be open for the 2008 fall semester.

In summer of 2006, ground was broken for the redevelopment of University Square Mall in the 700 block of University Avenue. The single-story shopping and commercial center built in the early 1970s was demolished in spring of 2006. Contractors are building an 11-story, mixed-use project that is a partnership between the university and Executive Management Inc., the Madison company that owns the property.

When finished, the $56.9 million University Square will include more than 250,000 square feet for university, student and health offices. The rebuilt University Square will allow UW-Madison to consolidate University Health Services offices and provide space for student services such as the bursar, registrar and student financial services.

University Square also will include 100,000 square feet of retail, 300 privately developed and managed apartments and a 420-vehicle parking structure. The development is part of the East Campus Pedestrian Mall that eventually will stretch from Lake Mendota and Memorial Union at 800 Langdon St., to just north of Regent Street.

The completion of University Square in 2009 will mean campus planners can demolish the Peterson Building, 750 University Ave., which currently houses the student financial offices, to make way for an expansion of the Chazen Museum of Art, a 60,000-square-foot structure that will be across Murray Street from the existing site of the museum.

In the meantime, planners are looking for space to temporarily place the music and history departments so the university can demolish the Humanities Building at Park Street and University Avenue and rebuild near the existing site, said Gary Brown, campus director of planning and landscape architecture.
West campus projects

There are three major construction projects under way on the west end of the campus and several more in the planning stages. Those under way include the $20 million expansion and renovation of the Mechanical Engineering Building, which is near University and Engineering drives; a $120.5 million new Microbial Sciences Building and the new $134 million interdisciplinary Research Center near UW Hospital & Clinics, 600 Highland Ave.

In 2007 and 2008, the university plans to begin work on the $150 million Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, the $88.5 million Biochemistry Building and the new $88.1 million Union South redevelopment.

"We need to construct more 100-year buildings," said Brown.

The Mechanical Engineering renovation upgraded the building's HVAC system, added an atrium, updated labs and created more classrooms and lecture halls. The historic facade of the 1930s building was preserved even though the entry way was rebuilt.

On the corner of Babcock and Linden drives, the university is constructing a 330,000-square-foot Microbial Sciences Building that will be finished in May. It is the second building in the $317 million BioStar program to replace outdated facilities used by the departments of bacteriology, medical microbiology and immunology, and food microbiology and toxicity.

The project will include labs for 47 research groups, classrooms, instructional labs and 150 underground parking spaces.

The Interdisciplinary Research Center is part of the HealthStar initiative created to improve health science facilities at the university. The center is located next to the UW Hospital & Clinics. It will be a three-tower complex that will constructed in two phases. The first phase is a five-story tower on top of a three-story base.

Two other projects are under way on the west end of the campus -- the $85 million American Family Children's Hospital and the $24.9 million Veterinary Diagnostic Lab.
UW's master plan

University planners unveiled a new master plan for the campus in the fall of 2005. The plan envisions using buildings to create more open spaces that complement the Memorial Union Terrace and Henry Mall and to form new academic neighborhoods on campus, as well achieving architectural harmony and better ways of getting around the expansive campus.

Many of the concepts for the 2005 plan are borrowed from the university's master plan dating back to 1908, said Brown.

The 1908 master plan, which was the building guide for the university until 1933, established order on a rapidly expanding campus, said Brown. The 99-year-old plan set the groundwork for many of the quadrangles and open spaces that grace the campus today.

The 2005 plan takes many of the early concepts and advances them one step further, said Brown. For example, the development of the East Campus Pedestrian Mall is consistent with how early UW planners thought the campus should function, he said.

The current construction and building plans for UW-Madison are intended to create a less haphazard design approach to campus.

Brown is intent on eliminating the mish-mash of architectural styles that allowed the slab-like McArdle Cancer Research Building to be connected to the stately Nutritional Science Building.

Or the planning decision that allowed the UW Law School's contemporary addition to clash with the rest of Bascom Hill, which is designated as a National Register Historic District.
BUILDING BOOM

UW-Madison's major projects in planning, design or construction.
In construction Total $ (in millions)
Interdisciplinary research complex $134
Microbial Sciences 120.5
American Family Children's Hospital 85
University Square redevelopment 56.9
Grainger Hall addition 40
Dayton Street residence hall 35.9
Veterinary diagnostic lab 24.9
Ogg Hall removal, site improvement 3.6
Subtotal $500.8

In design or planning Total $ (in millions)
Wisconsin Institute for Discovery $150
Biochemistry II 88.5
Union South redevelopment 88.1
Lakeshore residence hall expansions 67.8
Human ecology addition, renovation 48
Memorial Union renovation phase I 43.6
Sterling Hall renovation 39.5
Chazen Museum addition 35
Education building renovation, addition 31
West campus utility distribution 26.5
East campus utilities, pedestrian mall 20
Warehouse redevelopment-Arts Loft 8.8
Chadbourne Hall renovation 6.6
Waisman Center remodeling 6
Integrated dairy facility phase II 5.2
Washburn Observatory renovation 2.5
Lot 36 parking ramp addition 2.5
Campus Drive bike/walk path phase I 0.9
Subtotal $670.3

Total in construction and planning: $1,171.1

Source: UW-Madison



Quote:
UW-Madison's major projects in planning, design, construction, or completion.

Newell J. Smith Hall - Completed







21 N. Park - Completed





Ogg Hall - U/C



The Interdisciplinary Research Center - U/C




Construction progress as of today (courtesy of a local webcam).



Microbial Sciences Building











American Family Children's Hospital - Completed 8/06





University Square - U/C
The POS building that used to be there.





Grainger Hall Addition - U/C








A snapshot of construction progress as of today (courtesy of a local webcam).



Dayton Street Residence Hall - U/C



Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory - Completed 10/06



Quote:
In design or planning
Wisconsin Institute For Discovery






Note: I did not create this google map drawing.



East Campus Pedestrian Mall
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Old March 6th, 2007, 08:38 PM   #2
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Good news for UW-Madison. Bad news for the rest of the UW system. The bias that exists in the Board of Regeants -especially financially speaking- sickens me, but I won't get into that. It'll be interesting to see the campus transform over the next several years.
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Old March 6th, 2007, 09:41 PM   #3
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i find this mind boggling. UW is incredibly beautiful today; I can't imagine what it will be like with all the new construction. The people in Wisconsin are incredibly lucky to have not just the university, but the capital city in which it lies.

Madison and UW are among the real jewels of the Midwest.
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Old March 6th, 2007, 10:10 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by D-res View Post
Good news for UW-Madison. Bad news for the rest of the UW system. The bias that exists in the Board of Regeants -especially financially speaking- sickens me, but I won't get into that. It'll be interesting to see the campus transform over the next several years.
Well you have to look at the upside of all of this. With the new construction, hopefully more students from outside Wisconsin will be interested in UW, and admissions will jump. With the expansion of UW's medical facilities perhaps Madison can become an even larger medical giant than it already is - generating more tax revenue and increasing the average income of Wisconsinites. Now if UW Milwaukee's plans for medical facilities goes through, it will create a large medical/biotech corridor on I-94 from Milwaukee to Madison.
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Old March 6th, 2007, 11:06 PM   #5
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Well you have to look at the upside of all of this. With the new construction, hopefully more students from outside Wisconsin will be interested in UW, and admissions will jump. With the expansion of UW's medical facilities perhaps Madison can become an even larger medical giant than it already is - generating more tax revenue and increasing the average income of Wisconsinites. Now if UW Milwaukee's plans for medical facilities goes through, it will create a large medical/biotech corridor on I-94 from Milwaukee to Madison.
True. But I find it alarming that UWM struggles to complete their private $100 million dollar research-initiative campaign, while UW continues to receive public funding for their smorgasborg of projects.
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Old March 6th, 2007, 11:53 PM   #6
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Thank god for Milwaukee taxpayers
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Old March 7th, 2007, 07:18 AM   #7
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True. But I find it alarming that UWM struggles to complete their private $100 million dollar research-initiative campaign, while UW continues to receive public funding for their smorgasborg of projects.
The unfortunate truth is UW Madison is the flagship university for the state - it represents all UW colleges and universities in the state. Its the campus that the nation views, that Wisconsin uses to recruit students to. That's why I was disappointed when UWM students rejected changing the name to Wisconsin State University - it would have had a totally new identity and drawing tool, and it would have looked less subservient to Madison.

Oh, and how do people donate funds for this medical facility for UWM anyways??
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Old March 7th, 2007, 03:19 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by brewcityfan View Post
The unfortunate truth is UW Madison is the flagship university for the state - it represents all UW colleges and universities in the state. Its the campus that the nation views, that Wisconsin uses to recruit students to. That's why I was disappointed when UWM students rejected changing the name to Wisconsin State University - it would have had a totally new identity and drawing tool, and it would have looked less subservient to Madison.
it is a shame the renaming didnt work out. I, for one, voted for the name change however it seemed not enough people were into the idea. Hell I even started a facebook group and got a very good turnout of people joining and saying they supported the name change. I guess we were just too outnumbered, even though I doubt it would have gotten any farther had the vote gone the other direction.

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Oh, and how do people donate funds for this medical facility for UWM anyways??
http://www4.uwm.edu/giving/index.cfm
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Old March 9th, 2007, 02:06 AM   #9
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Guys, your discussion here is something I've been thinking about for awhile...not for Wisconsin, per se, but for the way things play out nationally. I'd be very interested in your opinions on this:

UCLA is a great institution and it certainly has a name that stands up on its own...all ininitals and everyone knows what they stand for. But UCLA's success fostered something I hate in university names: THE UNIV OF ____ @ _______

I can't think of a worse naming system. The flagship instituion of the university system (be it in Madison, Chapel Hill, Austin, or even Berkeley) prefers to keep its original non-city name. In sports, in fact, the city name doesn't appear at all...Univ. of Wisconsin, Univ of No. Carolina, Univ. of Texas, etc.

School logos write Wisconsin, North Carolina and Texas large and Madison, Chapel Hill, and Austin small. It's as if UW-Madison wishes it was still UW (and, in fact, UW does mean UW-Madison to most).

Meanwhile, the rest of the schools in the system have names that come across as "branches"...suggesting an unequal status, not being the "real" Univ. of ______. Flagships cannot write the name of the state large so they must be UIC, UCSB, UAB.

Yet through it all, the schools in the system are actually separate universities with much independence from others in their system.

Iowa, like Wisconsin, has a university system. Unlike UW, its members are not all named the same way. Iowa's system, all under the same board of trustees has sister insitutions...they are not known as the University of Iowa at Iowa City and the University of Iowa at Ames. They're the University of Iowa and Iowa State University...separate schools, separate identifies.

There is no flagship with the name of its city added on to the regret of the institution. There are no other schools in the system that feel like branches in their name.

Couldn't the University of Wisconsin system remain and, like the UNC system include all of the state's public universities but with separate names in many case (NCSU is part of the system as much as UNC-CH is).

Why not have:

the University of Wisconsin....located in Madison
the Wisconsin State University....located in Milwaukee
Green Bay State University...located in Green Bay
the University of La Crosse...located in LaCrosse

Wouldn't that be a step up from UW-Madison, UWM, UWGB, UWLC??????????
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Old March 9th, 2007, 02:39 AM   #10
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Honestly I could care less about the other schools in the state concerning the names of their respective school. The other schools also, IMO, don't really care much about their name either, or think it's a big deal to have UW before their actual name. Many go to various other colleges in the state in the beginning as an easier way to get into Madison anyways. The only school where the majority of students don't really have that big mindset of leaving for Madison is in Milwaukee.

This leaves the big issue with UW-Milwaukee, and that's primarily because UW-Milwaukee should recieve as much (or slightly less than) support as Madison in the UW system. Many believed changing the name to Wisconsin State University in Milwaukee could result in better recognition across the state and across the county in terms of recruiting new students and promoting the school's various programs with the NCAA. I honestly never saw such a large grassroots campaign at UWM's campus to rally students to the name cause. It even stirred Milwaukee's entire soul slightly - people were talking about this subject with a lot of seriousness about it.
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Old March 9th, 2007, 03:28 AM   #11
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brew, does UWM currently have any special status in the UW system or does only Madison have that?
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Old March 9th, 2007, 04:04 AM   #12
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brew, does UWM currently have any special status in the UW system or does only Madison have that?
Perhaps D-res could answer this better, since he goes to UWM, not me yet. *I go to Milwaukee Area Tech* But, from the hard feelings college students have from Madison and the college board of regents - I think only Madison has the special status. While Madison goes through renovations and new construction (apparently crossing the 1 billion dollar mark), UW Eau Claire's Student Senate debated for weeks if students should help pay their professors because of lack of payroll funds going to the university. UW-Milwaukee (as noted in previous posts) is struggling with getting private funds for a new medical research facility, which both Milwaukee County and City leaders want and yearn. UW Waukesha, a two year college, is having its own funding difficulties because of its limbo in possibly becoming UWM's western campus - because of no funds supporting the initiative.

Unfortunately the government in Madison, with our governor being a resident of the area since birth, and the Board of Regents' bias towards UW, refuses to look beyond its own city and metro borders when it comes to its college assistance.

I also want to add that I do love the new additions for UW Madison and I understand the reasons why it is getting the monies needed for all this, but then also the Board should give its other campuses some of the love, at least some....
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Old March 9th, 2007, 04:12 AM   #13
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Old March 9th, 2007, 01:25 PM   #14
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Perhaps D-res could answer this better, since he goes to UWM, not me yet. *I go to Milwaukee Area Tech* But, from the hard feelings college students have from Madison and the college board of regents - I think only Madison has the special status. While Madison goes through renovations and new construction (apparently crossing the 1 billion dollar mark), UW Eau Claire's Student Senate debated for weeks if students should help pay their professors because of lack of payroll funds going to the university. UW-Milwaukee (as noted in previous posts) is struggling with getting private funds for a new medical research facility, which both Milwaukee County and City leaders want and yearn. UW Waukesha, a two year college, is having its own funding difficulties because of its limbo in possibly becoming UWM's western campus - because of no funds supporting the initiative.

Unfortunately the government in Madison, with our governor being a resident of the area since birth, and the Board of Regents' bias towards UW, refuses to look beyond its own city and metro borders when it comes to its college assistance.

I also want to add that I do love the new additions for UW Madison and I understand the reasons why it is getting the monies needed for all this, but then also the Board should give its other campuses some of the love, at least some....
what you have described does not apply just to the UW system; it is a universal fact among public flagships. they get more than their share of money.

that may seem unfair and certainly to the students at the "other campuses" it very well may be. But, Brew, consider the following: the flagship serves the state in far more ways than offering an education to its students. It is the research generator for the state in a way that no smaller institution (dare I say one with less status) can offer. The flagship can help draw and keep business in state. It is a draw for the state from places beyond its borders. It serves far more than its own student body.

Among the great things that put Wisconsin "on the map", UW-Madison is very high on the list.
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Old March 9th, 2007, 01:32 PM   #15
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Honestly I could care less about the other schools in the state concerning the names of their respective school.
I respect that, brew. but what I am asking is this:

• Do flagships suffer from having their city's name as part of their own? they seem to shun it. Would the school in your state's capital prefer to be the University of Wisconsin or the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Your neighboring states contain the University of Iowa and the University of Illinois Urbana/Champaign. Which sounds better to you and which would you rather sound like?

• Do non-flagship schools end up sounding like branches of the flagship? Would the school just off Milw's far north lakefront rather be known as the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) or Wisconsin State University (WSU) in establishing its own identity?

Words count. Images count. Universities (like every sectgor of our economy) spend millions on image issues...including names and logos.

So I want to go back to this question and would like to get more input if possible...not just from a UW perspective:

Is the concept of a Univ of ____ @ _____ naming system for universities harmful to both the flagship and other campuses?
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Old March 9th, 2007, 07:29 PM   #16
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I respect that, brew. but what I am asking is this:

• Do flagships suffer from having their city's name as part of their own? they seem to shun it. Would the school in your state's capital prefer to be the University of Wisconsin or the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Your neighboring states contain the University of Iowa and the University of Illinois Urbana/Champaign. Which sounds better to you and which would you rather sound like?

• Do non-flagship schools end up sounding like branches of the flagship? Would the school just off Milw's far north lakefront rather be known as the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) or Wisconsin State University (WSU) in establishing its own identity?

Words count. Images count. Universities (like every sectgor of our economy) spend millions on image issues...including names and logos.

So I want to go back to this question and would like to get more input if possible...not just from a UW perspective:

Is the concept of a Univ of ____ @ _____ naming system for universities harmful to both the flagship and other campuses?
  1. To first answer the question for this bullet, I'd say I like the University of Iowa better because it's a straightforward name other than Illinois's which seems to blabble on forever with its name. But, University of Wisconsin-Madison's name IS shunned, and people in this state don't even throw in Madison's name anyways - it's just the "University of Wisconsin". Yes, for any formalities' sake, I'd hope the name Madison would be wiped off the UW name there, but other than that.....it is, in both the minds of the nation and in the sports limelight (CBS, ESPN, and the NCAA called UW-Madison Wisconsin, or UW)
  2. The whole point of the University of Wisconsin system is for the other branches to be branched from the hub, UW-Madison. That's where UW-Milwaukee's issues start hitting the fan - because UW-Milwaukee's students/professors/administrators don't want the branch feel and don't want the secondary status on everything, especially funds. It was a shame that the students by what I believe was a slim majority decided to keep the UWM name - but I think that was just because students aren't extreme fans of change to many systems. We just take the bs and move on. But if UW-Milwaukee wants to have better recongnition, it MUST change its name first - Wisconsin State University sounds like the best choice for it. That's the only way to get any leverage in the status-quo.
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Old March 9th, 2007, 08:57 PM   #17
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brewcity:
The UW system is not designed as a hub around Madison, Madison is just another spoke in the hub. Most students don't start at another school and transfer to Madison. When someone says "I go to the UW", it usually doesn't mean Madison, although anyone that goes to Madison tends to try to promote their school by making it seem that it is the UW instead of UW-Madison. Within the UW system, when someone refers to UW Madison it is usually called just Madison, while the other schools are Usually Called "UW-School Name"

The big problem with funding for the UW system is that Madison is the Capitol, so all the legislators are there, as well as the HQ for the UW system. Thus when people allocate money, they tend to do it more towards what they can see, and they ignore all the other schools. With the legislators being so close to the school it means that there is a closer bond between them, and that leads to the inherent bias.
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Old March 9th, 2007, 10:15 PM   #18
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brewcity:
The UW system is not designed as a hub around Madison, Madison is just another spoke in the hub. Most students don't start at another school and transfer to Madison. When someone says "I go to the UW", it usually doesn't mean Madison, although anyone that goes to Madison tends to try to promote their school by making it seem that it is the UW instead of UW-Madison. Within the UW system, when someone refers to UW Madison it is usually called just Madison, while the other schools are Usually Called "UW-School Name"
Maybe up in Wausau that's the viewpoint, but in Milwaukee it's not. When I graduated high school with my classmates, most went off to different UW schools with the intent on a year or two down the road transferring to Madison. It's common to see students do that from the Milwaukee area - if you can't get in direct from high school, you get in the backdoor route.
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Old March 9th, 2007, 11:32 PM   #19
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I’m at UWL and I’ve always heard that the tuition dollars that I pay don’t even stay at UWL. The money that the school acquires from tuition (this is minus anything the UWL foundation receives as donations) is sent to Madison. From there Madison decides what money gets allocated to what school. If this is true then it would show Madison is indeed the center of the hub and not just a spoke in the wheel. Can any one substantiate this with evidence? I’m going to try to do some digging on my own.
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Old March 10th, 2007, 04:11 AM   #20
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I never liked the idea changing the name of UWM to Wisconsin State. Wisconsin State sounds like a rural school. It sounds like it could be anywhere in Wisconsin. But it isn't just ANYwhere, it is in the best city in the state!

I much preferred the University of Milwaukee or Milwaukee University. That implies a strong, urban school to me. WSU sounds second-rate to me. I absolutely hate the current hyphen though.

Lots of cities have great universities named after them. Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Chicago, New York, Miami, etc. Why not Milwaukee?
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